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Interview?

Posted by newms, in Interview 14 February 2011 · 284 views

So, I got an email this morning from a POI at one of my top choices asking for a chat tomorrow via Skype. The prof said he has been looking at my application with great interest.

He used the word 'chat' rather than 'interview', so I'm not sure if it's a formal interview or not, but in either case I'll be preparing for that.

Does anybody have any tips? I've done job interviews before, even interviewed people for jobs, but I haven't had a grad school interview before.

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Here's questions that my interviewer asked me

1. Tell me why are you interested with this program?
2. I forgot the interviewer exact words; but, he was trying to gauge my interest level towards the program over other programs I applied
3. Tell me about your past research (publications, etc)
4. Identify faculties of interest

Questions to ask:
ask the interviewer about what's up and coming in their lab

things to do prior to the interview:
- read their latest publications.
- have all your sop and app materials ready in front of you.

Good luck!
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Here's questions that my interviewer asked me

1. Tell me why are you interested with this program?
2. I forgot the interviewer exact words; but, he was trying to gauge my interest level towards the program over other programs I applied
3. Tell me about your past research (publications, etc)
4. Identify faculties of interest

Questions to ask:
ask the interviewer about what's up and coming in their lab

things to do prior to the interview:
- read their latest publications.
- have all your sop and app materials ready in front of you.

Good luck!


Thanks. I'm going to have some questions prepared about the research being done there and about his recent publications.


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All of my interviews were pretty easy to handle. One interviewer was a bit different, though, and started off my asking me what I am going to do when I fail out of school. "What's plan B?" So that was a great way to start things off.

I had read the papers for all of my interviewers but it never helped me. Usually they just talked about their work. I interjected a few questions, but they were based on what they interviewer was describing and not based on my previous knowledge of their work. I would suggest heading to the NIH reporter website, inputting the prof's name, and seeing what they are currently working on (if they are funded through NIH).

Mostly my interviewers wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting myself into and making sure I would fit into their program.

Good luck!!
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the best advice i've gotten from my profs and elders in preparing for interviews (skype, in-person, phone, etc) is to 'be yourself'. don't try to act like someone who you aren't or can't be. listen to their questions, and give appropriate replies. i am pretty sure you will do fine. good luck!
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the best advice i've gotten from my profs and elders in preparing for interviews (skype, in-person, phone, etc) is to 'be yourself'. don't try to act like someone who you aren't or can't be. listen to their questions, and give appropriate replies. i am pretty sure you will do fine. good luck!


That's great advice, thanks. When I saw that email this morning, I got so excited I couldn't think straight. I'm just going to have to make sure I'm calm for the interview and I think I'll be ok.
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All of my interviews were pretty easy to handle. One interviewer was a bit different, though, and started off my asking me what I am going to do when I fail out of school. "What's plan B?" So that was a great way to start things off. I had read the papers for all of my interviewers but it never helped me. Usually they just talked about their work. I interjected a few questions, but they were based on what they interviewer was describing and not based on my previous knowledge of their work. I would suggest heading to the NIH reporter website, inputting the prof's name, and seeing what they are currently working on (if they are funded through NIH). Mostly my interviewers wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting myself into and making sure I would fit into their program.Good luck!!



<div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; "></span>Thanks for the advice - that question about your plan B sounds like something I would ask an applicant just to see how they react<img src="http://forum.thegrad...t/rolleyes.gif" alt=":rolleyes:" class="bbc_emoticon">&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; ">Thanks for the suggestion to look up information on the NIH reporting website. Unfortunately I didn't find anything there - I'll look at other funding agencies' websites to see if they have any info.</span></div>
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Good luck! I can't give you any advice you haven't already gotten - but I am rooting for you!! :)
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I'll offer some often neglected advice: Don't be afraid to pause and consider a question or your response to a question.

It makes you look thoughtful and deliberate. If you must fill the void of silence but aren't yet prepared, use a filler like "That's a great question!" or "Hmm, interesting. Let me think..."
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Good luck! I can't give you any advice you haven't already gotten - but I am rooting for you!! :)


Thanks. I'm rooting for you too!Posted Image
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Good luck!

I agree with all posters: be prepared (bring extra copies of everything), be upbeat, enthusiastic, interested, etc. (even if you're really not!), and especially, try to get the prof to talk as much as possible.

As they say in theatre, "break a leg" :)

Take care,
John
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I'll offer some often neglected advice: Don't be afraid to pause and consider a question or your response to a question.

It makes you look thoughtful and deliberate. If you must fill the void of silence but aren't yet prepared, use a filler like "That's a great question!" or "Hmm, interesting. Let me think..."


Good advice. I'll have to remember to be deliberative because I have a tendency to talk too quickly when I'm excited.
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Good luck!

I agree with all posters: be prepared (bring extra copies of everything), be upbeat, enthusiastic, interested, etc. (even if you're really not!), and especially, try to get the prof to talk as much as possible.

As they say in theatre, "break a leg" :)

Take care,
John


Thanks for the well wishes John!
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That's awesome that you have an interview! That means they're seriously considering you, which is great. Good luck -- hope it goes well! :)
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I have no advice to offer, but good luck! :)
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Great news. newms! Good luck on your "interview".

I'll be having a mine via phone on Thursday.
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Congrats on the great news!
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Great news. newms! Good luck on your "interview".

I'll be having a mine via phone on Thursday.


Fantastic news kroms! Best of luck and I hope they admit you!
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Thanks for the well wishes everyone. The chat went very well and the POI said I should look out for an offer later this week.
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In several days, i will go for an interview, too. It is very helpful to read these comments above. So, good luck, and thank you all!
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In several days, i will go for an interview, too. It is very helpful to read these comments above. So, good luck, and thank you all!


Good luck to you with your interview!
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