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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/23/2017 in all areas

  1. 27 points
    Horb

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I GOT IT OMG I AM DYING!
  2. 20 points
    maelia8

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Just got notified - I got the research Fulbright to Germany!!!!!! Best possible news to wake up to here on the West coast <3 SO HAPPY!
  3. 19 points
    imogenshakes

    2017 Final Decisions

    I accepted my offer from UC Davis yesterday! I'm so excited and relieved. Much of the decision had to do with the area itself (better for me and my partner, easier for him to find a job) and funding (I found out recently that I actually have six years of funding there, which I didn't get anywhere else). Now onto the practicalities!
  4. 16 points
    positivitize

    Waitlist Movement

    Uh... holy shit. IU just funded my first year! Thank you @RydraWong!!
  5. 15 points
    Sunsy

    2017 Final Decisions

    Now that all my visits are finally over, UC Berkeley is the winner! Couldn't be happier about it, especially since everything I saw at the visit was extremely positive and welcoming.
  6. 13 points
    RydraWong

    2017 Final Decisions

    Just accepted a PhD offer from the University of Wisconsin-Madison! Thrilled to be done with the decision making process at last, and even more excited to start graduate studies there in the fall. Time to start looking for apartments and to go shopping for an actual winter wardrobe!!
  7. 11 points
    SAIC shantay you stay. Columbia you are the land of tuition for kings and queens. Now, sashay away.
  8. 11 points
    Sigwarz

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Going to have a drink tonight for this forum. I have never been so engaged in a dialogue with as much momentum as i did this. Everyone here was so friendly and helpful, and reminded me of why i chose to pursue graduate school in the first place. To be surrounded by like-minded scholars such as you guys makes the world of a difference in me continuing to work hard and strive for higher education. Also, that google spreadsheet was impressive. Wow! The force is real. If the planets are aligned right, I hope to run into some of you in the future. Cheers. Don't stop reaching for those goals. If you have come this far, you have come a long way.
  9. 9 points
    thepictureisstill

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Today will be the day.
  10. 9 points
    erosanddust

    2017 Final Decisions

    I accepted my offer from University of Toronto! My application season had a rather rocky start, so I'm thrilled that I'll be attending a strong and exciting program that has proven to be a great fit for me.
  11. 9 points
    slpslpslpbc

    2017 Canadian Application Thread!

    My boss, who is a SLP, just told me this: Accepted:Immediately- Drink joyously. Waitlisted:Immediately- Drink nervously. Rejected:Immediately- Drink to get wasted. That's my plan.
  12. 9 points
    pengpolaruin

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    IM GOING TO KOREA ETA AND IM CRYING OMG
  13. 9 points
    theanine

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I GOT IT! There are literal tears in my eyes.
  14. 7 points
    For those of you who have been rejected/waitlisted, and you feel it's because of a low GPA, don't be discouraged!! Contrary to popular belief, UofT does actually look beyond the GPA, and my acceptance this year is proof of that. I was rejected to the program in 2014 and I thought for sure it was because of my grades (last 2 years were in the B/B+ range). That being said, I also didn't have much experience in the field, given that I was just coming out of undergrad. So, for those of you wondering what you can do to improve your application, here is what I did (it might work for you too!): As soon as I got the rejection from UofT, I enrolled in George Brown's fast-track Social Service Worker program (it's a summer, plus one year ... similar to Lakehead's HBSW). I did a placement through that program, and was soon hired on as casual staff, and later on, part-time staff. Through a connection at the SSW program, I got involved with a volunteer project at the City of Toronto This next piece I will hugely emphasize, as UofT is highly research focused: I spent over a year volunteering in a research lab, getting authorship on publications, presentations, etc. *Tip for UofT personal statements: mention wanting to do a thesis - even though only 3 students get to do one, UofT loves the idea of having social workers become researchers/academics, as it's quite rare. This was a tip I received from one of the faculty there, and it was very useful. I continued to work on my professional development, getting certifications in UMAB, harm reduction, etc. I then received a full-time job in the field It's all a process, and like previous posters have mentioned, if social work is what you're meant to do, you'll get there Just remember, GPA isn't everything, and I can't emphasize that enough, especially since when I was applying, people repeatedly told me that the school was "too elite" for what my grades were. *not amused*.
  15. 7 points
    Bev_TO

    NEW Canadian universities M.S.W thread (2017)

    In terms of 1 year BSWs in Ontario, folks, here's what I found from calling and talking to all the admissions coordinators - thought this info may be useful to everyone: 1) Waterloo - not really a 1 year. They call it a 1 year, but you need to almost an entire year worth of pre-requisite Social Work Courses. You can register as a non-degree student and take most of them online, but you'll be paying for each course. So it doesn't seem financially feasible. You can take some of the pre-reqs then apply for conditional offer to their "1-year" BSW program 2) York - it's a MINIMUM 2-year program as was mentioned in the information session. They say 2-years full time. It's a post-degree program and requires a cumulative mid-B GPA. That's 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 3) Lakehead - post-grad HBSW can be done at either Orillia or Thunder Bay Campus. The tuition is 11k - 12 k because the school year starts in July (YES - Summertime) and ends at the end of June the following year. So its fee structure is based on a per course sort of system - as I have been told by former Lakehead students. It is indeed a 1-year full year program - so the tuition is seemingly high. Their application process is said to be the most holistic - in that they don't put all the emphasis on the marks. They do require a 70% or higher in your final 10 full year credit courses. Hope this helps. For all of you who didn't get in. Don't lose hope. I'll tell you I have the lowest undergrad GPA I have ever heard of getting into graduate school... And to be honest, I thought applying to U of T was a long shot. What I lacked in academic prowess, I made up for in 9 years of experience with a number of social justice organizations ranging from advocacy, activism, working with diverse groups from marginalized communities. I have worked with survivors of violence, mental health & trauma, children and youth, elderly populations, populations struggling with food security, newcomers and racialized people. If you didn't get in this year, take this year to really put yourself out there and work in what you're interested in. Diversify and network and expand your working opportunities. When the time comes to write your written statement, you will be able to speak directly from your experience - and that authenticity will shine through. You have an entire year to come back - and if you really believe that social work is for you, you will make it happen.
  16. 7 points
    thepictureisstill

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Fulbright lives on to tease another day.
  17. 7 points
    Ibycus

    Attn: Berkeley Admits

    I feel it's my duty to share this article with anyone who has been admitted to UC-Berkeley (or might be admitted off the waitlist). Not gonna comment beyond that since this article is my only familiarity with the situation: https://www.buzzfeed.com/katiejmbaker/famous-philosophy-professor-accused-sexual-harassment?utm_term=.lj4Y5eXnk#.sfWdE3b15
  18. 7 points
    (Obviously can't speak to UofT2015's experiences but wanted to throw in my 2 cents). I did my undergrad in psychology and minored in gender studies, the majority of people in the 2 year program do psychology or sociology undergrads but there are lots of other academic backgrounds as well. In terms of transition, it was an interesting one. I went straight from undergrad to grad school, my undergrad was all about memorizing textbooks to write exams, grad school = all papers, no memorization. The first semester of the MSW program is definitely considered to be the most challenging of the 2 years, with lots of papers/assignments due constantly. Second semester tones it down a bit but is still quite demanding given the course load (5 courses, 2 major papers due for each one, = 10 papers). In terms of the transition from undergrad to grad school, one thing that myself and my friends found was that while the program is demanding during the first year...it's not hard. I'm queen of writing full paper's the night before the due date and have not gotten a grade lower than A- on anything (and I'm by no means a great writer). The stakes are very low. In undergrad the stress is SO REAL because every paper you write and exam you take makes you freak out about how the mark may affect your chances of getting into grad school...but in grad school, it's pretty much the end goal (unless you want to do your phd one day), and that makes it more relaxed. Also, to be honest, a sentiment that I hear expressed over and over and over again from my peers is that you don't learn a whole lot from the courses. I will be finishing the program in a couple of weeks and I'm a completely different person from when I started it, I've learned SO MUCH and feel super confident entering the world of Social Work...but 90% of that learning and skill development came from my 2 practicums. Classes give you some foundation, but they're really not central to your learning in the MSW program, there's only so much you can learn from a book. TL/DR: first year of the MSW program is demanding, but the stakes are low which makes it more relaxed and profs are easy markers. Get excited for practicums because that's where most of the learning happens! Pictured below is a pic I just took from my agenda from 1st year of the last few weeks of October.
  19. 7 points
    Scheherazade

    Fall 2017 MFA

    Although I'm still waiting on two notifications, all the programs to which I applied have finished notifying fiction acceptances. Both of these programs historically notify rejections in April, so it might be a few weeks before I get my official rejections. But for the sake of my sanity, I'm closing the book on this application season. I'm not going to lie: these rejections hurt. It took me years to muster the courage to pursue my dreams, and each rejection eroded my hope that I would ever realize these dreams. After putting hundreds of hours into work that seemed to amount to nothing, I felt like a failure. But these rejections are only a comment on my application, not a referendum on my talent, worth, or dedication as a writer. Although some things were wasted, like the money I spent on application fees and the time I spent filling out application forms, these are minor expenditures in the long run. Working on my writing sample and personal statement, despite not getting me into graduate school, helped me hone my skills and define my goals. It's also important to remember that the MFA is only one way, and not necessarily the best way, to achieve success as a writer. A few weeks ago, when I realized my slim chances of admission, I started pursuing other avenues. Earlier this week, after receiving my ninth rejection, I found out that I was a finalist for a life-changing journalism opportunity that I thought I had no chance at. So don't lose hope: you may not have gotten your break yet, but that doesn't mean you never will. Keep hoping. Keep trying. And keep writing.
  20. 7 points
    rosee12

    NEW Canadian universities M.S.W thread (2017)

    Hi, wondering if I can get some feedback about this. I checked my mail today and didn't get anything. However, when I signed in on acorn just now (I'm a past uoft student which is why I can log on), it says "invited" to "sw msw 2 2017-2018 fall/winter" under the Degree Registration Status. My sgs account still says "under review". I'm hoping this means I'm accepted and hopefully not a mistake (or illusion haha)?? *knock on wood*.
  21. 7 points
    juilletmercredi

    Advice for a first year PhD student

    About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a heartbeat. Another thing to keep in mind: a dog can be a great comfort when you're all stressed out over graduate school. Advice? Age: -Don't feel like you have nothing to offer just because you are younger. I was 22 when I started graduate school. You got accepted to the program for a reason, and chances are you are just as equipped as any older students are to successfully complete the program, just in a different way. -Your older classmates may be just as terrified as you. Talk to them. You have a lot in common. You are, after all, in the same place. -You will feel like an imposter, like you don't belong, or like you are constantly behind. Or all three. It's normal. It will pass. (Well, sort of.) People of all ages go through this. Adviser related: -If you are lucky enough to get both research interest fit and personality fit perfect, congratulations! But sometimes, personality fit is more important than research interest fit as long as the research isn't too different. A great adviser is interested in your career development, likes you as a person, advocates for you, and wants to hear your ideas. Even if his or her research is quite different from yours, they may give you the autonomy to work on your own projects and just supervise you. A bad personality fit will drive you nuts, even if you love his or her research. Consider that when evaluating your adviser fit. (This will vary by field: research fit may be less important in the humanities, more important in the natural and physical sciences. Social sciences are somewhere in-between.) -Don't be afraid to be straight up blunt with your adviser when it comes to asking about your progress. Ask if you are where you should be both academic program wise and getting-a-job-after-this-mess-wise. -Be proactive. Advisers love when you draw up an agenda for your one-on-one meetings, come with talking points and progress to share, have concrete questions to ask, and have overall shown that you have been thoughtful and taken control of your own program. Of course, this won't immediately come easily to you, but in time you will work up to it. Every semester I type up my semester goals, and at the beginning of the year I type up annual goals. I show them to my adviser and we talk about whether they are too ambitious, or whether I need to revise them, and how I can meet them. -Don't expect your adviser to actually know what courses you have to take to graduate. They will know about comprehensive exams and the dissertation, but a lot of professors don't really keep up with the course requirements, especially if their program is in flux. Get you a student handbook, and find out what you need to take. Map it out in a grid, and check off things when you finish them. Show this to your adviser every semester. You may have to explain how such and such class fills a requirement. -Nobody loves you as much as you, except your mother. Keep this in mind as you take in advice from all sources, including your adviser. Your adviser is there to guide you, but that doesn't mean you have to do everything he says. Studying: -You will have to read more than you ever did before, in less time than you ever have before, and you will be expected to retain more than you ever have before. The way that you studied in undergrad may need some tweaking. Be prepared for this. -Corollary: you may find that your methods change with age or interests or time. I preferred to study alone in college, but in grad school, I prefer to study in groups. It keeps me on task and the socialization keeps me motivated. You may find that you shift from being a more auditory learner to a visual learner or whatever. -You will feel behind at first. This is normal. -At some point you will realize that your professors don't actually expect you to read everything they assign you. This, of course, will vary by program, but there will be at least one class where the reading is actually impossible to do in one week. The point is to read enough that you know the major themes and can talk intelligently about them, and then pick some of the readings to really dig into and think more deeply about. -For most programs, don't worry so much about grades. If you stay on top of your work and do what you're supposed to, you will probably get an A. How much grades matter varies from program to program. In some programs, a B is a signal that you are not up to par, and more than a few Bs will warrant a discussion with your adviser or the DGS. My program isn't like that - A, B, it's all meaningless. My adviser doesn't even know what my grades are. But at almost all programs, a C means you need to retake the course, and two Cs means you have to convince the DGS not to kick you out. Extracurricular activity: What's that? No, seriously: -A lot of your time will be unstructured. You will have coursework, but most grad classes meet once a week for two hours and you may have three classes. You may have meetings with your adviser every so often and some seminars or things to catch (like we have grand rounds and colloquia that are required), but a lot of time will be unstructured. However, since you have so much more work than you had in undergrad, you actually will have less free time than you had in undergrad. This may initially cause you great anxiety. It did for me. Some people love unstructured time, though. (I don't.) -Because of this, you'll have to be planful about your non-grad school related stuff. -TAKE TIME OFF. DO it. It's important for your mental health. However you do it doesn't matter. Some people work it like a 9-5 job. Some people take a day off per week (me) and maybe a few hours spread across the week. Some people work half days 7 days a week. However you do it, there needs to be a time when you say "f this, I'm going to the movies." -Find your happy place, something that keeps you the you you were when you came in. I love working out. It gives me energy and I feel good. I stay healthy. I also love reading fiction, so sometimes I just curl up with a good book, work be damned. You have to give yourself permission to not think about work, at least for a couple of hours a week. You may also discover new hobbies! (I never worked out before I came to graduate school.) -Your work will creep into all aspects of your life, if you let it. This is why I hate unstructured time. You will feel guilty for not doing something, because in graduate school, there is ALWAYS something you can do. ALWAYS. But since there will always be more work, there's no harm in putting it aside for tomorrow, as long as you don't have a deadline. -You may need to reach outside of your cohort for a social life. None of my close friends are in my doctoral cohort. I've met master's students in my program, master's students in other programs, and I know a few non-graduate students I hang out with, too. Go to graduate student mixers. (If your university doesn't have any, organize some, if you like planning parties.) Join a student group that doesn't take up too much time. I had a doctoral acquaintance who kinda laughed at me because I joined some student groups other than the doctoral student one, and I was usually the only doctoral student in those groups, but I met some close friends (and future job contacts) and had a good time. -DO NOT FEEL GUILTY FOR WANTING A LIFE OUTSIDE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL. This is paramount. This is important. You are a well-rounded, complex, multifaceted human being. NEVER feel bad for this. Everybody wants some kind of life outside of work. Yes, you may loooove your field, but that doesn't mean you want to do it all day long. Some other doctoral students, and perhaps professors, may make you feel bad about this. Don't let them. Just smile and nod. Then disappear when you need to. Career: -This is job preparation. Remember that from Day One. Always be looking for ways to enhance your skills. Read job ads and find out what's hot in your field, what's necessary, what's in demand. For example, in my field statistics and methods are a hot commodity, and they're not a passing fad. I happen to really like statistics and methods, so I have pursued that as a concentration of mine. -Don't be afraid to take on volunteer work and part-time gigs that will give you skills that will be useful both inside academia and out, as long as it's not against your contract. Your adviser may be against it, but he doesn't have to know as long as it doesn't interfere with your work. -If you want to work outside of academia - if you are even *considering* the possibility - please please definitely do the above. Even if you aren't considering it, consider the possibility that you won't get a tenure-track job out the box and that you may need to support yourself doing something else for a while. You will have to prove to employers that you have developed usable, useful skills and this is one of the easiest ways to do it. But don't overdo it - get the degree done. -For more academic related ones - always look for opportunities to present and publish. Presentations look good on your CV. Publications look better. When you write seminar papers, wonder if you can publish them with some revision. Write your seminar papers on what you maybe think you may want to do your dissertation on. Even if you look at them three years later and think "these suck," you can at least glean some useful references and pieces from them. Discuss publication with your adviser early and often, and if you have the time and desire, seek out publication options with other professors and researchers. But if you commit to a project, COMMIT. You don't want to leave a bad impression. -If you can afford it, occasionally go to conferences even if you aren't presenting. You can network, and you can hear some interesting talks, and you may think about new directions for your own research. You can also meet people who may tell you about jobs, money, opportunities, etc. -Always try to get someone else to pay for conference travel before you come out of pocket. Including your adviser. Do not be shy about asking if he or she can pay. If he can't, he'll just say no. Usually the department has a travel fund for students, but often it's only if you are presenting. -If you are interested in academia, you should get some teaching experience. There are two traditional ways to do this: TAing a course, and teaching as a sole instructor. If you can help it, I wouldn't recommend doing a sole instructor position until you are finished with coursework. Teaching takes a LOT of time to do right. You should definitely TA at least one course, and probably a few different ones. But don't overdo it, if you can help it, because again, it takes a LOT of time. More than you expect at the outset. If you are in the humanities, I think sole instructor positions are very important for nabbing jobs so when you are in the exam/ABD phase, you may want to try at least one. If your own university has none, look at adjuncting for nearby colleges, including community colleges. (I would wager that the majority of natural science/physical science students, and most social science students, have never sole taught a class before they get an assistant professor job. At least, it's not that common n my field, which straddles the social and natural sciences.) -Always look for money. Money is awesome. If you can fund yourself you can do what you want, within reason. Your university will be thrilled, your adviser will be happy, and you can put it on your CV. It's win-win-win! Don't put yourself out of the running before anyone else has a chance to. Apply even if you think you won't get it or the odds are against you (they always are), as long as you are eligible. Apply often. Apply even if it's only $500. (That's conference travel!) Money begets money. The more awards you get, the more awards you will get. They will get bigger over time. If you are in the sciences and social sciences, you should get practice writing at least one grant. You don't have to write the whole thing, but at least get in on the process so that you can see how it's done. Grant-writing is very valuable both in and outside of graduate school. -Revise your CV every so often. Then look and decide what you want to add to it. Then go get that thing, so you can add it. -The career office at big universities is often not just for undergrads. I was surprised to learn that my career center offers help on CV organization and the academic job search, as well as alternative/non-academic career searches for doctoral students. In fact, there are two people whose sole purpose it is to help PhD students find nonacademic careers, and they both have PhDs. This will vary by university - some universities will have very little for grad students. Find out before you write the office off. -It's never too early to go to seminars/workshops like "the academic job search inside and out", "creating the perfect CV," "getting the job," etc. NEVER. Often the leader will share tips that are more aimed towards early graduate students, or tidbits that are kind of too late for more advanced students to take care of. This will also help you keep a pulse on what's hot in your field. It'll help you know what lines you need to add to your CV. And they're interesting. Other: -Decide ahead of time what you are NOT willing to sacrifice on the altar of academia. Then stick to it. I'm serious. If you decide that you do NOT want to sacrifice your relationship, don't. If it's your geographical mobility, don't. I mean, be realistic, and realize that there will always be trade-offs. But you have to think about what's important to you for your quality of life, and realize that there is always more to you than graduate school. -If you don't want to be a professor, do not feel guilty about this. At all. Zero. However, you will have to do things differently than most doctoral students. Your adviser will probably never have worked outside of the academy (although this may vary depending on the field) so he may or may not be able to help you. But you have a special mission to seek out the kinds of experiences that will help you find a non-academic job. Test the waters with your adviser before you tell him this. My adviser was quite amenable to it, but that's because I told him that my goal was to still do research and policy work in my field just not at a university, AND because it's quite common in my field for doctoral students to do non-academic work. If you're in a field where it's not common (or where your professors refuse to believe it's common, or it's not supposed to be common)…well, you may be a little more on your own. -Every so often, you will need to reflect on the reasons you came to graduate school. Sometimes, just sit and think quietly. Why are you doing this to yourself? Do you love your field? Do you need this degree to do what you want to do? Usually the answer is yes and yes, and usually you'll keep on trucking. But sometimes when the chips are down you will need to reevaluate why you put yourself through this in the first place. -To my great dismay, depression is quite common in doctoral students. Graduate work can be isolating and stressful. Luckily your health insurance usually includes counseling sessions. TAKE THEM if you need them. Do not be ashamed. You may be surprised with who else is getting them. (I found out that everyone in my cohort, including me, was getting mental health counseling at a certain point.) Exercise can help, as can taking that mental health day once a week and just chilling. Don't be surprised if you get the blues… -…but be self-aware and able to recognize when the depression is clouding your ability to function. Doctoral programs have a 50% attrition rate, and this is rarely because that 50% is less intelligent than, less motivated than, less driven than, or less ambitious than the other 50% that stays. Often they realize that they are ridiculously unhappy in the field, or that they don't need the degree anymore, or that they'd rather focus on other things in life, or their interests have changed. All of this is okay! -You will, at some point, be like "eff this, I'm leaving." I think almost every doctoral student has thought about dropping out and just kicking this all to the curb. You need to listen to yourself, and find out whether it is idle thought (nothing to worry about, very normal) or whether you are truly unhappy to the point that you need to leave. Counseling can help you figure this out. -Don't be afraid to take a semester or a year off if you need to. That's what leaves of absence are for. Lastly, and positively… …graduate school is great! Seriously, when else will you ever have the time to study what you want for hours on end, talk to just as interested others about it, and live in an intellectual community of scholars and intellectuals? And occasionally wake up at 11 am and go to the bank at 2 pm? Sometimes you will want to pull out all of your hair but most of the time, you will feel fulfilled and wonderfully encouraged and edified. So enjoy this time!
  22. 6 points
    For those waitlisted at U of T, a lot of my close friends in the program got off the wait list my year. I would say proceed with cautious optimism, it might not happen but it might, and if it does let it be a pleasant surprise. I'm so sorry for those of you that feel discouraged, as I mentioned in a post a while ago I firmly believe that if it's your dream--it'll happen, one way or the other--be proud of your accomplishments in the mean time. The program is *stupid* competitive, not getting in is not a reflection of your abilities or your potential in any way shape or form. I'm positive you will ALL be tremendous Social Workers one day, even if it takes a bit more time. Hang in there and don't forget to be compassionate towards yourself <3 and if you feel you need any extra emotional support, this forum is here for you.
  23. 6 points
    smithsonian25

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    In this waiting game I am either like "I am one with the force, the force is with me" or "what do you mean I only refreshed 1 minute ago? It feels like it's been at least 15 minutes"... There is literally no in between.
  24. 6 points
    daniellekl

    NEW Canadian universities M.S.W thread (2017)

    Also, just so you all know, I got my mail today and my ACORN doesn't say "invited". So, don't use ACORN as a tool to check whether you were accepted. Just wait for the snail mail
  25. 6 points
    mckenna81

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Yes. You gotta eat. Only do this with a job you can afford to burn bridges with, of course. But you need a job and no one is going to hire you if you tell them you're leaving in January. Is it ethical to lie (or withhold the truth)? Technically no, but in my experience loyalty is one of those things that is expected of employees and never really reciprocated by employers. Do what you need to do for you.
  26. 6 points
    JAvS

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Hi everyone! So I've been lurking on this forum for a little while, thought I'd come out of the shadows. I got the dreaded (A) for an ETA in Bulgaria, but I'm not giving up yet! I'm so sorry to everyone that didn't make it this round and CONGRATULATIONS to those accepted!! Thank you all for being so kind and supportive to each other. It's so refreshing to see so much positivity on the Internet, especially in a competitive setting like this. This forum got me through all this, for real. You all are rock stars and I wish you the best of luck! @catsbloom @Tera @Jess2323 @lightaheadi and whoever I'm missing, you are all worthy and excellent in your own ways and I'm proud of us!
  27. 6 points
    Eigen

    NEW Canadian universities M.S.W thread (2017)

    Just posting some clarification here, and sorry for the slow responses- most of the moderation team is currently traveling, and moderating via cell phone isn't the easiest. We don't screen for veracity of claims. Nor do we penalize people for calling out bad information, or information as suspect. That said, there's a fine line between calling out information as bad, and calling out a user as a troll. Stick to the information, don't target the user. Similarly, there are lines that have been crossed in the past wherein current bad posts cause past non-objectionable posts to be down voted in multitudes. I will also mention that we take people posting from multiple accounts very seriously, and is usually results in banning of one account along with suspension of the other account. That said, it is especially difficult to tell when people are positing on multiple accounts- many people here post from universities, and have the same IP address. Basing suspensions and bans on IP address is a really bad thing, as there are several of you here who share an IP address with MSW2MD- banning that IP address would indirectly ban you. We are honestly doing our best to keep up with this, and we really appreciate how hard all of you are working to ignore and report rather than responding.
  28. 6 points
    Maybe, unclear. But your behavior today isn't helping anything. Friends, no need to create new reports. We are aware of this situation and are taking care of it. Congratulations to those who got accepted and good luck to those still waiting.
  29. 6 points
    ...ANYWAY. Heartfelt congratulations to everyone who heard back from U of T today, it's so exciting and you are all so deserving. For those whose anxiety is through the roof right now and may have had an emotional night after finding out others have received acceptances, please don't lose hope and please remember to be kind to yourself. This is a long, drawn out, crappy process for everyone and hopefully you get in during the next rounds, but regardless, this experience DOES NOT define you or your worth. Remember to keep swimming <3 you'll get where you need to be.
  30. 6 points
    Sigwarz

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    UK FINALIST. Best birthday present ever. congrats to all finalists for Germany and U.K. For those who didn't get it, I'm so sorry. and for those who haven't heard yet, good luck!!!
  31. 6 points
    Just admitted to UCI from the waitlist. It certainly complicates the decision making-- I was pretty certain I would end up at UMich, but now the decision just got much harder!
  32. 6 points
    eadwacer

    2017 Final Decisions

    I just emailed the MA program at UBC with my official acceptance! I'm so excited! Honestly, my final decision happened yesterday when I read a course description on their website yesterday and it was so exciting and perfect for my research interests that I audibly gasped.
  33. 5 points
    screel45

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Hi everyone! I've been lurking for a while and have been commiserating wholeheartedly with everyone about waiting for results. Bahrain usually doesn't notify until late April so I wasn't expecting anything until then, but I just got the email that I am a finalist for the ETA!!!! If anyone else is going to be in the Gulf area for research or ETA let me know!!! On a side note, I also won a CLS award to study Arabic in Oman this summer, but the PDO for Fulbright is right in the middle of the CLS period. Has anyone had experience with or known someone who has been able to miss the Fulbright PDO for this reason? The dates for the actual CLS and Fulbright periods don't conflict, just the orientation. You guys are amazing and have kept me sane the past few months. Thank you for being here!!!
  34. 5 points
    kingfisherscatchfire

    2017 Acceptances

    As a current Oxford DPhil, I would caution against the flippancy of the above advice. Both U of Chicago and Oxford will indeed open tonnes of opportunities for you as a scholar, but these opportunities will likely be very different. Would you prefer an academic career in the US? Choose U of Chicago. Do you plan on staying in Britain? Oxford. 'Following your dream' is probably not the most sensible thing to do here, as you are choosing between two very different programmes. Would you benefit from course breadth and structure, or are you comfortable in your knowledge and eager to begin your dissertation? I would recommend looking very closely at what types of academic experiences these programmes offer, as, at the end of the day, that is what matters. Final thought: choosing U of Chicago is absolutely not demonstrating a 'lack of guts'! One of the MSt students here is heading to U of Chicago next year for her PhD--her supervisor recommended this move because it is 'better than Harvard'. All in all, you've got great options Feel free to PM me if you have any questions
  35. 5 points
    thepictureisstill

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I must admit that the unexpected extended wait time is making my expectations plummet, which means less disappointment when notifications do come out.
  36. 5 points
    matchamatcha

    Acceptance Thread

    In at Indiana HPS after my inteview this morning. Throws a huge (but happy) wrench in my decision plan.
  37. 5 points
    Number 1 best practice: Find time for yourself. Seriously, it cannot be overstated. All of us could theoretically read and write 24 hours a day, 7 days a week if our bodies allowed it. First year PhD students often feel like they're not doing enough, not reading enough, not attending enough talks and lectures, not in enough reading groups, not writing enough, not presenting enough, not publishing enough (though this last one is a fair concern for all PhD students if we're talking peer reviewed journal articles.) I'm not saying don't try to publish one book review a term. If you feel that's manageable for you given all other requirements of your program, then go for it.** Most people have no problem figuring out how to fill their days with academic work. It's not hard for us because it's the only thing that we can see ourselves doing professionally, so we're just drawn to doing it. Yes, it's good to practice languages regularly, to read regularly, etc. All of that is definitely important--but I think those are the things that come naturally to us (more or less.) What doesn't come naturally to some of us is finding time to just go see a movie. Get a beer with colleagues and don't talk about your work. Explore your new city. Take a day and just binge watch something on Netflix. It's easy for us to feel guilty about doing these things, but we shouldn't. Honestly, they're healthy, and they'll help you be more productive when you need to be because you're able to take regular breaks without feeling crushed by stress and guilt. Cultivating that early on is really helpful once you no longer have the structure of a course schedule to help manage your time. **Quick note on book reviews: They're great practice for the process of publishing something because they're easy to do relative to publishing a peer reviewed article in a major journal. They give you a small window into the editing process, etc. However, they're not going to help you get a job. Even if you had more than two or three reviews published, you wouldn't load up your CV with book reviews. All that to say, once you get a couple under your belt, you might consider taking a break from them to focus on exams, prospectus, etc.
  38. 5 points
  39. 5 points
    Budgetmitten

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Hello! I discovered this forum only a fortnight ago, have been lurking ever since, and wanted to pop-in to thank you all for sharing your experiences on your Fulbright journey. The kindness and consideration people have shown to each other, and to future Fulbright applicants, despite the potential for competitiveness is a great testament to the solidarity of this particular community. I am very grateful for people's generosity and openness, and for the work everyone has put into updating the Google Doc and keeping records. Thank you all. As for myself, I am on the other side of the Fulbright equation, having applied to carry out research in the US next year. Last year's candidates found out before St Patrick's Day, so I am a little bit beside myself with nerves at this point. Best of luck to all those who will be scattering to the four winds on Fulbright awards! And fingers crossed for those awaiting news still.
  40. 5 points
    piers_plowman

    Waitlist Movement

    At this point I've declined offers from UC Davis, UC Irvine, Rice, UNC Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins, and Michigan - hope someone here benefits!
  41. 5 points
    AnthropologyNRT

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Well keep in touch with me and I can maybe be a resource next cycle! Good luck friend!
  42. 5 points
    Old Bill

    Villanova vs. U. Ill: Urbana-Champaign

    I completely agree with this, and having gone through the B.A. - M.A. - Ph.D. progression, rather than the B.A. - Ph.D. one that I had initially planned on, I'm infinitely grateful to have received my M.A. first. People can (and routinely do) still thrive when going from B.A. to Ph.D., of course -- it's really a YMMV situation -- but there's huge value to getting acclimated to graduate study via an M.A. first, and it still gives you an advanced degree if you realize that you don't want to go down the Ph.D. road after all. I don't agree with the following, however: I say this with no trace of intended offense whatsoever (obviously!), but the notion that you need to start a Ph.D. with a firm idea of what you'll write your dissertation on is one of the biggest myths out there about this process. I'm nearly done with my M.A. and have zero idea of what I'll be writing my dissertation on during my Ph.D. Sure, I've thought of some vague possibilities, based on what I've already been focusing on, but dissertation topics are often arrived at by regular consultation with professors and mentors, combined with the evolution of your own interests, combined with what's happening in the world of academia in your subfield today. Honestly, some people don't know what they're going to write their dissertation on until after they complete their comps. In other words, you are allowed to explore for quite awhile until you finally have to hone in and specialize. As to the OP, UIUC seems like a no-brainer to me, based on what you've described. Remember, however, that rankings don't apply to Master's programs, so that's a false equivalence in the for/against list. Still, I think that at the Master's level, you want to go to a program that is institutionally strong in your area of choice. Remember that when it comes to POIs, while they're still very important, you'll only be working with them for two years, as opposed to the five or six at the doctoral level...and you'll (theoretically) have a better idea of your specific focus once you're done with your M.A. In other words, if you know that gender studies (broadly defined) are your main interest, then going to a program that is strong in that realm will help you to whittle down to more specifics, which will then introduce you to some of the key POIs in those specifics, which will then allow you to focus your Ph.D. program research around those POIs...and those POIs may be different from the POIs you are highlighting now. Both are great programs, of course, and it's a luxury to have a choice! But from what you've stated, I think UIUC is your best bet.
  43. 5 points
    CaffeineCardigan

    2017 Final Decisions

    I've been off this forum for weeks because for a while there it looked like I was going to have to wait and apply again next year, but I ended up accepting an offer from Northern Arizona I'm pretty happy with. I received an assistantship with a decent stipend, 100% tuition remission, and health insurance completely covered by the university. After thinking I wouldn't be able to go anywhere and rejecting offers from my top two schools because of finances, I'm so happy to have accepted an offer! Now I'm looking towards getting back into my studies and getting ready to do this all again with a much stronger application for PhD programs in two years!
  44. 5 points
    Lab6214

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    I go to Truman, a small state school in Missouri, and of our 9 ETA semifinalists, 8 of us are finalists and the 9th is an alternate! We are all overjoyed and can't believe our good luck! FOUR to Spain (including me), one to South Africa, one to Korea, one to Georgia, one to Nepal, and an alternate for Colombia. I'm a very proud Bulldog today!
  45. 5 points
    imogenshakes

    Waitlist Movement

    I accepted my offer at Davis yesterday and sent out emails declining all of my other fully funded offers, so there should be some movement (hopefully) at Riverside, Madison, UGA, Iowa, and Santa Barbara. I also pulled my name off the waitlist at GWU (I was "very high" on it, apparently, whatever that means), so for what that's worth. I hope someone here gets one of these spots!
  46. 5 points
    I went to visiting days with my hair dyed a fluorescent blue. I also wasn't sure how to act - I was a first gen college student from rural Illinois visiting an Ivy League, the stress of figuring out how to present myself actually made me nauseous. Looking back, I'm laughing at how much I overthought it. Just wear something comfy but modest. That's literally the only advice you need. Oh, and chill.
  47. 5 points
    AHHHhh. just logged onto ACORN (I am not a former UOFT student), and it says I'm invited to the 2017/2018 2 year MSW program!!
  48. 5 points
    I'm in at WSU! Totally freaking out/just cried when I saw the e-mail. I can already feel the stress leaving my body. I can't believe it! Thank you all so much for all the support through this. It was wonderful to find this community of people to talk to/bounce ideas off of while playing the waiting game. Best of luck to everyone- in or still waiting or getting ready to apply again next year- it'll all work out the way it is suposed to.
  49. 5 points
    lightaheadi

    Fulbright 2017-2018

    Good morning everyone! Another day of insanity! My attitude toward notifications (at this point in time) has basically turned to this:
  50. 4 points
    DanielleSLP

    2017 Canadian Application Thread!

    The countdown is on - I'm SO glad we'll have a response by the end of this week! Something that I found helpful was creating a chart so that when I get the news, I immediately have action steps in place to deal with: the good news, the ok news and even the bad news. Thought I would share it so you can create one of your own to help you deal with the difficult waiting period! And don't forget to put "celebrate" under what to do immediately if you're accepted! 😉