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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/24/2016 in all areas

  1. Wyatt's Terps

    2017 Acceptances

    I just checked OSU's website. I GOT IN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "Congratulations - you have been offered admission! Use the link on the main page of the Applicant Center to accept or decline. Please click the Application Requirements tab above to see what items, if any, are still needed. Items with a status of 'Incomplete' are still required, 'Received' are currently being processed, and 'Completed' have fulfilled the requirement." I can't believe it. Utter shock and joy right now. I keep worrying that I'm going to refresh and it's going to go away...
    22 Points
  2. JessicaLange

    2017 Acceptances

    Hi, so I received an Acceptance email on Tuesday. I actually didn't want to open it, because the email just said Admission Decision. Very ominous. But I figured I would open it and then go to whateber online portal later and, to my surprise, it said Congratulations! It's DePaul University. It's the only MA program I applied to so it's kind of Plan B, but I really like the program, so as far as backup plans go, it's definitely one I'm happy about. And it's so much pressure off of me to know that I can get 8 rejections and still be going somewhere in the fall. Feel free to post your acceptances here. And maybe Rejections and Waitlists as well if you feel comfortable with that (unless you want to start a separate thread).
    15 Points
  3. Today, I found myself extremely bored. As a result, I complied a list of when schools typically notify for first-round acceptances using data from the results page. After, I rearranged things in order by when programs typically notify. Michigan State-Dec 10? OSU-Jan 20 PSU-Jan 26/27 Wisconsin- Jan 28 Duke- Jan 29 Vanderbilt- Jan 29/30 Northwestern-Jan 29-Feb 2 Johns Hopkins-Jan 29-Feb 2 Berkeley- Jan 30-Feb 2 Chicago- Feb 1/2 Minnesota-Feb 2 Texas- Feb 3/4 Indiana-Feb 3/4 Purdue-Feb 3-5 WUSTL-Feb 3-5 UCLA- Feb 4/5 Davis-Feb 5/6 Pittsburgh-Feb 5/6 Nebraska-Feb 5-7 NYU-Feb 6/7 Maryland-Feb 7-9 Rochester-Feb 8/9 Emory- Feb 8-9 Irvine-Feb 8-9 Illinois- Feb 9-12 Brown-Feb 10-12 LSU-Feb 11 Rice- Feb 12 Buffalo-Feb 12 Missouri- Feb 12-14 Delaware-Feb 12-14 Kansas-Feb 14 Carnegie Mellon- Feb 14/15 Alabama-Feb 14-16 Cornell- Feb 15/16 Miami University-Feb 15/16 Michigan-Feb 16 Connecticut-Feb 16 CUNY-Feb 16/17 Santa Barbara-Feb 17-19 Stanford- Feb 17-Feb 20 Princeton-Feb 17-20 UVA- Feb 19/20 Rutgers-Feb 19/20 Harvard- Feb 20-Feb 22 Columbia- Feb 20-22 Penn- Feb 20-22 Utah-Feb 22 Notre Dame-Feb 23 Yale- Feb 24/25 Washington-Feb 25 Syracuse-Feb 26 Chapel Hill-Feb 26/27 Oregon-Feb 27-28 Iowa-March 2-5 Florida State-March 4-7 Mississippi-5-7
    14 Points
  4. Wyatt's Terps

    Things to Do While You Wait for Decisions

    Twiddle your thumbs Binge-watch a show on Netflix / AmazonPrime / Hulu Check GradCafe once an hour Do distance searches on GoogleMaps between your current residence and each of your desired programs Find out when your desired programs' Admitted Students days are and check flight or drive options Get super invested in a video game (online or otherwise) Re-read the Harry Potter series (because of course we've all read it at least once) Take up knitting Take up jogging Take up mud wrestling Get a massage Buy a crossword or sudoku book and immerse yourself in words or numbers Make mix CDs or playlists, and really think about how songs can go together Buy a cheap musical instrument and teach yourself to play Spend quality time with a dog, whether it's a friend's, a neighbor's, a family member's, or your own Do the above with a cat and pretend it's reciprocal Make lists of favorites - favorite books, movies, TV shows, songs, albums, potato chips - and share them with friends Create spreadsheet inventories of your books and other media Do a serious top-to-bottom cleaning of your room / apartment / home Go to a local coffee shop for an hour a day and imagine yourself as someone from a different walk of life each time ... By no means an exhaustive list, and mostly tongue-in-cheek...but feel free to add to it!
    11 Points
  5. byn

    Fall 2017 Clinical Psychology Applicants

    Endlessly refreshing the TGC results page like.... When will my schools/POIs send out invites... lol
    11 Points
  6. JeremyWrites

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Enough time on this website has taught me that if you're sure of yourself, you're delusional. I mentioned this on the "waiting it out" board, but whenever I start to freak out I work on my "what if I don't get in plan." Rather than sitting at home and thinking about it, I actually have like a physical document of which steps to take, what jobs to apply for, which summer programs to consider, etc. So if the worst happens, I have an "in case of emergency break glass" document I'm one of those colossal dweebs who finds solace in productivity, and so it makes me feel better to work on something that will remedy the very thing that I'm freaking out about.
    10 Points
  7. cancergirl

    2017 Applicant Profiles and Admissions Results

    Hey you guys, after almost giving up hope and crying..I finally got my first interview for Molecular Cell Biology & Genetics, PhD at Drexel University. I'm so excited. Don't ever give up hope, everyone's time is coming! Interview dates are Feb 6-7, Feb 16-17 and Feb 27-28.
    10 Points
  8. Turretin

    What does a "strong" undergraduate app look like?

    For MA, you should look something like this. http://www.schools.com/articles/three-ways-strong-applicant-competitive-schools.html And for PhD, you have to look stronger: Edit: Dawww.... A downvote? Dang. I thought it was funny.
    10 Points
  9. jungThug

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Anybody else feel like they can't get anything done till they hear some news? My mentor says that I'm going crazy with stressing about the decisions and its hurting my progress in my MA. I blame Trump, racism, and capitalism. I also blame myself. I just want to be paid very little money in exchange for reading/writing/teaching books. Why is that so hard to get?
    9 Points
  10. Wyatt's Terps

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Personally, every time I think I'm a sure bet to get accepted, I begin a sequence of self-flagellation and bathing in vinegar while reading Heidegger. Works like a charm.
    9 Points
  11. I now believe the process of applying to clinical psychology doctoral programs is designed to ensure that you need at least 2-3 years of therapy to recover from applying to clinical psychology doctoral programs, thus keeping the profession alive in perpetuity.
    9 Points
  12. imogenshakes

    2017 Acceptances

    I, too, am a longtime lurker, but I'd like to step out of the shadows to claim this one! I was stunned to hear back so early, and with a university-wide fellowship nomination to boot! Congrats to those who've heard positive things already...and best of luck to those still waiting! I have 8 more programs to hear from yet, so fingers are still crossed here for more good news.
    9 Points
  13. tvethiopia

    2017 Acceptances

    ALL BETS ARE OFF, PEOPLE!
    9 Points
  14. Longtime lurker here who signed up just to write this. I feel as though this thread is being derailed by discussions about the validity of various social work approaches, particularly one school and their program. I feel as though there are individuals inferring that those of us who are applying to U of T ( or"McMSW" as one other poster has called it) are uninformed or ignorant consumers of the neoliberal academy. Honestly, and I'm speaking for myself here, I'm just an individual trying to move into the career of my choice. Yes I find it important to reflect on my values and the values of the program, but I'm not here to debate these things. I hope we can all be respectful of everyone's choices. Although I appreciate your passion towards your approach to social work, and your concern that some of us are making the wrong choice, I invite those of you who would like to continue this debate about social work and higher education to please move to another thread. This thread is for applicants to help each other, inform one another, and to receive updates. Personally, these discussions are becoming rather toxic and I would like to continue to see this thread being used as intended. I just want to connect with other people who are applying to similar programs. We're here to help each other out, not criticize people who choose particular programs. Thanks.
    9 Points
  15. juilletmercredi

    Advice for a first year PhD student

    About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a heartbeat. Another thing to keep in mind: a dog can be a great comfort when you're all stressed out over graduate school. Advice? Age: -Don't feel like you have nothing to offer just because you are younger. I was 22 when I started graduate school. You got accepted to the program for a reason, and chances are you are just as equipped as any older students are to successfully complete the program, just in a different way. -Your older classmates may be just as terrified as you. Talk to them. You have a lot in common. You are, after all, in the same place. -You will feel like an imposter, like you don't belong, or like you are constantly behind. Or all three. It's normal. It will pass. (Well, sort of.) People of all ages go through this. Adviser related: -If you are lucky enough to get both research interest fit and personality fit perfect, congratulations! But sometimes, personality fit is more important than research interest fit as long as the research isn't too different. A great adviser is interested in your career development, likes you as a person, advocates for you, and wants to hear your ideas. Even if his or her research is quite different from yours, they may give you the autonomy to work on your own projects and just supervise you. A bad personality fit will drive you nuts, even if you love his or her research. Consider that when evaluating your adviser fit. (This will vary by field: research fit may be less important in the humanities, more important in the natural and physical sciences. Social sciences are somewhere in-between.) -Don't be afraid to be straight up blunt with your adviser when it comes to asking about your progress. Ask if you are where you should be both academic program wise and getting-a-job-after-this-mess-wise. -Be proactive. Advisers love when you draw up an agenda for your one-on-one meetings, come with talking points and progress to share, have concrete questions to ask, and have overall shown that you have been thoughtful and taken control of your own program. Of course, this won't immediately come easily to you, but in time you will work up to it. Every semester I type up my semester goals, and at the beginning of the year I type up annual goals. I show them to my adviser and we talk about whether they are too ambitious, or whether I need to revise them, and how I can meet them. -Don't expect your adviser to actually know what courses you have to take to graduate. They will know about comprehensive exams and the dissertation, but a lot of professors don't really keep up with the course requirements, especially if their program is in flux. Get you a student handbook, and find out what you need to take. Map it out in a grid, and check off things when you finish them. Show this to your adviser every semester. You may have to explain how such and such class fills a requirement. -Nobody loves you as much as you, except your mother. Keep this in mind as you take in advice from all sources, including your adviser. Your adviser is there to guide you, but that doesn't mean you have to do everything he says. Studying: -You will have to read more than you ever did before, in less time than you ever have before, and you will be expected to retain more than you ever have before. The way that you studied in undergrad may need some tweaking. Be prepared for this. -Corollary: you may find that your methods change with age or interests or time. I preferred to study alone in college, but in grad school, I prefer to study in groups. It keeps me on task and the socialization keeps me motivated. You may find that you shift from being a more auditory learner to a visual learner or whatever. -You will feel behind at first. This is normal. -At some point you will realize that your professors don't actually expect you to read everything they assign you. This, of course, will vary by program, but there will be at least one class where the reading is actually impossible to do in one week. The point is to read enough that you know the major themes and can talk intelligently about them, and then pick some of the readings to really dig into and think more deeply about. -For most programs, don't worry so much about grades. If you stay on top of your work and do what you're supposed to, you will probably get an A. How much grades matter varies from program to program. In some programs, a B is a signal that you are not up to par, and more than a few Bs will warrant a discussion with your adviser or the DGS. My program isn't like that - A, B, it's all meaningless. My adviser doesn't even know what my grades are. But at almost all programs, a C means you need to retake the course, and two Cs means you have to convince the DGS not to kick you out. Extracurricular activity: What's that? No, seriously: -A lot of your time will be unstructured. You will have coursework, but most grad classes meet once a week for two hours and you may have three classes. You may have meetings with your adviser every so often and some seminars or things to catch (like we have grand rounds and colloquia that are required), but a lot of time will be unstructured. However, since you have so much more work than you had in undergrad, you actually will have less free time than you had in undergrad. This may initially cause you great anxiety. It did for me. Some people love unstructured time, though. (I don't.) -Because of this, you'll have to be planful about your non-grad school related stuff. -TAKE TIME OFF. DO it. It's important for your mental health. However you do it doesn't matter. Some people work it like a 9-5 job. Some people take a day off per week (me) and maybe a few hours spread across the week. Some people work half days 7 days a week. However you do it, there needs to be a time when you say "f this, I'm going to the movies." -Find your happy place, something that keeps you the you you were when you came in. I love working out. It gives me energy and I feel good. I stay healthy. I also love reading fiction, so sometimes I just curl up with a good book, work be damned. You have to give yourself permission to not think about work, at least for a couple of hours a week. You may also discover new hobbies! (I never worked out before I came to graduate school.) -Your work will creep into all aspects of your life, if you let it. This is why I hate unstructured time. You will feel guilty for not doing something, because in graduate school, there is ALWAYS something you can do. ALWAYS. But since there will always be more work, there's no harm in putting it aside for tomorrow, as long as you don't have a deadline. -You may need to reach outside of your cohort for a social life. None of my close friends are in my doctoral cohort. I've met master's students in my program, master's students in other programs, and I know a few non-graduate students I hang out with, too. Go to graduate student mixers. (If your university doesn't have any, organize some, if you like planning parties.) Join a student group that doesn't take up too much time. I had a doctoral acquaintance who kinda laughed at me because I joined some student groups other than the doctoral student one, and I was usually the only doctoral student in those groups, but I met some close friends (and future job contacts) and had a good time. -DO NOT FEEL GUILTY FOR WANTING A LIFE OUTSIDE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL. This is paramount. This is important. You are a well-rounded, complex, multifaceted human being. NEVER feel bad for this. Everybody wants some kind of life outside of work. Yes, you may loooove your field, but that doesn't mean you want to do it all day long. Some other doctoral students, and perhaps professors, may make you feel bad about this. Don't let them. Just smile and nod. Then disappear when you need to. Career: -This is job preparation. Remember that from Day One. Always be looking for ways to enhance your skills. Read job ads and find out what's hot in your field, what's necessary, what's in demand. For example, in my field statistics and methods are a hot commodity, and they're not a passing fad. I happen to really like statistics and methods, so I have pursued that as a concentration of mine. -Don't be afraid to take on volunteer work and part-time gigs that will give you skills that will be useful both inside academia and out, as long as it's not against your contract. Your adviser may be against it, but he doesn't have to know as long as it doesn't interfere with your work. -If you want to work outside of academia - if you are even *considering* the possibility - please please definitely do the above. Even if you aren't considering it, consider the possibility that you won't get a tenure-track job out the box and that you may need to support yourself doing something else for a while. You will have to prove to employers that you have developed usable, useful skills and this is one of the easiest ways to do it. But don't overdo it - get the degree done. -For more academic related ones - always look for opportunities to present and publish. Presentations look good on your CV. Publications look better. When you write seminar papers, wonder if you can publish them with some revision. Write your seminar papers on what you maybe think you may want to do your dissertation on. Even if you look at them three years later and think "these suck," you can at least glean some useful references and pieces from them. Discuss publication with your adviser early and often, and if you have the time and desire, seek out publication options with other professors and researchers. But if you commit to a project, COMMIT. You don't want to leave a bad impression. -If you can afford it, occasionally go to conferences even if you aren't presenting. You can network, and you can hear some interesting talks, and you may think about new directions for your own research. You can also meet people who may tell you about jobs, money, opportunities, etc. -Always try to get someone else to pay for conference travel before you come out of pocket. Including your adviser. Do not be shy about asking if he or she can pay. If he can't, he'll just say no. Usually the department has a travel fund for students, but often it's only if you are presenting. -If you are interested in academia, you should get some teaching experience. There are two traditional ways to do this: TAing a course, and teaching as a sole instructor. If you can help it, I wouldn't recommend doing a sole instructor position until you are finished with coursework. Teaching takes a LOT of time to do right. You should definitely TA at least one course, and probably a few different ones. But don't overdo it, if you can help it, because again, it takes a LOT of time. More than you expect at the outset. If you are in the humanities, I think sole instructor positions are very important for nabbing jobs so when you are in the exam/ABD phase, you may want to try at least one. If your own university has none, look at adjuncting for nearby colleges, including community colleges. (I would wager that the majority of natural science/physical science students, and most social science students, have never sole taught a class before they get an assistant professor job. At least, it's not that common n my field, which straddles the social and natural sciences.) -Always look for money. Money is awesome. If you can fund yourself you can do what you want, within reason. Your university will be thrilled, your adviser will be happy, and you can put it on your CV. It's win-win-win! Don't put yourself out of the running before anyone else has a chance to. Apply even if you think you won't get it or the odds are against you (they always are), as long as you are eligible. Apply often. Apply even if it's only $500. (That's conference travel!) Money begets money. The more awards you get, the more awards you will get. They will get bigger over time. If you are in the sciences and social sciences, you should get practice writing at least one grant. You don't have to write the whole thing, but at least get in on the process so that you can see how it's done. Grant-writing is very valuable both in and outside of graduate school. -Revise your CV every so often. Then look and decide what you want to add to it. Then go get that thing, so you can add it. -The career office at big universities is often not just for undergrads. I was surprised to learn that my career center offers help on CV organization and the academic job search, as well as alternative/non-academic career searches for doctoral students. In fact, there are two people whose sole purpose it is to help PhD students find nonacademic careers, and they both have PhDs. This will vary by university - some universities will have very little for grad students. Find out before you write the office off. -It's never too early to go to seminars/workshops like "the academic job search inside and out", "creating the perfect CV," "getting the job," etc. NEVER. Often the leader will share tips that are more aimed towards early graduate students, or tidbits that are kind of too late for more advanced students to take care of. This will also help you keep a pulse on what's hot in your field. It'll help you know what lines you need to add to your CV. And they're interesting. Other: -Decide ahead of time what you are NOT willing to sacrifice on the altar of academia. Then stick to it. I'm serious. If you decide that you do NOT want to sacrifice your relationship, don't. If it's your geographical mobility, don't. I mean, be realistic, and realize that there will always be trade-offs. But you have to think about what's important to you for your quality of life, and realize that there is always more to you than graduate school. -If you don't want to be a professor, do not feel guilty about this. At all. Zero. However, you will have to do things differently than most doctoral students. Your adviser will probably never have worked outside of the academy (although this may vary depending on the field) so he may or may not be able to help you. But you have a special mission to seek out the kinds of experiences that will help you find a non-academic job. Test the waters with your adviser before you tell him this. My adviser was quite amenable to it, but that's because I told him that my goal was to still do research and policy work in my field just not at a university, AND because it's quite common in my field for doctoral students to do non-academic work. If you're in a field where it's not common (or where your professors refuse to believe it's common, or it's not supposed to be common)…well, you may be a little more on your own. -Every so often, you will need to reflect on the reasons you came to graduate school. Sometimes, just sit and think quietly. Why are you doing this to yourself? Do you love your field? Do you need this degree to do what you want to do? Usually the answer is yes and yes, and usually you'll keep on trucking. But sometimes when the chips are down you will need to reevaluate why you put yourself through this in the first place. -To my great dismay, depression is quite common in doctoral students. Graduate work can be isolating and stressful. Luckily your health insurance usually includes counseling sessions. TAKE THEM if you need them. Do not be ashamed. You may be surprised with who else is getting them. (I found out that everyone in my cohort, including me, was getting mental health counseling at a certain point.) Exercise can help, as can taking that mental health day once a week and just chilling. Don't be surprised if you get the blues… -…but be self-aware and able to recognize when the depression is clouding your ability to function. Doctoral programs have a 50% attrition rate, and this is rarely because that 50% is less intelligent than, less motivated than, less driven than, or less ambitious than the other 50% that stays. Often they realize that they are ridiculously unhappy in the field, or that they don't need the degree anymore, or that they'd rather focus on other things in life, or their interests have changed. All of this is okay! -You will, at some point, be like "eff this, I'm leaving." I think almost every doctoral student has thought about dropping out and just kicking this all to the curb. You need to listen to yourself, and find out whether it is idle thought (nothing to worry about, very normal) or whether you are truly unhappy to the point that you need to leave. Counseling can help you figure this out. -Don't be afraid to take a semester or a year off if you need to. That's what leaves of absence are for. Lastly, and positively… …graduate school is great! Seriously, when else will you ever have the time to study what you want for hours on end, talk to just as interested others about it, and live in an intellectual community of scholars and intellectuals? And occasionally wake up at 11 am and go to the bank at 2 pm? Sometimes you will want to pull out all of your hair but most of the time, you will feel fulfilled and wonderfully encouraged and edified. So enjoy this time!
    9 Points
  16. imogenshakes

    2017 Acceptances

    I GOT INTO MADISON!!!!! I just spent 20 minutes sobbing into my hubby's shirt. I'm kind of in disbelief. Had written off the option because I messed up the formatting of my writing sample, so I guess this means that those things don't matter too much. I'm so excited! Hoping all of you who applied to OSU hear back soon!
    8 Points
  17. Sam Anscombe

    Admissions Blog 2017: Taking Over

    Hi all, Last admissions cycle, you might have seen Jac Barcan around offering advice and predictions for the 2016 season. For the Fall 2017 cycle, I will be taking over the blog. I posted my predictions on the blog today. Each prediction is based on an average of the last ~5 release dates. I follow the methodology of my forebearers by occasionally omitting outliers or adjusting the average to fit patterns (e.g., if a university always releases decisions on a Friday but the average date falls on a Saturday, I round the average to the nearest Friday). Although some schools are based on five years worth of data, some are based on only one or two data points. I followed Jac's lead by adding more unranked programs to the list (most notably, MSU, SUNY Binghamton, and SUNY Buffalo). My data points are gathered from the TGC survey, but I do not know how accurate all of the dates are. Hopefully down the line, the accuracy of our predictions will improve. I am always open to suggestions. You can view the blog at philosophyadmissions.wordpress.com Once admissions notifications start to come out, I will be active on here and on the blog. I will check TGC for updates and update the blog accordingly at least once per day. If you have any tips you would like to contribute to the blog but do not want to post on TGC, please feel free to contact me on here or by email at philosophyadmissionsblog at gmail dot com. Good luck with the rest of your applications. Yours, Sam
    8 Points
  18. VMcJ

    Welcome to the 2016-17 cycle!

    Hello, people. I've been in this forum last cycle, when I got eight rejections and was devastated for some time. But I've got my act together and tried again this cycle (this time with a different academic purpose, 14 applications, new letters of recommendation, etc.). I was planning to come here in February, but what I didn't expect was that by now I'd be already admitted to Rice (!!!). So I decided to anticipate my return. For everybody here anxious and nervous about everything: try to relax if possible. A handful of rejections does not mean you're not fit for doctoral studies, neither that you're not going to get what you want eventually. This is important and I almost let it slip when I was depressed about my results last year. But the most important thing is this cycle is only beginning. I figured I'd be anxious by now, but Rice put an unexpected and premature end to my nervousness. Rice wasn't even my best fit and I didn't expect it so quickly. I am certain you will eventually be as thrilled as I am right now. Best of luck for everybody!
    8 Points
  19. I didn't get an email, but when I just checked my status at Florida State it says I'm accepted. So, you know, 1. WOO HOO!, but also 2. If anyone applied to FSU, maybe check your status on the website.
    8 Points
  20. There are few words adequate to describe the suspended, weightless, breathless agony of refreshing your inbox 17 times an hour waiting for word back about interviews.
    8 Points
  21. The last few weeks has inspired me to change my research focus to "self doubt and endless rumination."
    8 Points
  22. byn

    Fall 2017 Clinical Psychology Applicants

    The two inquiries I have made re: POIs were answered, and the individuals actually provided more information on what they received, which was incredibly helpful and appreciated This has been done (historically) over threads by previous applicants, I am confused as to why there are individuals on this thread getting upset about it? It's a forum for applicants to receive/provide support and have questions/inquiries answered.
    8 Points
  23. 4eyes

    Dressing for interviews

    Part of the appeal of not being a business, med, or law student is that your physical appearance/ fashion choices normatively shouldn't (and hopefully don't) affect your interview game. On a daily basis, grad students and post docs show up to lab in t-shirts, hoodies, and jeans. Of course, interviews are "exceptional" in some respects, but a large part of the reason why interviewees dress up is because they don't want to be the under-dressed odd one out -- it's more game theory than it is rational. No matter what you look like, at the end of the day, you should feel comfortable with however you chose to dress and however you choose to do your hair/ make-up (especially women), simply because the onus is on other people to judge you for who you are and not how you look. Re: @kokobanana 's advice on wearing "non-sexy" make-up: I don't think this is entirely fair -- wear however much or however little make-up you feel is appropriate, whether or not people think you look sexy. (chances are you're all an incredibly sexy bunch regardless, and your make-up choices won't change that). I am a bit tired of women being told to dress attractively but not enticingly -- you shouldn't be made to feel you were unprofessionally dressed just because someone thought you looked hot. Also re: advice that "sneakers look out of place" -- this is, in my experience, untrue. Sneakers are great for traversing campus and probably look totally fine with whatever you're wearing. The dress-up game is one more way in which international minorities, women, and less privileged students are made to feel inadequate for reasons which have absolutely nothing to do with genuine merit -- so dress however you want to, and own it. No serious scientist is going to look at you funny 'cause you wore nikes instead of dress shoes. Be understanding and sensitive to your peers, regardless of how they look, and don't make people feel out of place come interview weekend just because they didn't choose to perpetuate the power and class stereotypes which make prestigious academic institutions so homogenous in the first place.
    8 Points
  24. It sounded to me like the suggestion was that her "colleagues who were the direct-admits" to PhD programs with only a BA were better prepared (at time of application) than those who applied with BAs and were admitted to the MA rather than the PhD, and that's the reason those direct admits were admitted to the PhD while others weren't. I could be wrong about what was intended and won't dive further into the questions of interpretation that Yanaka and angel_kaye have been discussing, but I can weigh in a bit on the difference between applicants with a BA who are admitted to an MA vs "directly admitted" to a PhD program, at least in terms of perceived difference in qualification. As far as differentiation within a PhD program between those who enter with a BA vs an MA, it's basically just a difference of requirements, depending on the program. I had to take more classes than my cohort mates with MAs, and took my qualifying exam about a semester later than their average, but there's no distinction within the program between those who entered with BA or MA, and people often forget who came in with what. Regarding differences in application quality or preparedness, the answer isn't a clearcut one by any means: I was admitted with a BA directly to a PhD program, but I don't feel that I was significantly more prepared than others who were admitted to the MA. There are so many factors at work in determining who is admitted where. I did write a BA Honor's Thesis and was able to sketch out a direction of research and state who I wanted to work with, and the person I identified as my primary POI at my eventual program is my director now, but there was so, so much I didn't know at the time as well. Perhaps my interests were more defined than some students who were admitted to the master's program, who went on to switch their research fields, but there are also PhD students at my university who entered with MAs and went on to switch research fields during PhD coursework. I do think that having two more years to develop your interests, particularly in the context of graduate coursework, is a huge advantage for those applying with an MA (and angel_kaye makes a great point that students who complete the MA can then choose which PhD programs to apply to with a more developed understanding of their research interests). But I've known students who were accepted into an MA who had more thoroughly defined research interests (and were certainly more well read) than me, and PhD students who entered with MAs who still felt they were starting from scratch with their research interests. It's a mixed bag. Angel_kaye seemed to suggest that her initial application was clearly only suitable for MA acceptance, but I could say the same thing about the straight-from-BA application that did end up getting me into a PhD program. My writing sample and SoP had plenty of problems, revealed massive ignorance about what constitutes a research field, and were outdated and canonical in focus. The problems with my writing sample and stated interests were problems that I wouldn't have even been able to identify until I completed my first year or two of grad school. Many of the straight to PhD applicants whose posts I read on GradCafé seem far more in touch with current conversations and trends in their fields than I was when I applied. Yet, I got into a PhD program, and plenty of students with extremely developed research interests (some of them formed over breaks between BA and graduate work) begin in the MA program instead. It's a complex process, and I don't think it's very easy to label any application as "only MA material," because there are so many factors at work. Certainly, if I hadn't gotten into a PhD program during my cycle, I probably would have said that my application was clearly not suitable for PhD entry. Regardless of the results of a particular application cycle (which I hope are positive for both of you!), in addition to the qualities we can analyze in our own work, applications have less definable strengths and weaknesses that are specific to the programs, the people looking at them, and the moment. I suppose the moral I'm going for is that, given the fairly strong base qualifications common to most applicants (GPA, GRE, sophisticated writing), there's no hard and fast way to count anyone out. I can't say exactly why I was accepted into my program — I'm very happy that I was — but I think my application could have just as easily, and not necessarily inaccurately, been labeled as "not quite at PhD level yet."
    8 Points
  25. Acceptance to U of Georgia's PhD program ! helloo to the people I already told on Facebook ;-)
    7 Points
  26. I thought it might be interesting to give some anecdotes that might give a desperate applicant some hope. I'm also just very anxious and bored awaiting the results of this season. These stories would ideally be underdog stories (stories involving an applicant going against the odds—though, it's hard to find someone to whom that doesn't apply), e.g., someone with really low GRE scores, or whose season is going particularly poor but whose final results are great. I have one such story. I'll spare some details but this applicant had a low quant on the GRE, was rejected almost everywhere (applied all over the PGR), and the only acceptance this applicant ultimately received was from a PGR top 5. The ONLY acceptance. That's pretty incredible and, to me, indicative of how unpredictable this process is. Sometimes that unpredictability can play in your favor. So don't lose hope! Even if you're seemingly shut out—don't lose hope until it is truly over (then cry, if truly shut out).
    7 Points
  27. pippi

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Haha yeah I guess people have different ways of dealing. I'm definitely NOT suggesting that anyone beat themselves up over anything admissions-related. It's just that, for me personally, it was really, really hard to get past my self-doubt and go through with the application process; the only way i could bring myself to do it was by treating it as an exercise in failure. I told myself that the object of the process wasn't to get in somewhere, but rather to summon the courage to put myself out there, knowing that the likely outcome would be rejection, given the hyper-competitive and arbitrary nature of phd admissions. I'm already ridiculously proud of myself for all the work I did to apply. Anything that comes after is just super delicious icing on an empowerment cake. Everyone on these boards should be proud of themselves for applying! Plenty of people quit before they even take the GRE.
    7 Points
  28. Received my first acceptance yesterday! It's been a long journey to get to this point. Wishing the rest of you guys luck!
    7 Points
  29. Oddich55

    2017 Applicant Profiles and Admissions Results

    Acceptance to report! University of Washington- biomedical informatics!
    7 Points
  30. montanem

    What is Grad School Actually Like?

    And to the initial post...this is what grad school looks like.
    7 Points
  31. milliedaisy

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    In a moment of serenity in what is to be a ~completely anxious~ afternoon, I realized that our love for research and the disciplines we're apart of will carry us far beyond today's outcome. The work we all want to do, regardless of whether or not we can through Fulbright, is necessary and important. Especially now! Best of luck y'all, I'm sending positivity!
    7 Points
  32. kyjin

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Current Fulbright here. Just wanted to wish you all the best of luck tomorrow! All the current Fulbrighters are rooting for you!
    7 Points
  33. Yanaka

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Now I'm thinking I should have used a picture on my CV, so the ad comm couldn't possibly resist my inviting and fun smile.
    7 Points
  34. Horb

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Hi all! If today is the day, good luck! Editing to add a request: If you get a notification, would you mind sharing the subject line and beginning sentence with others when you post? I'm sure some of us may be working when they go out and it might serve as a peace of mind to know if one subject line leads to one thing and another to something else. Obviously, there is no obligation!
    7 Points
  35. I hope my comment didn't upset you; I just know that after I was unsuccessful after my first round, I wanted people to be honest rather than give false hope. It's frustrating for everyone to tell you that your application is perfect and they don't know why you didn't get in when you feel like you must be missing something. I hoped to help you avoid going through this again in a year with the same limitations and the same outcome. I would encourage you to browse Student Doctor Network; they come up against this issue a lot and people much more eloquent than me have explained the problem. Unfortunately, clinical psychology PhD programs generally require a degree of flexibility when it comes to location. Even if you were accepted to a school in Boston, you would likely have to move again for internship year, and possibly even again for a postdoc. The bottom line is that applying to a small number of clinical psych programs in a highly competitive geographic area is like a high-school student only applying to a single school - Harvard. As impressive as the student might be, no college counselor is going to advise that course of action, because the odds are just not in their favor. The college counselor could look at the student's application and tell them that there are no obvious reasons why Harvard wouldn't accept them, just as there seem to be no obvious reasons you wouldn't be accepted, but there is no guaranteed formula for admission to Harvard, or a clinical psychology PhD program. All of this only applies to clinical PhD programs, though. I have no experience with counseling programs and do not know anyone with experience with them, so I really can't speak to them.
    7 Points
  36. soccerplaya

    Social Psychology Fall 2017 Applicants

    Ugh. I just got an informal acceptance into umich social psychology. Sobbing at work. I graduated with an undergrad GPA between 2.9-3.2 and have been working for five years to make up for it.
    7 Points
  37. Maybe I can provide some more context? I mentioned in your thread about NYU that I'm at UT Austin, and it's one of those programs with no terminal MA, but each cohort is composed of about 60/40 BA holders to MA holders. The only major difference is that MA holders have one less year guaranteed funding and BA holders are required to write a short MA thesis at the end of the second year. This also means you can't really transfer any outside credit. I was a BA only entrance in 2013, and I'd agree with everything @kayrabbit and @Warelin said (hey y'all!). In particular, I want to focus on the idea that BA holders are substantively better applicants because that's sooooo not the case. It is becoming more common for programs to want to solely train their students, as there is a wide variation in departmental styles and concerns. Some departments are theory heavy, while others are more historicist or ecocritical in focus. Some require a wide ranging knowledge of the field through coursework, while others allow students complete control to study what piques their interest. It can be hard for someone to receive an MA from one type of program and then move to another institution for the PhD, and it's almost impossible to understand a program's true culture without actually being immersed in it. That's just part of the many reasons why programs could prefer BA holders. On the other hand, I've just thought back on my cohort (which we consider whoever you entered with), and having started with 13 other BA holders, 4 of those people have left the program; two wrote their MA report and left, another left after a year, and one stayed for three years but left before comps. On the other hand, all of the people from my cohort with MAs are still here, and that's because they, for the most part, were aware of what they were getting into, having done it (to a lesser extent) for two years. That didn't mean they had a better grasp on their actual research or that they were leaps and bounds ahead of the rest of us, but the BA holders were also fumbling idiots. As someone who is actually writing about what I said I would in my SOP, trust me. I was still an actual idiot who rambled on about my half-baked ideas that I was excited about, but I've been able to take any class I wanted and that strange mix of influences has helped me articulate an actual dissertation topic where before I just had interests. My roommate otoh came in with an MA, and very much felt like she was starting from scratch, but she also came in with an approach to doing the work that can only be gained from experience. Our progress through the program has been right on schedule, but our actual day to day experience of working with professors in our fields is so radically different that we can only laugh/cry sometimes. All this to say, if you get in with a BA, thank whoever you swear at and don't worry about feeling inadequate. If you have to do an MA and apply again, you'll gain some useful knowledge that will cut down the ridiculously steep learning curve that is coursework. I went to a small university that no one's ever heard of for my BA, and one of my friends from there is also pursuing her English PhD. She chose to take an MA acceptance the year we applied, whereas I took a break year in Pittsburgh and got into a straight to PhD on my second try. Five years later, we talk regularly about how our experiences have differed now that she's in her second year at her PhD institution, whereas I'm a fourth year at Austin. The differences in experiences are huge, but we're both happy with our choices. Neither way is the only right way, and you'll get where you need to go.
    7 Points
  38. Things I asked included: 1) Are you able to live comfortably on the stipend that is provided or are you forced to seek out other sources of income or make sacrifices you would prefer not to make in order to have the basics (food, shelter, clothing, medical care, transportation)? 2) What is the POIs communication style? Hands on or hands off? Constructive criticism? Only points out mistakes, never successes? 3) What is a typical week like for you in terms of how much time is in class, in lab, doing clinical hours, doing homework, etc? 4) Are students supported if they wish to collaborate with other labs or different departments? 5) If students are interested in gaining clinical experience with a population that is not included in the current practicum choices, is the department open to creating an opportunity? 6) What are you expected to do during summers and are you provided a stipend and medical care for that time?
    7 Points
  39. correlatesoftheory

    Welcome to the 2016-17 cycle!

    No, they didn't release decisions and won't for another two weeks or so. I just called. I think @RevTheory1126 is right. If no one claims anything explicitly on this board, or you didn't get an email giving you the yay or nay, then don't take it seriously. I'd also like to point out that frequenters of this board would be wise to look at the date of decisions from the previous two cycles for whatever school it is that you're worried about, and go off of that. For Berkeley, it sounds like decisions won't go out until the end of next week at the earliest.
    6 Points
  40. Warelin

    Funding

    Bumping this thread for this season's applicants. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H7d9iuwSL8ZWE-DmFo2013lpF2cL7hDidWcDt4mic0Q/edit#gid=0
    6 Points
  41. Monody

    Welcome to the 2016-17 cycle!

    I suppose they analyze your Gradcafe posts and take the inverse of your carefully evaluated desperation level. :/
    6 Points
  42. PoeticsofPossibility

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    I've been placed on a waitlist for Duke's Ph.D. in English program. Let the waiting continue... 5 more to go! Good luck to everyone out there!
    6 Points
  43. Horb

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    RECOMMENDED!
    6 Points
  44. lizie.johnson

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I've been going back and forth between this forum and my email. I hate that other people know my fate and I don't....
    6 Points
  45. Ally K

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    You guys i discovered the best way to subvert anxiety over waiting to hear decisions .... get the norovirus! I just made it through two days of being super sick and now I'm like, oh yeah, Fulbright emails today. (Then immediately fall back asleep...)
    6 Points
  46. I speak in this forum as a member of UofT FIFSW Class of 2017. It's clear that Ye has his opinions and they are unlikely to change. I think this forum would be better served getting back to its original purpose of helping one another as it was used during my application cycle. Yes, applications are in now but that doesn't mean you can't provide encouraging words to one another. My other recommendation would be to ignore Ye and not engage as many have found his posts inflammatory. Obviously you all can make your own decisions but this forum has gotten a bit out of hand.
    6 Points
  47. I CAN'T TELL ANYONE BUT YOU GUYS DON'T COUNT SINCE THIS IS AN ANONYMOUS INTERNET FORUM, I'M GONNA BE AN AUNT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    6 Points
  48. Body Politics

    PhD Applications Fall '17 Season

    I love that Perique69 is still here trolling (with some wisdom, no doubt), as well as that no one is really listening.
    6 Points
  49. goldenstardust11

    Forum quieter this year?

    Well then, we shall all attempt to combat this trend! I enjoy these forums- it actually helps allay my anxiety knowing that others are out there going through the same things :). And it's kinda nice to have a safe space to obsess...
    6 Points
  50. Wyatt's Terps

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Deeeep breaths! First of all, I would go against conventional wisdom and suggest that you don't start thinking about plan Bs just yet. Give yourself until March 1st -- you should have a very good idea about whether you will or won't get into a program (or multiple) by then. Yes, some programs can notify late, and there's always the waitlist factor...but I'm personally giving myself until this date before I start to seriously look at alt-ac options. The way I see it, March 1st will give you at least 2.5 months to seriously focus on what's available before you graduate. I've got a paying gig at my program until July 1st, so it gives me four months. That should be enough time to truly gauge the lay of the land. Secondly, there is a prevailing rhetoric that there are no jobs for people with Master's degrees in English. In my experience, that's simply not the case. I'll admit that there aren't as many obvious jobs (i.e. not the well-earning, dime-a-dozen jobs you can get with a Master's in a STEM field), but you can do well for yourself if you keep an open mind. Non-profit organizations are often quite open to people with humanities degrees. A quick search on idealist.org reveals a plenitude of options. To wit: I just did a quick search for jobs in D.C. and immediately saw a Deputy Director for the National Council for Traditional Arts position that I would be well-qualified for, given my education and experience. And that's literally on the first page of a general search. I'll admit that there's typically not as much money in NPOs as in other employment, but you can make a decent living and do good work. Most arts organizations are NPOs, and you'd be surprised at the range of employment possibilities within. Teaching high school is always an option, and prep schools are possibilities as well. Publishing / editing jobs are pretty scarce (and highly competitive), but many non-humanities jobs need good writers and editors as well. The Chronicle has featured a few articles recently that emphasize how businesses are targeting individuals with humanities degrees. This is nothing new...but perhaps there's more of an uptick. Ultimately, there are definitely options. You might have to be more creative with your approach, and think outside of traditional avenues of employment, but take solace in knowing that you're far more employable with an M.A. in English than without. But seriously -- don't think about this stuff for another month or two, as it will just cause more undue stress!
    6 Points