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Transitions v. Parents

annieca

3,496 views

First off, congrats to everyone who has gotten an acceptance! Second, hugs and much tea and choice of wallowing food for those who have had nothing but rejections or have been rejected to their top choice.

I am sitting with two acceptances right now. And i'm ready to make a decision. I'm ready to start looking at housing for my new program and figuring out if I can get a job in that city. I don't have to officially decide until April 15th for a US program or actually, August, for my other program. So why am I ready to decide now, when all the options aren't in? And what does this have to do with my parents?

Right, so, little back story. I am a DoD brat (sounds a bit nicer than Army brat) and I've moved three times in my life, five if you count undergraduate and study abroad. I'm used to living in a place for 5-7 years and then moving again. In fact, since my parents have been married, they haven't lived in one place longer than 7 years. Needless to say, the transitioning constantly has put a bit of wear on me emotionally.

I know for a fact that wherever I got to graduate school (with the exception of Maryland, perhaps), I will move shortly after graduation for a job. So, in my mind I'm going "Okay, I move from study abroad to either home/DC for the summer, then move to who knows where for three years of graduate school, finally get comfortable and then move again for a job." And to me, that doesn't add up. It's too much transitioning for me. Too much uncertainty, and this feeling that I'll never really get comfortable anywhere because I'm so used to just picking myself up and plopping down in another place.

The UK Master's I'm looking at is a one year program. It's at my study abroad institution so I don't have to move cities (housing, yes). Almost all of my friends at said institution are second year undergrads so they'll be around for the one year I would stay there for. I know the city, and as infuriating as Welsh trains are, it's a nice place to live. A wee bit expensive, but nice.

And then there's tuition. If I got absolutely no funding at my top US choice, it would be double the price of a degree at Aber. So yes, the UK is looking pretty good. I've gotten over the ALA/CILIP accredidation kerfluffle and I'm ready to get my dissertation done and graduate from undergrad and move onto the next step.

But... my parents do have a point. I'm guaranteed housing at Aber so I technically don't have to sign a rent contract if I don't want to. I am probably going to get funding at least one university, despite my being MA and the other degree being Library Science which rarely funds. And maybe that will make the cost comparison at least equal, if not tipped in the US's favor.

But three years for two master's, versus 1 year for one when I'm pretty sure I'll be getting either a second Master's, PhD, or law degree at some point after the first/second masters? I love school but not *that* much.

Everything seems to be pointing in one direction but I shall wait. In the meantime, if any of the MLIS's or Public History/Public Humanities MAs want to send out decisions, I'll be happy to consider them!




2 Comments


i think you will be ok.  I've moved 11 times and I've learned to really love the changes that it brings.  My mother in law moved 40 times.   (she is now about 70-- moved an average of once a year both as a child and after she was married). 

I'm sure it affects people in different ways, but it kind of depends on your attitude.  If you are afraid of change, then most likely you will have bad experiences with it.  Besides, it is much easier now to keep in contact with friends and family.  I actually see my dad (who lives 3 hrs away) more than I see my mom who lives in the same town as me.  

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You should hear the way my mum's carrying on about moving to the US... my extended family barely ever leaves my home town, and consider it a huge ordeal when they do; none of them has gone abroad in years and years apart from two city holidays with me to France and Ireland. Ignore what they say; it's your future and it's not going to be run by anyone else!

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