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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/28/2017 in all areas

  1. 30 points
    TeaOverCoffee

    2017 Acceptances

    I'VE BEEN ACCEPTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND! Thank God! I cried in my office for an hour because this is the best news I've heard all year.
  2. 22 points
    psychlife4me

    Fall 2017 Clinical Psychology Applicants

    Accurate representation of me the past couple of days on this thread..
  3. 22 points
    Hey I didn't really know where to post this, but I just wanted to give a shout out to every potential grad student out there who is dealing with waiting for decisions AND having their plans potentially derailed by the immigration order yesterday. I'm NOT trying to make this political - I'm just throwing out some support during what has to be a difficult time for our fellow "waiting gamers."
  4. 19 points
    tvethiopia

    2017 Acceptances

    YESSSSS just got my first acceptance from UMass Amherst!!!!!!!!! the email wasn't even the actual acceptance letter, but was from the writing program looking to set up interviews for teaching associateships. however, the first line of the email is: "I was recently informed you were admitted into your graduate program. Congratulations!" SO FREAKING EXCITED!!!!!
  5. 19 points
    ThePomoHipster

    2017 Acceptances

    I finally got my first acceptance! UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA!!! After three rejections from US schools, this really feels like a dream! I'm so relieved!!!
  6. 17 points
    piers_plowman

    2017 Acceptances

    JUST GOT INTO BROWN AHHHHHHHHHH
  7. 16 points
    Wyatt's Terps

    2017 Acceptances

    Where's the ambivalence and confusion? When you boil it all down, it's a case of them letting you know when they're ready to let you know. It really is as simple as that. Ph.D. programs are making around a $100,000 investment (on average) in their acceptances...and I'm not even considering waived tuition and travel stipends in that approximation. You can rest assured that they have to be well-considered decisions from an institutional standpoint, and that simply has to be their first consideration...especially in a day and age where funding for our very field is rapidly dwindling. If this were a situation where you have no idea if they will ever let you know about acceptance / waitlist / rejection, that would be one thing...but that's simply not the case. You know that they HAVE to inform you by April 15th (with a few minor exceptions), so that is the frame that you're yearning for, and it already exists. In other words, it really does come down to being patient and respecting the process. I'm not going to say any more on this topic, as I'm frankly a little annoyed that this isn't just common sense. I recognize that emotions are running high right now, but be that as it may, I don't like this implication that programs need to kowtow and be utterly transparent about every facet of their process to their applicants. It's way too much to expect, and simply doesn't factor in the sheer enormity of the job admissions personnel have to do.
  8. 16 points
    Scarlet A+

    2017 Acceptances

    I got my first response/acceptance!! I'm officially accepted to University of Alabama's fully funded Masters program!! It comes with waived tuition, a $13,500 Graduate Assistant stipend and an $800 Loomis scholarship (per year). Hallelujah. One down, four more to go. It's just such a relief that no matter what happens, I am moving forward.
  9. 15 points
    Marcion

    PhD Applications Fall '17 Season

    I have accepted Stanford's offer. Game over. Peace!!!
  10. 15 points
    Wyatt's Terps

    2017 Acceptances

    Argh. I don't want to sound like a surly old man, but here's the thing... It's perfectly fine for you (us) as Ph.D. program hopefuls to be antsy about admission timelines. It's to be expected, really -- it's one of the biggest moments of our lives, and that's not hyperbole. BUT, you should also keep in mind that these admissions committees are often dealing with upward of 300 applications...and almost all of those applicants are in the same boat as you: worrying, antsy, emotional, on edge, and unsure of when they'll hear back. Admissions committees have an unenviable task, and while it's largely a mystery to us as to how they make their decisions (and it almost certainly varies by program), I just think that we have to respect that they do it the way they do it for a reason. Professors are usually busy at the best of times, and I can only imagine how hectic it is during this time of year when they're sitting on an adcom. Likewise, a DGS (and his/her staff) has to juggle all of these acceptances, rejections, and waitlists for a couple of months. All of this is to say that I completely understand the desire to know all of your options as soon as possible...but sometimes I worry that that desire starts to merge into an expectation that you are owed an answer right away. I simply think that you have to respect the process, and understand that adcoms have their reasons for doing the things they do the way they do them. They have to do their job...and it's a very hard job to do. Calls and emails from panicky applicants isn't going to speed up the process or change anything. I hope this doesn't come across as a rant. I don't mean it as a rant. I just want you to remember that, as difficult as the waiting process is for us, it's also difficult on the adcom side of things. Just try your best to be patient. ETA: Cross-posted with AnxiousGrad
  11. 15 points
    SamStone

    Acceptance Thread

    In at Georgetown! After being totally shut out last year, an offer feels good.
  12. 15 points
    byn

    Fall 2017 Clinical Psychology Applicants

    The arrogance and grandiosity in this response.. C'mon :/
  13. 15 points
    Wyatt's Terps

    2017 Acceptances

    Just booked my flight / hotel / rental car for OSU's day for admitted students. Things are getting real!
  14. 15 points
    juilletmercredi

    Advice for a first year PhD student

    About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a heartbeat. Another thing to keep in mind: a dog can be a great comfort when you're all stressed out over graduate school. Advice? Age: -Don't feel like you have nothing to offer just because you are younger. I was 22 when I started graduate school. You got accepted to the program for a reason, and chances are you are just as equipped as any older students are to successfully complete the program, just in a different way. -Your older classmates may be just as terrified as you. Talk to them. You have a lot in common. You are, after all, in the same place. -You will feel like an imposter, like you don't belong, or like you are constantly behind. Or all three. It's normal. It will pass. (Well, sort of.) People of all ages go through this. Adviser related: -If you are lucky enough to get both research interest fit and personality fit perfect, congratulations! But sometimes, personality fit is more important than research interest fit as long as the research isn't too different. A great adviser is interested in your career development, likes you as a person, advocates for you, and wants to hear your ideas. Even if his or her research is quite different from yours, they may give you the autonomy to work on your own projects and just supervise you. A bad personality fit will drive you nuts, even if you love his or her research. Consider that when evaluating your adviser fit. (This will vary by field: research fit may be less important in the humanities, more important in the natural and physical sciences. Social sciences are somewhere in-between.) -Don't be afraid to be straight up blunt with your adviser when it comes to asking about your progress. Ask if you are where you should be both academic program wise and getting-a-job-after-this-mess-wise. -Be proactive. Advisers love when you draw up an agenda for your one-on-one meetings, come with talking points and progress to share, have concrete questions to ask, and have overall shown that you have been thoughtful and taken control of your own program. Of course, this won't immediately come easily to you, but in time you will work up to it. Every semester I type up my semester goals, and at the beginning of the year I type up annual goals. I show them to my adviser and we talk about whether they are too ambitious, or whether I need to revise them, and how I can meet them. -Don't expect your adviser to actually know what courses you have to take to graduate. They will know about comprehensive exams and the dissertation, but a lot of professors don't really keep up with the course requirements, especially if their program is in flux. Get you a student handbook, and find out what you need to take. Map it out in a grid, and check off things when you finish them. Show this to your adviser every semester. You may have to explain how such and such class fills a requirement. -Nobody loves you as much as you, except your mother. Keep this in mind as you take in advice from all sources, including your adviser. Your adviser is there to guide you, but that doesn't mean you have to do everything he says. Studying: -You will have to read more than you ever did before, in less time than you ever have before, and you will be expected to retain more than you ever have before. The way that you studied in undergrad may need some tweaking. Be prepared for this. -Corollary: you may find that your methods change with age or interests or time. I preferred to study alone in college, but in grad school, I prefer to study in groups. It keeps me on task and the socialization keeps me motivated. You may find that you shift from being a more auditory learner to a visual learner or whatever. -You will feel behind at first. This is normal. -At some point you will realize that your professors don't actually expect you to read everything they assign you. This, of course, will vary by program, but there will be at least one class where the reading is actually impossible to do in one week. The point is to read enough that you know the major themes and can talk intelligently about them, and then pick some of the readings to really dig into and think more deeply about. -For most programs, don't worry so much about grades. If you stay on top of your work and do what you're supposed to, you will probably get an A. How much grades matter varies from program to program. In some programs, a B is a signal that you are not up to par, and more than a few Bs will warrant a discussion with your adviser or the DGS. My program isn't like that - A, B, it's all meaningless. My adviser doesn't even know what my grades are. But at almost all programs, a C means you need to retake the course, and two Cs means you have to convince the DGS not to kick you out. Extracurricular activity: What's that? No, seriously: -A lot of your time will be unstructured. You will have coursework, but most grad classes meet once a week for two hours and you may have three classes. You may have meetings with your adviser every so often and some seminars or things to catch (like we have grand rounds and colloquia that are required), but a lot of time will be unstructured. However, since you have so much more work than you had in undergrad, you actually will have less free time than you had in undergrad. This may initially cause you great anxiety. It did for me. Some people love unstructured time, though. (I don't.) -Because of this, you'll have to be planful about your non-grad school related stuff. -TAKE TIME OFF. DO it. It's important for your mental health. However you do it doesn't matter. Some people work it like a 9-5 job. Some people take a day off per week (me) and maybe a few hours spread across the week. Some people work half days 7 days a week. However you do it, there needs to be a time when you say "f this, I'm going to the movies." -Find your happy place, something that keeps you the you you were when you came in. I love working out. It gives me energy and I feel good. I stay healthy. I also love reading fiction, so sometimes I just curl up with a good book, work be damned. You have to give yourself permission to not think about work, at least for a couple of hours a week. You may also discover new hobbies! (I never worked out before I came to graduate school.) -Your work will creep into all aspects of your life, if you let it. This is why I hate unstructured time. You will feel guilty for not doing something, because in graduate school, there is ALWAYS something you can do. ALWAYS. But since there will always be more work, there's no harm in putting it aside for tomorrow, as long as you don't have a deadline. -You may need to reach outside of your cohort for a social life. None of my close friends are in my doctoral cohort. I've met master's students in my program, master's students in other programs, and I know a few non-graduate students I hang out with, too. Go to graduate student mixers. (If your university doesn't have any, organize some, if you like planning parties.) Join a student group that doesn't take up too much time. I had a doctoral acquaintance who kinda laughed at me because I joined some student groups other than the doctoral student one, and I was usually the only doctoral student in those groups, but I met some close friends (and future job contacts) and had a good time. -DO NOT FEEL GUILTY FOR WANTING A LIFE OUTSIDE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL. This is paramount. This is important. You are a well-rounded, complex, multifaceted human being. NEVER feel bad for this. Everybody wants some kind of life outside of work. Yes, you may loooove your field, but that doesn't mean you want to do it all day long. Some other doctoral students, and perhaps professors, may make you feel bad about this. Don't let them. Just smile and nod. Then disappear when you need to. Career: -This is job preparation. Remember that from Day One. Always be looking for ways to enhance your skills. Read job ads and find out what's hot in your field, what's necessary, what's in demand. For example, in my field statistics and methods are a hot commodity, and they're not a passing fad. I happen to really like statistics and methods, so I have pursued that as a concentration of mine. -Don't be afraid to take on volunteer work and part-time gigs that will give you skills that will be useful both inside academia and out, as long as it's not against your contract. Your adviser may be against it, but he doesn't have to know as long as it doesn't interfere with your work. -If you want to work outside of academia - if you are even *considering* the possibility - please please definitely do the above. Even if you aren't considering it, consider the possibility that you won't get a tenure-track job out the box and that you may need to support yourself doing something else for a while. You will have to prove to employers that you have developed usable, useful skills and this is one of the easiest ways to do it. But don't overdo it - get the degree done. -For more academic related ones - always look for opportunities to present and publish. Presentations look good on your CV. Publications look better. When you write seminar papers, wonder if you can publish them with some revision. Write your seminar papers on what you maybe think you may want to do your dissertation on. Even if you look at them three years later and think "these suck," you can at least glean some useful references and pieces from them. Discuss publication with your adviser early and often, and if you have the time and desire, seek out publication options with other professors and researchers. But if you commit to a project, COMMIT. You don't want to leave a bad impression. -If you can afford it, occasionally go to conferences even if you aren't presenting. You can network, and you can hear some interesting talks, and you may think about new directions for your own research. You can also meet people who may tell you about jobs, money, opportunities, etc. -Always try to get someone else to pay for conference travel before you come out of pocket. Including your adviser. Do not be shy about asking if he or she can pay. If he can't, he'll just say no. Usually the department has a travel fund for students, but often it's only if you are presenting. -If you are interested in academia, you should get some teaching experience. There are two traditional ways to do this: TAing a course, and teaching as a sole instructor. If you can help it, I wouldn't recommend doing a sole instructor position until you are finished with coursework. Teaching takes a LOT of time to do right. You should definitely TA at least one course, and probably a few different ones. But don't overdo it, if you can help it, because again, it takes a LOT of time. More than you expect at the outset. If you are in the humanities, I think sole instructor positions are very important for nabbing jobs so when you are in the exam/ABD phase, you may want to try at least one. If your own university has none, look at adjuncting for nearby colleges, including community colleges. (I would wager that the majority of natural science/physical science students, and most social science students, have never sole taught a class before they get an assistant professor job. At least, it's not that common n my field, which straddles the social and natural sciences.) -Always look for money. Money is awesome. If you can fund yourself you can do what you want, within reason. Your university will be thrilled, your adviser will be happy, and you can put it on your CV. It's win-win-win! Don't put yourself out of the running before anyone else has a chance to. Apply even if you think you won't get it or the odds are against you (they always are), as long as you are eligible. Apply often. Apply even if it's only $500. (That's conference travel!) Money begets money. The more awards you get, the more awards you will get. They will get bigger over time. If you are in the sciences and social sciences, you should get practice writing at least one grant. You don't have to write the whole thing, but at least get in on the process so that you can see how it's done. Grant-writing is very valuable both in and outside of graduate school. -Revise your CV every so often. Then look and decide what you want to add to it. Then go get that thing, so you can add it. -The career office at big universities is often not just for undergrads. I was surprised to learn that my career center offers help on CV organization and the academic job search, as well as alternative/non-academic career searches for doctoral students. In fact, there are two people whose sole purpose it is to help PhD students find nonacademic careers, and they both have PhDs. This will vary by university - some universities will have very little for grad students. Find out before you write the office off. -It's never too early to go to seminars/workshops like "the academic job search inside and out", "creating the perfect CV," "getting the job," etc. NEVER. Often the leader will share tips that are more aimed towards early graduate students, or tidbits that are kind of too late for more advanced students to take care of. This will also help you keep a pulse on what's hot in your field. It'll help you know what lines you need to add to your CV. And they're interesting. Other: -Decide ahead of time what you are NOT willing to sacrifice on the altar of academia. Then stick to it. I'm serious. If you decide that you do NOT want to sacrifice your relationship, don't. If it's your geographical mobility, don't. I mean, be realistic, and realize that there will always be trade-offs. But you have to think about what's important to you for your quality of life, and realize that there is always more to you than graduate school. -If you don't want to be a professor, do not feel guilty about this. At all. Zero. However, you will have to do things differently than most doctoral students. Your adviser will probably never have worked outside of the academy (although this may vary depending on the field) so he may or may not be able to help you. But you have a special mission to seek out the kinds of experiences that will help you find a non-academic job. Test the waters with your adviser before you tell him this. My adviser was quite amenable to it, but that's because I told him that my goal was to still do research and policy work in my field just not at a university, AND because it's quite common in my field for doctoral students to do non-academic work. If you're in a field where it's not common (or where your professors refuse to believe it's common, or it's not supposed to be common)…well, you may be a little more on your own. -Every so often, you will need to reflect on the reasons you came to graduate school. Sometimes, just sit and think quietly. Why are you doing this to yourself? Do you love your field? Do you need this degree to do what you want to do? Usually the answer is yes and yes, and usually you'll keep on trucking. But sometimes when the chips are down you will need to reevaluate why you put yourself through this in the first place. -To my great dismay, depression is quite common in doctoral students. Graduate work can be isolating and stressful. Luckily your health insurance usually includes counseling sessions. TAKE THEM if you need them. Do not be ashamed. You may be surprised with who else is getting them. (I found out that everyone in my cohort, including me, was getting mental health counseling at a certain point.) Exercise can help, as can taking that mental health day once a week and just chilling. Don't be surprised if you get the blues… -…but be self-aware and able to recognize when the depression is clouding your ability to function. Doctoral programs have a 50% attrition rate, and this is rarely because that 50% is less intelligent than, less motivated than, less driven than, or less ambitious than the other 50% that stays. Often they realize that they are ridiculously unhappy in the field, or that they don't need the degree anymore, or that they'd rather focus on other things in life, or their interests have changed. All of this is okay! -You will, at some point, be like "eff this, I'm leaving." I think almost every doctoral student has thought about dropping out and just kicking this all to the curb. You need to listen to yourself, and find out whether it is idle thought (nothing to worry about, very normal) or whether you are truly unhappy to the point that you need to leave. Counseling can help you figure this out. -Don't be afraid to take a semester or a year off if you need to. That's what leaves of absence are for. Lastly, and positively… …graduate school is great! Seriously, when else will you ever have the time to study what you want for hours on end, talk to just as interested others about it, and live in an intellectual community of scholars and intellectuals? And occasionally wake up at 11 am and go to the bank at 2 pm? Sometimes you will want to pull out all of your hair but most of the time, you will feel fulfilled and wonderfully encouraged and edified. So enjoy this time!
  15. 14 points
    I'm just going to do this; I know we've all tried to ignore you, but you're clearly not getting the picture so here goes. They're down voting you probably because they're sick of you trolling this forum after you graduated with your MSW a LONG time ago, then you go and complain to the mods because people are downvoting you. Maybe you should have considered your earlier behaviour in this forum (intimidating people who are applying to clinical programs, throwing around academic jargon as empty ammunition). Your pseudo-intellectual comments amused me and I had a good laugh btw. You use intersectionality to attack everyone else and it's sad. I'm sorry, but I've been following this thread for awhile and sometimes your comments are supportive (as they have been lately), but for the most part you're just stirring up people's emotions and trying to get negative reactions out of everyone. Why? It's pretty obvious most of the people here don't appreciate your 'insider tips', which include posting comments about low acceptance rates (what is the point of discouraging applicants?), when letters will go out (as if you have behind the scenes intel on what all the GTA schools are doing, LOL). Not to mention you constantly bashing clinical social work and those who want to pursue this field. No one has said anything to offend you and here you are just attacking those who are not like you (critical social work, anti-oppressive followers). Doesn't that go against the basic principles of anti-oppression? What are your intentions here, truly? Why are you constantly posting in here? Are you being helpful or harmful? Please seriously consider these questions. Stick to being supportive and leave all the rest of this crap out of here. We're supposed to be supporting each other. This thread is for APPLICANTS. Unless you have something substantial to say, without being offensive or passive-agreesive, stop looking for drama.
  16. 14 points
    Don't let numbers intimidate you. If these numbers are true, [I wouldn't bet that anything Yweang says is true, but I digress], then chances of getting in are less than 4% if they were picking people randomly like a lottery system. They are not picking people randomly like a lottery system, you have a greater chance of getting into the program than someone who is not as good a fit as you are. The acceptance rates for all programs are low, but keep in mind there are so many areas of your applications where you can stand out from the crowd. Low chance doesn't mean no chance, and there are a ton of MSW applications that come in from people very underqualified looking to get the degree as a "next step" because they don't know what else to do after their undergrad, people applying who don't really have a good understanding what social work is at all, and many more reasons that someone might make for a poor candidate. When I was applying to the program, I had 6 friends applying for clearly the wrong reasons, they didn't even get waitlisted. Trust in your experience, it is unique to you and has led you to where you are today: applying to work in one of the most wonderful fields out there. It's hard not to dwell on numbers and statistics when they're so scary and in your face, but as future social workers (and I have no doubt you are ALL future social workers), you would never reduce someone else to just a number, so don't do that to yourself. Hopefully you get in this round, if not, you'll find a way to make it work--if it is truly your calling, you will find a way. My practicum supervisor right now didn't get into the MSW until their 4th try and now they are working as a head social worker in a hospital department. The path to success isn't perfectly linear, most people have a few hiccups down the road, try your best to not let those hiccups stop your from continuing your journey. I am so excited to hear about your successes!
  17. 13 points
    natalielouise

    2017 Acceptances

    AHHHH just got an email from Heather Hicks at Villanova and I am IN!!! So thrilled after 3 rejections from PhD programs. Personal email with official offer to follow, funding decisions will be made after March 1st. I am so happy!!!! (English Masters program - it is not letting me post on the board for some reason - but I had to let you guys know!)
  18. 13 points
    LouisePlease

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    I tried to post this yesterday but I think the site was down. Happy late Valentine's Day to all ye GC dreamers and romantics! I hope your day was full of things you love, whether a person or a pizza or a poem that fills up your tired, anxious heart. In times like this, it's so important to take care of yourself and pause to recognize all the wonderful things in your life. Yesterday I thought a lot about the ways poetry and literature engender empathy and love. That everyone on this forum wants to dedicate their life to the study of it speaks volumes about your character and I'm proud to know you all. In recognition of love day, a favorite Poe quote of mine: "I was never really insane except upon occasions when my heart was touched."
  19. 13 points
    mereandtonks

    2017 Acceptances

    Got into Irvine! Got an email from DGS this morning apologizing for some of the letters going out late and causing confusion with his correction email. Any confusion is totally worth it at this point though! Holy crap, this was definitely a school I had totally taken myself out of the running for! So excited!!
  20. 13 points
    Wyatt's Terps

    2017 Acceptances

    But NOT a quiet day for snow dogs!!!
  21. 13 points
    csot

    Wine, Wait, and Whine

    I told my sister to order Chinese food because we didn't have anything to eat at home, and (I kid you not) this was my fortune.
  22. 13 points
    Sunsy

    2017 Acceptances

    Just got accepted into Berkeley!!!!!! I have no words still... Congratulations to everyone, and thanks being so supportive, positive, and all-around amazing!
  23. 12 points
    eadwacer

    2017 Acceptances

    GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.
  24. 12 points
    753982

    Venting Thread

    I really wish some of these schools would just reject the people they're going to reject at the same time they're accepting and waitlisting people so that those folks don't have to sit and wonder what's going to happen to their applications. I understand that unsuccessful applicants aren't prioritized as much, but I think it would really be appreciated.
  25. 12 points
    ricorico

    NYU or UC Berkeley?

    hey, this is the OP. First of all, you all were right, I shouldn't have been so confident; I didn't get into either Berkeley or NYU, unfortunately Lesson learned. But I did get in to one of my other top choices in California, which I'm really excited about too! Anyways, thanks to everyone for the critical feedback and sorry for writing an obnoxious post to begin with. Hope everyone else has had good luck this round...
  26. 12 points
    engphiledu

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Just wanted to express my gratitude to all the lovely people on these English forums. I glanced over at the History forum (my husband applied to a few programs), and it's really tense over there. Some applicants are being downright rude and degrading, or on the other end of the spectrum, arrogant and close-minded. I know there have been periods on this forum where some of us have disagreed. It's not always rainbows and sunshine, by an means. But, the outpouring of love both for fellow applicants who are struggling with rejections (or radio silence) as well as those who have received good news has reinforced my faith in what we do - the study and spread of humanity. Even as fellow competitors for a select few spots, we are able to build each other up and offer condolences/congratulations. By no means am I saying that the History folks (or any other boards) don't have this support network as well, and I think I've just happened upon a not-so-desirable, unfortunate argument. Overall, I think that's what GC is meant to be and primarily accomplishes. But, I wanted you all to know that I am privileged to be counted among such a group of individuals. Even though you are all in many ways strangers, I think that's what makes your unhesitating desire to send virtual encouragements even more amazing.
  27. 12 points
    KikiDelivery

    2017 Acceptances

    I got into Delaware!
  28. 11 points
    plume

    When will we hear!!!!

    I JUST GOT ACCEPTED INTO NAU'S FULL-TIME LEVELER TRACK!!!! I cried!!!!
  29. 11 points
    Marcion

    PhD Applications Fall '17 Season

    I had my interview and one hour later. I got in. I have been formally accepted into Stanford University!!!
  30. 11 points
    Comparativist

    accurate ranking of top polisci programs

    So you would rather trust prospective grad students opinions about something they haven't even experienced before rather than systematic surveys distributed to professors throughout the field? Well all know there are flaws with ranking systems but nonetheless they have been shown to correlate fairly well with placement.
  31. 11 points
    Big Ariana

    Meeting with professors during campus visit

    Their goal in these meetings is to court you and convince you to come to their department. This is true even if you have no other options and even if they know you have no other options. They are by no means interviewing you. If anything, you're interviewing them. It might be a bit of an overstatement to say you can do *no* wrong, but it's not that much of an overstatement. Nobody is going into these meetings with the mindset of making sure they didn't make a mistake on you, or trying to test your knowledge base. That said, philosophers in general can be pretty socially awkward, so don't be too surprised or discouraged if you don't get much more than "so, what do you want to talk about?" from some of them. Maybe the most useful question I asked professors was: so, what sorts of projects are your graduate students working on? This is a good question because it can give you a picture of the sorts of projects you could work on with that professor, and allows you to have a conversation with them about those sorts of projects without having to pretend like you already know what your dissertation project is going to be. I like asking this more than asking what that professor is working on, since some professors advise some dissertations on topics they've never published on, so it can give you a more full sense of their areas of interest than asking about their own work would. It's also useful because some professors only advise projects that perfectly line up with their interests, and that's good to know.
  32. 11 points
    orphic_mel528

    The PhD Lifestyle

    Please don't take this as being condescending, but I have to giggle at this a little. I'm 31 years old and I'm about to start my PhD. I got married when I was 27. It may be that in your community, people get married much younger, but virtually none of my Master's cohort was married or even in a serious relationship, and most were your age or a bit older (I was 26 when I started). The age at first marriage in the United States has been steadily increasing for a couple of decades or more. There will be plenty of people left in the dating pool, and what's better: they will likely be academics like yourself. That's the circle you're going to be moving in for the next five years. There will be plenty of opportunities to meet someone. Within your cohort, at the library, at conferences, special interest groups, in the community. You can decide for yourself whether I'm washed-up in the looks department. hahahaha
  33. 11 points
    dresdencodak

    2017 Applicant Profiles and Admissions Results

    Accepted to Cornell BBS! Definitely a huge relief, as this ended up being the only school I got an interview for. Was definitely thinking that things were really bleak a while ago but now that's all changed!
  34. 11 points
    ugurcanevci

    Welcome to the 2016-17 cycle!

    Claiming an official admission offer from UC Irvine! Oh it's a relief!
  35. 11 points
    Mippipopolous

    2017 Acceptances

    Notre Dame already got back to me before I even got home from the visit! I'm in, I was accepted! I am so unbelievably excited. The visit was incredible, they're a perfect fit for my interests and the department seemed wonderful. I'll definitely be accepting—I've heard back from everyone now already so makes my choice easy! Everyone at the weekend was amazing too, so it's great to know I'll be joining an awesome cohort! So excited I can't even believe it, it does't feel real!
  36. 11 points
    jkm871

    Questions for Graduate Programs

    Someone posted this list of questions to ask when visiting graduate programs on the Facebook group. With this person's permission, I am posting the list here, because I thought others who may not be part of the Facebook group might find it useful: Topics to ask grad schools: (1) What is the climate for women/minorities like? (2) Teacher accessibility (3) Opportunities to teach (TA vs. teaching) (4) Are grad students happy? (5) Placement / prep for job market? (6) Guaranteed 6th year of funding? (7) How long does it take people to complete program? (8) Teaching workload (how many students; grading help if a lot) (9) Summer opportunities (10) Transition from coursework to dissertation (11) Opportunities to do Phil outside classroom (12) Course selection Questions to ask professors: 1. Are there opportunities to teach or only TA? 2. How does [school] prepare students for the job market? 3. What is financial support like beyond the fifth year? 4. How long does it take people to complete the program? 5. What is the teaching workload like? (How many students? Is there grading help (if a lot)? / How onerous is the teaching + grading load?) 6. What summer opportunities are available to students? What do students typically do over the summer? 7. How does [school] handle the transition from coursework to dissertation? 8. What opportunities are there to do philosophy outside f the classroom on campus? (E.g. reading groups, talks, philosophy society, school-sponsored philosophy conference, etc.) 9. How is the collection of the department library? How often is it updated? 10. Do all grad students /TAs get office space? 11. Links of the dept with professors in linguistics and other areas of cognitive science? 12. What do people typically do in winter and summer vacations? 13. People retiring in the next 2-3 years? New hirings planned in the next 1-2 years? 14. How many students is [professor] planning to take in the next few years? 15. Proto seminar- what is it like and what will it look like this fall semester? 16. Support for publishing in the initial years at _______ university? 17. Department fellowships which one can apply for later which can give time off teaching? 18. Your (professor's) current research interests and upcoming projects? 19. How often do the professors meet with students especially during the coursework stage? 20. Do professors come to reading groups and other department activity apart from colloquia? 21. What is the level of support available from the Department to attend conferences, workshops and seminars? How far does the stipend go in that area? 22. Is the funding 9 month or 12 month? What are the avenues for summer funding? Questions to ask grad students: 1. How often do you meet with professors? 2. How often do you talk about philosophy with professors when you're not in meetings/classes? (To develop as a philosopher, it is very important to develop your in-person philosophy skills--thinking on your feet, asking good questions, responding to objections, etc.) 3. Do professors come to reading groups? (Or any departmental events that aren't colloquia?) 4. Do grad students ask questions at colloquia? 5. Do you feel comfortable talking in group settings? Have you felt comfortable talking in group settings since you first came? If not, when did you start feeling comfortable? 6. Do grad students share their work with one another/give feedback with one another? 7. How often are people around the department? 8. What do you like most about being here? 9. What do you like least about being here? 10. Do older grad students spend time around the department? 11. What kind of guidance do you get from your professors/advisor? (very important- you want faculty who really read your stuff carefully and make your papers better. if the faculty are mia or not very careful when they read your papers, you may not get this.) 12. Does the culture feel combative or one-up-y? Do you feel like you have to be "on" when you're in a philosophical setting? 13. Are the students here happy? 14. What are faculty and student working on in [area]? What is doing [area, e.g. metaphysics] like here? Questions about climate: 1. Is there a MAP chapter? (You can usually find this out yourself) 1. If so, contact MAP coordinator 2. What is the climate like at [school]? 3. What has [school] done for women and minorities in philosophy? 4. What percentage of grad students are women? 5. Sexual harassment issues? [prob best to ask a grad student discretely]
  37. 11 points
    Schopenhauerfanboy

    Acceptance Thread

    Got accepted into the University of Tennessee, Knoxville - full funding for 5 years! Haven't heard anything from the 11 other programs to which I applied..
  38. 11 points
    KikiDelivery

    2017 Acceptances

    I got into Pittsburgh! One of my dream schools! I am so happy!
  39. 11 points
    FeetInTheSky

    2017 Acceptances

    When you get a phone call from an unfamiliar number with an area code that may match up to one of your schools.... and it's a telemarketer. This week is going to kill me.
  40. 11 points
    Kilos

    2017 Acceptances

    Got a phone call from one of my academic/professional heroes Saturday afternoon; she was letting me know that Carnegie Mellon was excited to offer me a spot in their Rhetoric M.A. program. I'd applied for the Ph.D., but she very kindly explained that they only take 2-3 people into their Ph.D. program per year, and that those admitted almost always have graduate degrees (typically from CMU's own M.A. program). I knew this was the case before I applied, but the huge difference is that the Ph.D. program comes with a full tuition waiver. We had a really nice conversation (almost half an hour) and she got me really excited about an amazing program that I know I ultimately can't afford. If anybody's curious, I think CMU's tuition is around 42k a year. They offered me a very significant scholarship and an RA-ship, but it would still leave me on the hook for a chunk of money (over 10 grand). Before I'd even started this application process I promised myself that I wouldn't pay for graduate school; if I can get a full-ride I'll take it, but I'm not paying for relocation, housing, tuition, etc. I told her I'd be considering it (which I genuinely will, as it's just about my top choice); she told me that another POI would be calling me this week, and that they'd be in touch with further info and an official offer letter, and that was that!
  41. 10 points
    Some brief concluding thoughts as I check out of this year's admission cycle. I found this site very useful throughout the application process. I trawled it when I was a younger undergrad interested in grad school, and it was a good relief valve during the application season. Not many of my friends and peers apply to graduate school, not least sociology, so it was great to have the forum. My experience is anecdotal of course, but I hope people glean something from it. I applied to 14 schools in this cycle, and I was accepted to 5. All of them were ranked in the top 20. While I wasn't admitted to some of my top choice programs (namely, Harvard and Berkeley), I do have great options available. I'm writing this in the wake of a few rejections, so there may be a strain of ambivalence to my words, but I know that in more sober moments I am very thankful and humbled to have the options I do. I have a reasonably strong application profile. Without identifying myself, I come from a top 10 liberal arts college. I'm currently a senior. My GPA is within the summa/magna cum lauda range. My GRE scores (verbal/quant/writing) are above the 90th percentile. I have worked as a research assistant, and have dabbled in an independent summer research. I applied only to top ranked programs that were strong in what I was interested in (culture/theory/networks). I thought I made a strong case for my admission in each case, but as you can see, I was far from uniformly successful. I'm passing on tips and advice that I have accumulated from all over. Make sure your file is as strong as it can reasonably be. Low test scores can entirely break through application (though high ones don't necessarily make it). Prestige and status of your undergraduate institution matters. There might be very little you can do to change and affect this, but it is wise to cognizant of its effects on your application, and to try to accommodate for this as best as you can. Network early and often with your letter writers. Make sure they know who you are, and how/why you're dedicated to a career in academia. Apply widely! You cannot apply to just a select few and expect to get in, unless you're a bona fide star (and perhaps, even if). I imagine my application profile does not look too dissimilar to that of the modal "good" applicant: in which case you might expect a similar result from mine. Start early! Start preparing your writing sample and personal statements by June, if you can. I started in September or so, and I wish I had started earlier.
  42. 10 points
    Schopenhauerfanboy

    Venting Thread

    I'm not superstitious, but my horoscope uncannily captured the experience of waiting to hear back from grad schools: "You must wait for authorities to make a decision about your future, before your real work can begin."
  43. 10 points
    Mippipopolous

    2017 Final Decisions

    A few people suggested in the acceptances thread that it might be a good time to get the ball rolling on a separate decisions thread! So, if you feel comfortable share which school you've decided on here! What were the biggest factors in your decision? How incredibly excited are you to have made it through to the finish line? If you're having trouble making a final choice feel free to mull it over here too! It can be a nice way to network with future classmates as well. And of course it's a space to celebrate each other and all the hard work everyone put into this process! To start us off, I'll be heading to Notre Dame next fall! They were always one of my top choices, so I'm incredibly excited to have gotten an offer. There are numerous faculty who are great fits for my research interests, their funding is very generous, service free years one and five, and all kinds of great resources. My other offer was unfunded, and although I was waitlisted for two great programs they wouldn't really have been able to beat Notre Dame's offer or fit for me. I also fell in love with the school and department while visiting for recruitment! So ultimately wasn't too tough a choice for me. It's also closest to my family which is a nice perk. All in all I am very excited with my decision! Looking forward to hearing where everyone ends up!
  44. 10 points
    Just got an acceptance e-mail from Princeton!!!! So idk about those calls from Princeton/Harvard!
  45. 10 points
    rheya19

    PhD Applications Fall '17 Season

    YAAAY! Finally! Interview with Iowa next week!!! YAAAAAY!!!!
  46. 10 points
    ProfessionalNerd

    2017 Acceptances

    I GOT INTO CORNELL!!!! WHATTTT?!?!? MY GOSH!!!
  47. 10 points
    yanicus

    2017 Acceptances

    It wasn't me who posted on the results page, but yes I did get a call from Princeton! More importantly, thank you guys so much for being so supportive - actually, as someone who had a long winding path to getting here (won't get into details), it means a lot to me to feel welcomed and validated in the wonderful English community, both all of you here and also all the incredible people I've talked to and met in this journey.
  48. 10 points
    cosiva

    2017 Applicant Profiles and Admissions Results

    Just got a call from a professor at UCSF that I got into Tetrad
  49. 10 points
    Sunsy

    2017 Acceptances

    AHHHH I GOT INTO HOPKINS!!!!!!! I'm shaking and freaking out you guys. This is a dream come true, especially since my brother is there now getting his PhD!
  50. 10 points