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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/25/2017 in all areas

  1. 26 points
    Horb

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I GOT IT OMG I AM DYING!
  2. 21 points
    ibette

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I am going to Colombia !!!!!!
  3. 21 points
    juilletmercredi

    Advice for a first year PhD student

    About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a heartbeat. Another thing to keep in mind: a dog can be a great comfort when you're all stressed out over graduate school. Advice? Age: -Don't feel like you have nothing to offer just because you are younger. I was 22 when I started graduate school. You got accepted to the program for a reason, and chances are you are just as equipped as any older students are to successfully complete the program, just in a different way. -Your older classmates may be just as terrified as you. Talk to them. You have a lot in common. You are, after all, in the same place. -You will feel like an imposter, like you don't belong, or like you are constantly behind. Or all three. It's normal. It will pass. (Well, sort of.) People of all ages go through this. Adviser related: -If you are lucky enough to get both research interest fit and personality fit perfect, congratulations! But sometimes, personality fit is more important than research interest fit as long as the research isn't too different. A great adviser is interested in your career development, likes you as a person, advocates for you, and wants to hear your ideas. Even if his or her research is quite different from yours, they may give you the autonomy to work on your own projects and just supervise you. A bad personality fit will drive you nuts, even if you love his or her research. Consider that when evaluating your adviser fit. (This will vary by field: research fit may be less important in the humanities, more important in the natural and physical sciences. Social sciences are somewhere in-between.) -Don't be afraid to be straight up blunt with your adviser when it comes to asking about your progress. Ask if you are where you should be both academic program wise and getting-a-job-after-this-mess-wise. -Be proactive. Advisers love when you draw up an agenda for your one-on-one meetings, come with talking points and progress to share, have concrete questions to ask, and have overall shown that you have been thoughtful and taken control of your own program. Of course, this won't immediately come easily to you, but in time you will work up to it. Every semester I type up my semester goals, and at the beginning of the year I type up annual goals. I show them to my adviser and we talk about whether they are too ambitious, or whether I need to revise them, and how I can meet them. -Don't expect your adviser to actually know what courses you have to take to graduate. They will know about comprehensive exams and the dissertation, but a lot of professors don't really keep up with the course requirements, especially if their program is in flux. Get you a student handbook, and find out what you need to take. Map it out in a grid, and check off things when you finish them. Show this to your adviser every semester. You may have to explain how such and such class fills a requirement. -Nobody loves you as much as you, except your mother. Keep this in mind as you take in advice from all sources, including your adviser. Your adviser is there to guide you, but that doesn't mean you have to do everything he says. Studying: -You will have to read more than you ever did before, in less time than you ever have before, and you will be expected to retain more than you ever have before. The way that you studied in undergrad may need some tweaking. Be prepared for this. -Corollary: you may find that your methods change with age or interests or time. I preferred to study alone in college, but in grad school, I prefer to study in groups. It keeps me on task and the socialization keeps me motivated. You may find that you shift from being a more auditory learner to a visual learner or whatever. -You will feel behind at first. This is normal. -At some point you will realize that your professors don't actually expect you to read everything they assign you. This, of course, will vary by program, but there will be at least one class where the reading is actually impossible to do in one week. The point is to read enough that you know the major themes and can talk intelligently about them, and then pick some of the readings to really dig into and think more deeply about. -For most programs, don't worry so much about grades. If you stay on top of your work and do what you're supposed to, you will probably get an A. How much grades matter varies from program to program. In some programs, a B is a signal that you are not up to par, and more than a few Bs will warrant a discussion with your adviser or the DGS. My program isn't like that - A, B, it's all meaningless. My adviser doesn't even know what my grades are. But at almost all programs, a C means you need to retake the course, and two Cs means you have to convince the DGS not to kick you out. Extracurricular activity: What's that? No, seriously: -A lot of your time will be unstructured. You will have coursework, but most grad classes meet once a week for two hours and you may have three classes. You may have meetings with your adviser every so often and some seminars or things to catch (like we have grand rounds and colloquia that are required), but a lot of time will be unstructured. However, since you have so much more work than you had in undergrad, you actually will have less free time than you had in undergrad. This may initially cause you great anxiety. It did for me. Some people love unstructured time, though. (I don't.) -Because of this, you'll have to be planful about your non-grad school related stuff. -TAKE TIME OFF. DO it. It's important for your mental health. However you do it doesn't matter. Some people work it like a 9-5 job. Some people take a day off per week (me) and maybe a few hours spread across the week. Some people work half days 7 days a week. However you do it, there needs to be a time when you say "f this, I'm going to the movies." -Find your happy place, something that keeps you the you you were when you came in. I love working out. It gives me energy and I feel good. I stay healthy. I also love reading fiction, so sometimes I just curl up with a good book, work be damned. You have to give yourself permission to not think about work, at least for a couple of hours a week. You may also discover new hobbies! (I never worked out before I came to graduate school.) -Your work will creep into all aspects of your life, if you let it. This is why I hate unstructured time. You will feel guilty for not doing something, because in graduate school, there is ALWAYS something you can do. ALWAYS. But since there will always be more work, there's no harm in putting it aside for tomorrow, as long as you don't have a deadline. -You may need to reach outside of your cohort for a social life. None of my close friends are in my doctoral cohort. I've met master's students in my program, master's students in other programs, and I know a few non-graduate students I hang out with, too. Go to graduate student mixers. (If your university doesn't have any, organize some, if you like planning parties.) Join a student group that doesn't take up too much time. I had a doctoral acquaintance who kinda laughed at me because I joined some student groups other than the doctoral student one, and I was usually the only doctoral student in those groups, but I met some close friends (and future job contacts) and had a good time. -DO NOT FEEL GUILTY FOR WANTING A LIFE OUTSIDE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL. This is paramount. This is important. You are a well-rounded, complex, multifaceted human being. NEVER feel bad for this. Everybody wants some kind of life outside of work. Yes, you may loooove your field, but that doesn't mean you want to do it all day long. Some other doctoral students, and perhaps professors, may make you feel bad about this. Don't let them. Just smile and nod. Then disappear when you need to. Career: -This is job preparation. Remember that from Day One. Always be looking for ways to enhance your skills. Read job ads and find out what's hot in your field, what's necessary, what's in demand. For example, in my field statistics and methods are a hot commodity, and they're not a passing fad. I happen to really like statistics and methods, so I have pursued that as a concentration of mine. -Don't be afraid to take on volunteer work and part-time gigs that will give you skills that will be useful both inside academia and out, as long as it's not against your contract. Your adviser may be against it, but he doesn't have to know as long as it doesn't interfere with your work. -If you want to work outside of academia - if you are even *considering* the possibility - please please definitely do the above. Even if you aren't considering it, consider the possibility that you won't get a tenure-track job out the box and that you may need to support yourself doing something else for a while. You will have to prove to employers that you have developed usable, useful skills and this is one of the easiest ways to do it. But don't overdo it - get the degree done. -For more academic related ones - always look for opportunities to present and publish. Presentations look good on your CV. Publications look better. When you write seminar papers, wonder if you can publish them with some revision. Write your seminar papers on what you maybe think you may want to do your dissertation on. Even if you look at them three years later and think "these suck," you can at least glean some useful references and pieces from them. Discuss publication with your adviser early and often, and if you have the time and desire, seek out publication options with other professors and researchers. But if you commit to a project, COMMIT. You don't want to leave a bad impression. -If you can afford it, occasionally go to conferences even if you aren't presenting. You can network, and you can hear some interesting talks, and you may think about new directions for your own research. You can also meet people who may tell you about jobs, money, opportunities, etc. -Always try to get someone else to pay for conference travel before you come out of pocket. Including your adviser. Do not be shy about asking if he or she can pay. If he can't, he'll just say no. Usually the department has a travel fund for students, but often it's only if you are presenting. -If you are interested in academia, you should get some teaching experience. There are two traditional ways to do this: TAing a course, and teaching as a sole instructor. If you can help it, I wouldn't recommend doing a sole instructor position until you are finished with coursework. Teaching takes a LOT of time to do right. You should definitely TA at least one course, and probably a few different ones. But don't overdo it, if you can help it, because again, it takes a LOT of time. More than you expect at the outset. If you are in the humanities, I think sole instructor positions are very important for nabbing jobs so when you are in the exam/ABD phase, you may want to try at least one. If your own university has none, look at adjuncting for nearby colleges, including community colleges. (I would wager that the majority of natural science/physical science students, and most social science students, have never sole taught a class before they get an assistant professor job. At least, it's not that common n my field, which straddles the social and natural sciences.) -Always look for money. Money is awesome. If you can fund yourself you can do what you want, within reason. Your university will be thrilled, your adviser will be happy, and you can put it on your CV. It's win-win-win! Don't put yourself out of the running before anyone else has a chance to. Apply even if you think you won't get it or the odds are against you (they always are), as long as you are eligible. Apply often. Apply even if it's only $500. (That's conference travel!) Money begets money. The more awards you get, the more awards you will get. They will get bigger over time. If you are in the sciences and social sciences, you should get practice writing at least one grant. You don't have to write the whole thing, but at least get in on the process so that you can see how it's done. Grant-writing is very valuable both in and outside of graduate school. -Revise your CV every so often. Then look and decide what you want to add to it. Then go get that thing, so you can add it. -The career office at big universities is often not just for undergrads. I was surprised to learn that my career center offers help on CV organization and the academic job search, as well as alternative/non-academic career searches for doctoral students. In fact, there are two people whose sole purpose it is to help PhD students find nonacademic careers, and they both have PhDs. This will vary by university - some universities will have very little for grad students. Find out before you write the office off. -It's never too early to go to seminars/workshops like "the academic job search inside and out", "creating the perfect CV," "getting the job," etc. NEVER. Often the leader will share tips that are more aimed towards early graduate students, or tidbits that are kind of too late for more advanced students to take care of. This will also help you keep a pulse on what's hot in your field. It'll help you know what lines you need to add to your CV. And they're interesting. Other: -Decide ahead of time what you are NOT willing to sacrifice on the altar of academia. Then stick to it. I'm serious. If you decide that you do NOT want to sacrifice your relationship, don't. If it's your geographical mobility, don't. I mean, be realistic, and realize that there will always be trade-offs. But you have to think about what's important to you for your quality of life, and realize that there is always more to you than graduate school. -If you don't want to be a professor, do not feel guilty about this. At all. Zero. However, you will have to do things differently than most doctoral students. Your adviser will probably never have worked outside of the academy (although this may vary depending on the field) so he may or may not be able to help you. But you have a special mission to seek out the kinds of experiences that will help you find a non-academic job. Test the waters with your adviser before you tell him this. My adviser was quite amenable to it, but that's because I told him that my goal was to still do research and policy work in my field just not at a university, AND because it's quite common in my field for doctoral students to do non-academic work. If you're in a field where it's not common (or where your professors refuse to believe it's common, or it's not supposed to be common)…well, you may be a little more on your own. -Every so often, you will need to reflect on the reasons you came to graduate school. Sometimes, just sit and think quietly. Why are you doing this to yourself? Do you love your field? Do you need this degree to do what you want to do? Usually the answer is yes and yes, and usually you'll keep on trucking. But sometimes when the chips are down you will need to reevaluate why you put yourself through this in the first place. -To my great dismay, depression is quite common in doctoral students. Graduate work can be isolating and stressful. Luckily your health insurance usually includes counseling sessions. TAKE THEM if you need them. Do not be ashamed. You may be surprised with who else is getting them. (I found out that everyone in my cohort, including me, was getting mental health counseling at a certain point.) Exercise can help, as can taking that mental health day once a week and just chilling. Don't be surprised if you get the blues… -…but be self-aware and able to recognize when the depression is clouding your ability to function. Doctoral programs have a 50% attrition rate, and this is rarely because that 50% is less intelligent than, less motivated than, less driven than, or less ambitious than the other 50% that stays. Often they realize that they are ridiculously unhappy in the field, or that they don't need the degree anymore, or that they'd rather focus on other things in life, or their interests have changed. All of this is okay! -You will, at some point, be like "eff this, I'm leaving." I think almost every doctoral student has thought about dropping out and just kicking this all to the curb. You need to listen to yourself, and find out whether it is idle thought (nothing to worry about, very normal) or whether you are truly unhappy to the point that you need to leave. Counseling can help you figure this out. -Don't be afraid to take a semester or a year off if you need to. That's what leaves of absence are for. Lastly, and positively… …graduate school is great! Seriously, when else will you ever have the time to study what you want for hours on end, talk to just as interested others about it, and live in an intellectual community of scholars and intellectuals? And occasionally wake up at 11 am and go to the bank at 2 pm? Sometimes you will want to pull out all of your hair but most of the time, you will feel fulfilled and wonderfully encouraged and edified. So enjoy this time!
  4. 20 points
    maelia8

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Just got notified - I got the research Fulbright to Germany!!!!!! Best possible news to wake up to here on the West coast <3 SO HAPPY!
  5. 20 points
    Yanaka

    2017 Acceptances

    Delighted to FINALLY be a legitimate poster here! I got into Villanova, yay!!!! I'm waiting to know more about funding (they said within the next two days) before getting extremely excited (I already texted all my friends), but I'm relieved to have received an acceptance, and no less from them
  6. 18 points
    LibbyCreek

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I got Hungary! Can't believe it!
  7. 17 points
    imogenshakes

    2017 Final Decisions

    I accepted my offer from UC Davis yesterday! I'm so excited and relieved. Much of the decision had to do with the area itself (better for me and my partner, easier for him to find a job) and funding (I found out recently that I actually have six years of funding there, which I didn't get anywhere else). Now onto the practicalities!
  8. 17 points
    positivitize

    2017 Acceptances

    I just received word that I've been accepted at the University of Indiana Bloomington's PhD program! This was my reach school--every other program that I applied to was just a MA. I am shell-shocked. I need to sit down. I AM SITTING DOWN. What is happening!
  9. 17 points
    biyutefulphlower

    2017 Acceptances

    I was accepted to the University of Florida today!!! I got the call while on the way to the airport and had to pull over/let my fiancé drive. I may cry on the plane... Also may have audibly squealed while talking with the DGS. (Super professional, I know.) Once I have more info, I'll be sure to share! Ahhhh so happy!!!
  10. 16 points
    So, I interviewed at Yale for sculpture. They ask you to do a formal presentation of your work to the students and faculty. I was not flustered, I spoke from the heart and hip about my practice. However, they took issue with me not having an arts degree. A faculty member had stated that my work was too emotional to critique, and that the work I presented containing my brother's ashes (though absolutely relevant to my research about "performative objects", and the feature of an entire conceptual exhibition) was a faux pas. I had gotten rejected from Yale. I interviewed at Columbia. I have not heard anything, and I realize that if I were to gain acceptance, I'd likely be a second or third choice after other artists have passed due to their high tuition. I had been conversing with faculty at UCLA and I had current grad students advocating on my behalf. I had gotten a rejection without even an interview. I know we all understand this sentiment; of feeling yourself and your practice under repetitive scrutiny and valuation, only to be confronted with the hard realization that some people have the ability to prevent you from moving forward. I had expected nothing as a self taught artist, then my morale was so high from the offer of interviews at these schools. I had thought, "finally, my god, thank you." Visions of vast studios and dynamic conversation of art critiques quickly populated my mind. I am an idealist, and as such I am consistently let down. The rejection had me reeling in self doubt, without any touchstone to regain my faith in the art world. How am I to function if my work is too emotional to critique? How am I to move forward from this? Truthfully, I have always done my best by proving people wrong. I realize that you should never ask permission for what others do not own. Your art is your's, your intention should be sincerely your own. If your work is not compatible with a program, that does not make it irrelevant, it simply means its different. I had an interview at Goldsmiths this morning, a radical mfa program that had seemed like a wildcard in my applications. I had spoke from the heart and the hip about my work. I was immediately granted admission. Every thing that these ivy leagues took issue with, they appreciated. Grad school is dating and you should find someone who loves you back.
  11. 16 points
    I think this is a good time for you to learn one of the first important lessons of being a graduate student: Stop comparing yourself to your peers. As you start graduate school, you are becoming a professional academic. Each one of us is going to go on very different paths in both our careers and our research focus etc. It is no longer logical or useful to simply compare things like GPA and GRE scores. These are only a very very small part of the decision making process. Remember that you don't know everything about these other accepted students and it is not right to judge them on these metrics only. In addition, not everything that appears on the Results database here is correct. There is no explicit question for research experience so many people don't really put their experience here (I didn't, for example). For my field in particular, the questions you get asked when filling in the Results Survey is almost completely useless: those factors are not really going to make a big difference in the admission decision. To answer your last question, yes, it makes sense to want to go to a school that will challenge you and will make you into the best researcher that you can be. However, no, I do not think the method you are using to judge the school is fair. You should not judge the school by the other people they accept especially if you do not know all the details of their profiles anyways. Remember the lesson: keep the process focused on yourself. Ask yourself: Will this school provide the resources you need to succeed? Never mind the other students accepted.
  12. 15 points
    positivitize

    Waitlist Movement

    Uh... holy shit. IU just funded my first year! Thank you @RydraWong!!
  13. 15 points
    jarp729

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I got Peru research!!!! 🇵🇪
  14. 15 points
    Obecalp

    HKS 2017

    Twas the Day 'Fore Admissions 'Twas the day 'fore admissions, and all through the forum, Not a person was working, they'd built quite a quorum. Their essays were written, with pride and with care, But would they get in? Not a one was aware. They paced through their offices and homes oh so stressed, While their little hearts beated away in their chests. They gnawed at their nails and rended their flesh, They rapped on their keyboards, and tapped at refresh. An email arrived! The time! It has come! Oh, no, wait, it's just a letter from mum. "Ugh, Mom!" they did shout. "Can't you see that I wait? For a letter from Harvard to come on this date?" And far off in Cambridge, the admissions committee, Laughed and sneered and guffawed without pity. They sipped on their mai tais and laughed at the plebs, "Having fun waiting, you dorks and you dweebs?" But at last they decided, long enough they had waited, They'd read and reread, discussed and debated. They gave off a shout and it rang through the city "Behold a decree from the admissions committee!" They turned to the students at The Grad Cafe Who'd fretted and talked, and stopped working all day, "We think you're quite swell, and you're so very cool Welcome to Harvard's John F. Kennedy School!"
  15. 15 points
    Neuro15

    Laying Down the truth, sorry, not sorry

    Well thanks for the honesty I suppose. I'm going to be blunt with you, so try to not take offense, but you seem awfully arrogant. Some of your points are valid and I agree with; there are currently too many PhDs being trained. At this rate it's not sustainable, it's simply not. But to say a PhD is not worthwhile unless you stay in academia is silly and myopic, and should someone choose industry over academia that does not make them any less of a scientist. Many PhDs are choosing industry and alternative careers simply because they find academia is not an attractive option. Being on an entirely soft money salary fighting tooth and nail for grants in order to feed your family isn't exactly everyone's idea of a stable career, and if you can't see that then perhaps you should reflect on the current climate of academia a bit more. You know what percentage of PhD graduates end up in tenure track positions? It's low. While academia was once the default path, it's quickly becoming just the opposite and schools are changing to reflect that. You are exactly the the type of person I am looking to avoid for rotations. I hope during the course of your training you take off your blinders, because your narrow mindedness is something that is not a great character trait.
  16. 15 points
    I have been taken off the waitlist at Umass Amherst and offered a fully funded place! (thanks to whoever declined!)
  17. 15 points
    Marcion

    PhD Applications Fall '17 Season

    I have accepted Stanford's offer. Game over. Peace!!!
  18. 14 points
    NoirFemme

    Fall 2017 applicants

    Seriously. This is going to be what future cycles take from the 2017 thread? Maybe some of the veterans need to chill if they can't interact with new people with some grace.
  19. 14 points
    AnthropologyNRT

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Admission offered from UT Austin today! After two years of rejection I have been admitted to all 3 programs I applied to. Keep on keeping on!
  20. 13 points
    blakec1988

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Just received an email notification of my acceptance as a Fulbright research scholar to Panama!
  21. 13 points
    Mossy.artist

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Me: >Opens computer >Sees there are 30+ new posts in the forum >Without even stopping to read what people said, open my email >See a P..see Congratulations... >Bring down the foundations of my house from jumping around and screaming at the top of my lungs scaring the crap out of my husband who's in the shower I'M GOING TO POLAND MOTHER FULBRIGHTERS!!!!!! >Sidenote: wanted to call mom, dad, and best friends to scream at them through the phone....NO ONE PICKS UP!!! WWWHHHHHHHHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Ok, now I'm going to go back and read everyone's posts. Congrats to everyone who got good news today!
  22. 13 points
    positivitize

    2017 Acceptances

    Just got off the phone with the DGS at Syracuse University. I've been accepted to their fully funded MA Program as one of their top choices! I can't believe that I have the good fortune to choose between 3 R1 programs. Everything is unreal.
  23. 13 points
    I got accepted to Stanford for Genetics!! I thought for sure after the interview that I didn't stand a chance. Best day ever!
  24. 13 points
    Congratulations to everyone so far! And to you guys who haven't gotten quite what you wanted; don't give up! I don't believe in the theory of No, rather I believe in No(t right now). So keep making the work and most importantly stay true to who you are and what motivates you and why you make art. I also wanted to share with you guys. I got admitted into SAIC with a full scholarship in sculpture!
  25. 13 points
    plume

    When will we hear!!!!

    I JUST GOT ACCEPTED INTO NAU'S FULL-TIME LEVELER TRACK!!!! I cried!!!!
  26. 12 points
    RydraWong

    2017 Final Decisions

    Just accepted a PhD offer from the University of Wisconsin-Madison! Thrilled to be done with the decision making process at last, and even more excited to start graduate studies there in the fall. Time to start looking for apartments and to go shopping for an actual winter wardrobe!!
  27. 12 points
    eadwacer

    2017 Final Decisions

    I just emailed the MA program at UBC with my official acceptance! I'm so excited! Honestly, my final decision happened yesterday when I read a course description on their website yesterday and it was so exciting and perfect for my research interests that I audibly gasped.
  28. 12 points
    Bumblebea

    New Rankings

    I agree with this. The rankings are, in part, a reflection of a hierarchical system that already exists. I don't think anyone on a hiring committee actually consults them before making decisions. I don't think any professional in the field worth his or her salt really gives them much thought or takes them seriously. However, the rankings are also a self-perpetuating truism and they become a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy. Berkeley remains the best because everyone assumes that Berkeley is the best. Is it really "the best"? In some things, probably. In other things, absolutely not. My bigger problem with the rankings, though, is the fact that they continue to be published year after year, and they rely on extremely sloppy methodology. They come from a survey distributed to DGSs and department chairs, and only 14% of those surveyed actually respond. I'm guessing that few of us would pick a hospital to have an experimental lifesaving treatment on the basis of rankings where only 14% of those surveyed responded. No--we'd go ask other professionals and seek out additional information. For English grad school, the stakes obviously aren't as high ... but IMO, it's absolutely irresponsible and maybe unethical that USNWR continues to recycle this lousy survey year after year after year and pretend that it represents anything other than a small number of people bothering to respond. And the rankings do matter, to some extent. Even though most professors and academics probably don't take them seriously, they're still out there. They determine which programs people apply to in greater numbers, and larger applicant pools translate into more competitive cohorts. Today's grad students are tomorrow's professors. I was a grad hopeful almost 10 years ago, and many of the people with whom I went through the process are now professors in a position to admit grad students or participate in a hiring process. Many of these people ten years ago believed that one's professional life would be forever determined by where one got into grad school. The process often "worked" for them, so they were eager to internalize those successes and attribute them to hard work and ability. I'm guessing--well, actually I know--that many of them still hold fast to the belief that programs are self-sorting and that certain jobs are appropriate only for people who went to certain schools. These beliefs don't go away simply because you become more educated. They tend to solidify and manifest in things like confirmation bias. So, I disagree that the rankings are democratizing. I think they're a natural thing--we all want to know where we fall in the hierarchy. But I also think that designing a much more comprehensive ranking system wouldn't be that difficult. Would it still suffer from problems of confirmation bias and perceived prestige? Of course. But it also might get at the nitty-gritty differences between programs in a way that would be more material than speculative. And the fact that no one has pursued this kind of survey is interesting indeed (to me, at least). I believe that there are a lot of people out there who still benefit from the status quo and don't really want a more democratic leveling of graduate programs.
  29. 12 points
    Lab6214

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    SPAİN CAME OUT AND I'M GOING!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  30. 12 points
    Happy to say I just accepted an offer of admission from one of my top choices and a top 20 school in my field. For all of those with low-GPAs, there is hope! Find a masters that will accept you... do extremely well and the door will open for Ph.D programs! EDIT: Also, thank you to this community for the great advice and support along the way!
  31. 12 points
    Accepted to Yale Sculpture!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  32. 12 points
    orphic_mel528

    2017 Final Decisions

    I'm still waiting on one program, but I've already made up my mind. UMASS it is! Very excited to work with Dr. Zucker and the rest of the people at MCIRS.
  33. 12 points
    erosanddust

    2017 Acceptances

    After waiting through a painful number of rejections, I woke up to an acceptance from the University of Toronto! Absolutely thrilled, and totally in shock since I was already steeling myself to apply again next year. @ThePomoHipster Congrats to you! Will I see you at the visit day?
  34. 12 points
    Another update: the lab I joined with plans of leaving May 2017 has now changed to my staying in the phd program. Yay!
  35. 11 points
    kclarkey

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Still can't believe that I got two emails yesterday! I'm going to Colombia
  36. 11 points
    Luka

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Got Georgian ETA!
  37. 11 points
    mckenna81

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    As expected, Trump did want to completely eliminate the Fulbright Program and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Fulbright has been spared, but only through reductions to other important international programs. Fuck everything about this administration. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/state-departments-28-percent-cuts-hit-foreign-aid-un-and-climate-change/2017/03/15/294d7ab8-0996-11e7-a15f-a58d4a988474_story.html?utm_term=.952bd6fb0bfa
  38. 11 points
    orphic_mel528

    New Rankings

    I think, aside from the absurdity of the methodologies used in these rankings, that all the prestige and ranking in the world won't help anyone who isn't willing to work hard and demonstrate their viability as a researcher and educator. To be clear, that's very much a general statement, by the way, and not aimed at anyone in particular--certainly not in this forum. However, the amount of anxiety I see over rankings and post-doc job prospects, and the relationship between these two things, is very troubling to me. If I can venture a guess, I would say that attending a top 20 program likely affords you connections and opportunities that others may not, but there are other ways to make a path for yourself. In 2014, I attended and presented at a conference in Australia at which one of the top-ranking Early Modernists in the world, from a top 10 program, was also in attendance. At the social gathering following the conference, he approached me and said he was impressed with my work. He asked me what doctoral programs I was applying to, and offered to put in a good word for me. At the time, I wasn't 100% sure I was going to go for a PhD, which I told him. I did my MA at a program that isn't even ranked, and I completed my BA at a university I affectionately/begrudgingly call a glorified community college. The point is: talent will out if you show it, and it will be recognized. This anxiety over rankings implies that the only way to job security is to get into a highly ranking program. I simply don't agree with that, and I think to have any anxiety over rankings developed from methodologies as shoddy as these is also unfair to yourselves. Any disadvantage, for lack of a better term, you might perceive you have because you're attending a low-ranked program can be compensated for. Anyway, that's my word as an Ancient One. I just hate to see anyone biting their nails off, thinking they're going to be unemployed and destitute because they didn't get into UPENN.
  39. 11 points
    Accepted to NYU with a 2.6 uGPA. Miracles happen.
  40. 11 points
    Guys I got into Columbia University Sculpture Program!!!!
  41. 11 points
    Sigaba

    Fall 2017 applicants

    What argument are you trying to make? What are you trying to achieve with these numerous posts? Is it your argument that you're under more stress than "typical" applicants? If one were to agree (for argument's sake) then the next questions might be how well are you handling that stress publicly? What does your public handling of your stress indicate about your ability to handle the additional stress of a doctoral program? Are you making the case that you could handle that additional stress independently, gracefully, and,ultimately, professionally? As for the "tiny bits of information," I think that you're trying to have it both ways. You make more of your private life public (and this tactic is a mistake) but when you don't get the response you want, you attempt to pull rank (as a single parent, as a potential homeowner, as a person with a graduate degree, as a person who has had health issues, as a person who has lost a beloved family member) and then you say that people don't have enough information. If you received the affirmation you clearly want, would you dismiss it by saying that it is based on "tiny bits of information"? Here's the deal. When graduate students are going through their qualifying exams (arguably a stressful experience), professors respond to explicit and implicit prompts for empathy with mockery and a cold grin. "Why so glum? When I took my quals, I had to walk to the department up hill ten miles both ways on a frozen road under a 110 degree sun after growing the trees and milling the paper on which I wrote my answers, in Old East Slavic, using my blood as ink and a gnawed fingernail as a quill." Or words to that effect. Regardless of what is said, the message is "Deal with it." (Well, in some cases, it's actually "Fuck you, deal with it.") "Deal with it" will be the same message professors send when you get bounced off the walls in seminar, when due dates fall in the same week, when a professor stands on your head in office hours for screwing up an essay, and when your schedule and your teaching responsibilities collide. What is your plan for when you're told to deal with it? Will it be similar to the one you're executing now? If so, please understand that professors will be watching and judging and, generally, doing so with a profound disinterest in the circumstances of your everyday life. (The disinterest will be especially ironic when when it comes from a social historian.) You, and at least one other person reading this--trainwreck of a sidebar--are misunderstanding the guidance being offered. You're not being told that you can't make it, or that you can't do it, or that you're not resilient, or that you're not worth it. You're being told by people further along the road that you're walking that the path gets harder and less certain. You're being told that NOW is the time to start steeling yourself for the tough sledding ahead. You're being told that airing your personal grief/anxiety/angst in a semi public place using your actual name is an exceptionally bad idea because you're seeking entry into programs run by some of the most imaginative and skilled researchers on the planet. You are being told that many of those academics view themselves as guardians of a profession under siege. You are being asked: are you sending a message that your up for this fight or are you sending another message?
  42. 11 points
    I just accepted Notre Dame's offer!!! I still haven't heard from from Toronto or Yale yet. My advisor told me not to assume they are rejections, so I'm trying not to. But the more I went over it in my head, the more I am convinced that Notre Dame is going to be the best place for me in so many different ways. Maybe I jumped the gun a bit, but I know I won't regret it. Now to celebrate!
  43. 11 points
    Captain Cabinets

    2017 Acceptances

    Holy shit, I just got into Oxford! Rejections from both Columbia and NYU, so yay this! Going to be biting my fingernails until I hear about funding (nominated by the English department for scholarship funding, but I'll have to wait for the Humanities division to make their final calls).
  44. 10 points
    Callen

    2017 Applicants Here!

    So relieved!! Just got my first acceptance from Milwaukee!
  45. 10 points
    moh230

    NEW Canadian universities M.S.W thread (2017)

    finally some good news! I got accepted to the University of Victoria for the post degree BSW. It's online, so hopefully, if nothing comes out of the 2 year MSW I can work full time and complete the 2 year program and then apply for the MSW!
  46. 10 points
    remenis

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I just got an email - awarded a Fulbright award to Spain (research)!
  47. 10 points
    Well I defended my thesis Friday and passed!! I have some edits but should be done by the end of the week AND, the reason I got on here, is that when I e-mailed WSU to let them know I had passed I got an e-mail back from my poi saying I'm at the top of the waitlist (knew I was waitlisted previously but didn't know my position)! There is still hope! Anyways now I'm hoping that someone tells them no and hopefully soon so this anxiety can pass. Good luck to everyone this week! Hopefully this week will have some good news
  48. 10 points
    fuzzylogician

    The Graduate School Ponzi Scheme

    Just walk away people, nothing to see here.
  49. 10 points
    jackdacjson

    Reactions to PhD Study

    @orphic_mel528, I'm out of reputation, but I wanted to say how sorry I am that someone you've known for so long would take that kind of tact. So often it seems to me that people on the outside of academic work have a set of responses, as though they're reading directly from a script, when talking about the academy, no matter the circumstances. It's rather bizarre, to me, that there is such a widespread assumption that academic work isn't or can't be real work, even as more and more people go to college and press their own children likewise to go to college, something that would be impossible were it not for those willing to get PhDs. The current higher educational system relies on people getting PhDs, and yet somehow it is shameful to do so? It's something I certainly don't understand. On the other hand, my father--a high school dropout who's worked with his hands his entire life (although he also does IT work sans degree)--remains completely baffled that he doesn't have to come up with money to put me through a PhD program. I've tried explaining several times that I only really applied to programs that would waive tuition and give me a stipend, but he remains worried about the debt he believes I will certainly accrue. People's assumptions re: academia are really strange.
  50. 9 points
    Horb

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Austria notified!!!!