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  2. Hello everyone, I made a post a separate post about this, but thought it might be just as useful for everyone else if I posted it here as well: So I've been looking at various schools, and have gotten what I want pretty narrowed down. School along with the program. My question is, how important is continuous research? What I mean by continuous research is, basically joining a very similar research lab that you were in say for your undergrad. I.e. I was in a protein biochemistry research lab using NMR for structural and dynamic information regarding proteins, and the PhD programs/lab I'm looking at are very similar (they may have some slight differences, but overall still protein biochemistry using NMR for structural/dynamic). Basically, the research lab I would be joining, I already know a lot about the field, the instrumentation, and the theoretical background knowledge. Since I've also read a lot of literature regarding the field, I would also be very up to date to the newest concepts in said lab. I ask this because I know its important to have previous research experience when looking for PhD programs for undergrad, but how important is related or very similar research (I call it continuous)? Of course it'll be better, but by how much? Does it boost my application to that lab by a lot? The reason I ask this is because my application isn't all that amazing (3.0 gpa 50% GRE), but I have 3 years experience with one lab (no publications), and great LOR, but the schools that shared my similar interest are along the lines of Brown University, USC, UCSD, City College of New York, Duke, and University of Arizona. Now there are some big names in there, but all the labs I'd be joining at these schools would basically be labs that are very similar to what I did in my undergrad (if not almost identical except for different proteins). So I'm trying to get any edge I can (especially when writing my personal statement) to get into these schools. I think my PI herself actually knows some of them, so she might even be able to shoot the POS an email herself and maybe hook something up (maybe).
  3. Hello everyone, So I've been looking at various schools, and have gotten what I want pretty narrowed down. School along with the program. My question is, how important is continuous research? What I mean by continuous research is, basically joining a very similar research lab that you were in say for your undergrad. I.e. I was in a protein biochemistry research lab using NMR for structural and dynamic information regarding proteins, and the PhD programs/lab I'm looking at are very similar (they may have some slight differences, but overall still protein biochemistry using NMR for structural/dynamic). Basically, the research lab I would be joining, I already know a lot about the field, the instrumentation, and the theoretical background knowledge. Since I've also read a lot of literature regarding the field, I would also be very up to date to the newest concepts in said lab. I ask this because I know its important to have previous research experience when looking for PhD programs for undergrad, but how important is related or very similar research (I call it continuous)? Of course it'll be better, but by how much? Does it boost my application to that lab by a lot?
  4. Today
  5. Eviltoaster is looking at English programs and had general questions about foreign language requirements of PhD programs. I discussed it from that POV. I do no research in foreign languages because there is little scholarship on Cormac McCarthy in other languages. What little there is, has no impact on what I'm working on. Yet, I still needed a foreign language, because English Departments require it. Sometimes, it is as simple as fulfilling a requirement. Eviltoaster is trying to ascertain if he meets certain requirements. What you write of, cannot be predicted prior to admission to a particular program. All that can be done in anticipation of applications is to look at program requirements to see whether it may take additional work after one is in a program. In your particular case, the additional requirement does not appear to be a set-in-stone requirement from the program, but rather one your advisor deems necessary now for you to succeed. Obviously, you could not have anticipated that prior to applying, as you state it will only have a moderate impact on what you are studying. That is a completely different set of things that often become necessary once a person is admitted to a program.
  6. I'm about to enter my first year of grad school and while I'm excited about the things I'm going to learn and the people I'm going to meet, I'm terrified as well. The I.S. is strong in this one and mainly is due to the fact that I've been out of school for so long. I got my bachelor's over 15 years ago and when I decided to try for a MA I had great support and encouragement from former profs that I'd kept in touch with. It was a great honor to be accepted to the program (I got my BA here), but now I'm absolutely panicking that I'm going to let everyone down, that I won't be able to keep up, that my experience in the "real world" won't help me a jot now, and that the academic world is a foreign language I'll never learn. I'm worried that I'm going to be spending so much time trying to study, or helping out profs in the department (I'm also going to be a grad assistant for four professors...how that happened, I'll never know), that I'm going to drown. I'm trying to be proactive about certain things; namely, I do suffer from depression so I've spoken with my physician about adjusting my medication and I'm also looking into seeing a therapist at the campus health center. I also joined a gym in order to exercise some stress away (that has started to help me already). I'm trying to get as organized as I can, as well as speaking to my profs early to get to know them and what they are like. Is there anything else I can do to help minimize the anxiety I'm feeling? Or is it just one of those things where I'm going to have to walk into the fire and see if I've got fireproof underwear?
  7. I assume for a top school like Chicago, low GRE scores could definitely hurt an application (I totally forgot that some programs even require them at the M* level). Your good verbal and writing scores seemed to work in your favor. Hopefully holding an MA already will help offset low scores, but I would not be surprised if it did not (HDS actually waives the GRE requirement for applicants who already hold an advanced degree). Thanks for the info the fellowship. I will certainly look into it.
  8. I am attaching my SOP for Applied Finance masters at SMU, Singapore. I request you to review my SOP. I am also attaching my Resume, please take a look at it. SOP MAF.pdf Resume .pdf
  9. Cheers to disappointment! I am currently at one of the schools in your list that you are applying to, so let me know if you need any information.
  10. I'm applying to 10 PhD programs and am in the same boat. I'm constantly looking for ways to trim, but my list will probably still be 10 in December.
  11. Be forewarned that the LEND program is on the chopping block with the new administration. http://cqrcengage.com/aucd/app/write-a-letter?5&engagementId=364373 I would not count on it to be around past the end of this fiscal year in September.
  12. This is something I've personally done, and really depends on the professor and your relationship with them, and what kind of people you both are. Personally, I like to become close to my professor, in regards to research and personally. As in, when things get tough and I need help, I go sit down and talk to them (when they have the time). I will set an appointment with them, and tell them my research concerns, and my emotions regarding said concerns. Most PIs want to see you succeed, and want to help you succeed. It sounds to me like your PI seems like a very understanding and nice person. That said, I'd just talk to him about the concerns. Tell him, I'm sorry I've kept getting prices or experiment set up wrong, sorry for wasting your money etc. Then I'd tell him emotionally how much it bothers me. Most likely, not only will your PI offer you some emotional help and tell you its fine, or normal and stuff like that happens all the time, but they can also offer you advice on where to go and how to fix the problem itself. I had a similar issue myself with an SPR that we bought for the sole purpose so I alone could test binding. I ended up wasting at least 10+ chips and multiple samples (I had never used SPR prior and my PI just said have fun go crazy). She ended up asking me one day why we were ordering so many chips and parts, and I told her because I messed up and didn't know how to use the SPR and basically proceeded with trial and error. I told her how bad I felt that I kept messing up and wasting money, and felt like I should have gotten it by now, etc. She told me SPR is difficult regardless, especially for me since I had no training was self teaching essentially, and ended up helping me out a bit to the point where I resolved the problem shortly after and got amazing results. Made me feel less like an idiot, and helped me with my problem too.
  13. Hello, I'm going to assume you're discussing the NMR for either protein/structural work or for smaller molecule work. They have a 600, one 500 two 400s, a 300, and a 250. If you meant small molecule, then overall they have 3 NMRs for you, if you were looking at macromolecules, then they have 2. Note: I am not at Scripps, just interested in joining their structural biophysics program, so have looked it up previously.
  14. I've had this discussion multiple times with multiple people, and from someone who has studied and taken it, the verbal section is ok, but the quant is absolutely garbage. 1) Math is about critical thinking skills. When I approach a math problem, I look over the problem, try to create an equation using variables, and create relationships between multiple equations if the problem requires it. This takes time, more than 90 seconds for each problem. Math takes time, you can ask every single mathmetician out there and they will agree. The main technique to solving questions on the GRE quant section is to look for "key words" or certain problem sets, that can either be solved using an equation you have to memorize, or that you can plug in chug. Yes, plug in chug is the most commonly taught method to solving GRE quant problems. Why? Because of the bullshit time limit on this exam. When I take the untimed versions, I score almost perfect scores (got a 168 the last time I took one), when I take the timed, I score around the high 150s. I simply run out of time to do the problem, because I believe there really is not enough time. Sure you could say maybe I'm a bit slow in general, but that doesn't mean I'm an idiot or a bad student, just a slow test taker. 2) With the reasons above stated, the GRE is an absolute shit test in testing someones math skills. With proper studying and enough classes/tutors, any student despite their previous math skill can succeed on the quant test. I have seen multiple times English and Film majors actually score better than Math and Physics major on their quant. Does that mean English and Film majors are better than Math and Physic majors at math? No, it just means the GRE is a dumb test to evaluate anything. Someone stated it previously best, the GRE score only represents your ability to take the GRE, and that's it. It doesn't represent what kind of a student you are, doesn't represent your intelligence, nor your ability to do well in whatever program you are applying for. It is for this exact reasons many schools look at your other stuff in the application, and may just dismiss your GRE scores outright. The schools know its shit, the students know its shit, I refuse to believe the test makers themselves don't know its shit. From what I've gathered, the main thing the GRE is for, is for international students. To make sure their english and math skills are competent. I'll say this much though, its definitely a good business. We have what Magoosh, Princeton, Manhattan, CrunchPrep, Mcgraw, Peterson, etc. reviews, classes, and practice tests? Each ranging from 60 to sometimes 1000 bucks?
  15. If it helps with the questions regarding GRE scores, I got into MA programs at Chicago, YDS, and Duke with a very low quant score (around 140) and received, what I considered, good funding. Granted, my area is philosophy of religion, and my verbal and writing scores were in top tenth percentiles. This was just my experience, and I had some reasoning in mind for not trying to improve the GRE scores. I considered re-taking the GRE but, ultimately, decided against it. I only took it once (during final year of undergrad, the year before), and math has always been a big weak area for me. In the end, I reasoned it was a better use of time, as I was working full-time, to focus on the SOP and writing sample. Some people might not feel comfortable with this, and emphasizing those aspects over the GRE was probably a risk, though I felt confident that the time on the SOP and writing sample were worth it. Thus, I say this to point out this represents just my experience, and I don't know how such choices might affect the chances of others' applications. Also, if funding is a concern at Chicago, you might want to look into applying for a FLAS fellowship as well, as it includes funding and a stipend. I'm not sure if they offer it for (modern) Hebrew, but I recall seeing it on the list.
  16. That sounds like a good range. As someone going for a Biochemistry PhD program, it's really hard to gauge though. Since research experience and LOR can often times triumph low GRE and GPA scores, its hard to say what schools not to apply for (i.e. I have a gpa of 3.00 but am applying to Brown University). At the end of the day, i'd say its up to your budget. I currently have 8 schools, but I'm going to narrow it down to 5 (not regarding whether I can get in or not, but regarding my interest in the program) since my budge is under $400 overall (including sending GRE scores).
  17. Im in my second year of a masters program in Psychological research and have had my MacBook Pro since my junior year of high school (2011) and it still runs really well. The only time it starts running slowly is when I have many many SPSS files open in addition to large docs and PDFs, which really, it isn't often I have that many files of that size open at once. Granted, I bought mine for about $1,000 at the time and am not looking forward to the day I need a new laptop. In terms of the quality, I always say I'll probably be an Apple person for life because of this. But like everyone has said, it really depends on your preferences, program, field etc.
  18. I agree with telkanuru on the range. Almost all MA programs are not as selective as PhD programs, and many are cash cows to fund the latter. Since you already did research on your possible choices, then you are generally aware of the admission requirements for each program. If your stats meet those requirements you should be able to get into at least a few. In any event, don't do what I did, which was to apply to only one. Luckily I was admitted, but I should have had two or three alternatives just in case.
  19. Hi there, I was selected this morning for an Ops position
  20. This is mostly correct, but I would add that it also depends on what field you're in. Some programs don't care much about what language you use to fulfill the requirement, so long as you can go ahead and fulfill it. But there are many subfields wherein certain languages are seen to have far more value. I'll be taking an intensive Latin course to fulfill my req, even though I'm an early modernist, and Latin will probably only have a moderate impact on what I study. I could brush up on my undergraduate Spanish to fulfill the req if I really wanted to, but my advisor is strongly suggesting I take Latin. In other words, sometimes it's not so simple as just fulfilling a req, but rather doing it in a certain way. Unfortunately, it's very much a case-by-case basis, depending on what you already know, what your probable field is, and what the program things you should do.
  21. There are some bike paths, but I don't know if you would consider it bikeable. One does see the Mormon missionaries biking around town, but not others really. I spent the school year 14-15 at UMass in Amherst. It was the coldest winter on record and I nearly froze. Utah is a much drier climate than the northeast, so in that respect the weather isn't as bad. But, it's still pretty miserable in the winter. I dislike having no sunshine.
  22. Depending on the conference, they are generally pretty laid back. I attended a conference as a "student" a few months ago, which was 9 months after my defense and 6 months after my graduation. I had no affiliation with the university at this time, and the analysis I did for my poster was a corrected failed approach I tried to use for my thesis. I also managed to sneak in a professional membership as a "student" by registering a month before my graduation, assuming I would continue as a PhD (contingent upon funding that never came through). I'd say don't sweat it too much, nobody will be really hard-core about verifying that your name badge "student" status is legit. Take advantage of student status when you can!
  23. Hey Cristian, are you interests more specific than American/Comparative and institutions? The programs you mentioned all have strong faculty in the major subfields (as well as people who do institutions). Regardless applying broadly is not a bad strategy.
  24. Every university's foreign language requirement is different. Somewhere on the website of every program is a description of how to satisfy the foreign language requirement. If you have 4-6 semesters of college level foreign language acquired in the last five years, that will usually satisfy the requirement for one language. If you don't have the required academic background, you will have to take some sort of translation test. Some programs will supply you with copies similar translation tests. You can use a dictionary and will be given a couple of hours to complete. Unless you are going to study Old English lit, Latin won't help you much. There is a good bit of scholarship in German. The other languages that are useful in the English field are French and Spanish.
  25. @cowgirlsdontcry Thanks for the reply! I am definitely not a party person and don't drink (not for moral or religious reasons, I just don't enjoy it). I also went to school in Connecticut where the winters are often considered miserable (though perhaps not as much the winters in that area of Utah), and I'm not particularly bothered by it. I'm generally an introvert and spend a lot of my time playing with my dog and reading. Maybe this is a weirdly specific question, but do you know if Logan is generally bikeable (other than when there's snow on the ground)? I much prefer biking to driving, but I know there are a lot of places where biking everywhere is not really feasible.
  26. Utah State is in Logan. I have been there many times. It is located in the Cache Valley and the mountains to the east are pretty all the way to Bear Lake. The valley itself is OK, not gorgeous, but not ugly either. Lots of farms. Gets very hot for a couple of weeks in the summer (over 100 degrees) and there is an inversion in the winter that creates a very cold, grey area. As you are from WA state, you know how the western part of the state is prone to that. It seems that the snow does not melt, and stays on the ground until it begins to warm up in the spring. It is not like the Denver area at all, where the snow melts after a couple of days. I'm not Mormon, but the area has a high percentage of Mormons or former Mormons. Many things are closed on Sundays, or they were a few years ago. I never noticed or felt there was a problem. I really know nothing about Utah State. If you are a party person, this is not the town to be in. I don't believe I ever saw a bar there, and to buy beer, wine or alcohol in Utah, you used to have to go to the state liquor store. Don't know if Logan has one. The whole valley's population is about 100,000. Logan itself is about 30,000.
  27. Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. I graduated from college in May and I'm seriously considering getting an SLP master's. I'm working right now to save money, but, according to my calculations, the closest program to me (University of Washington) would force me to rack up 40k+ of debt. I would prefer to limit my debt to 20k if possible, especially since I would love to work in a high-need public school district that isn't necessarily the best paying. Here's a bit more about me: graduated in May from Yale University with a BA in linguistics (so I'd need to do a post-bac for most schools) college GPA is 3.93, magna cum laude, phi beta kappa (okay I'll stop with the Greek and Latin now) resident of Washington state haven't taken the GRE yet currently working as a paraeducator in a public school in a self-contained special education classroom would love to work in public schools somewhere in the western half of the US (or Canada if I could somehow get a visa) have a special interest in AAC (from my experiences working with kids on AAC devices, PECS, etc.) and autism am definitely not looking to start school full-time until at least 2018-19, if not later I've been looking at schools in the Western Regional Graduate Program, because they offer in-state tuition to Washington residents and most of the schools in Washington have pretty high in-state tuition compared to those in states like Utah and Idaho. I've focused on Utah State University because the school: offers an online post-bac (which would allow me to keep working during the day and earning money) lets Washington state residents pay in-state tuition has a low cost of living (very low when compared to Seattle) seems to be in a beautiful area of the country (other than air pollution, which I can live with) has various grants, assistantships, and scholarships listed on their website-- I'm especially interested in the URLEND-Autism program which has a $7500 stipend seems to be reasonably reputable (good enough to be employed in public schools) I also looked at University of Utah, but it seemed to be somewhat more expensive and listed less funding sources. I bet people will ask, so no, I'm not Mormon, and I'm pretty liberal politically, but I've had lots of Mormon friends and don't think Utah would be too challenging in that respect. I'd love to hear from you if you have experience with USU, know about potential funding/loan forgiveness programs I might qualify for, or generally have any advice for me. Thank you!
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