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turktheman

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About turktheman

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  • Location
    New England
  • Application Season
    2017 Fall
  • Program
    PhD

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  1. FSU doesn't have the name recognition that many other schools that have had programs for decades now. I can pass along what I've heard from professors at Baylor and FSU when I was working through the application decision through PM if you'd like. I would just encourage you to reach out to a few professors to inquire about recent job placement from each school. Personally, I think for what you want to do, FSU has a solid program. You mention Levenson and your own interests in Josephus. I've only heard very positive things about Levenson from faculty at my school. He's a well-known scholar among those who know NT/Early Church and late Second Temple Judaism. Matt Goff is tremendous. If you haven't done Aramaic yet, he would likely be your instructor. His DSS work on sapiential literature and the Book of the Giants is great stuff, and he like Levenson is well-known. I don't know much about Kelly, but her faculty profile indicates she's working on disability studies in the early church/NT. This is an ever increasing field of interests and is a hot-topic now. In classics, you have Marincola's work on Greek historiography and Slaveva-Griffin's on neo-platonism. So, you have solid professors at FSU that can lead some truly interesting dissertation topics. A dissertation on disability in Josephus and Philo would be great pulling together of faculty strengths, but I don't think a dissertation on Paul's pneumatology would fit well. If you are at all interested in something like the latter or similar, FSU would not be a good fit. I think Baylor would be better able to work with people wanting to research and write on more-or-less NT Theology--broadly speaking. At the same time, Longenecker has worked on more historical matters than his colleagues. In his book on the Jerusalem collection, he does offer a bit of a correction to Friesen's economic scales (I haven't seen anyone adopt Longnecker's corrections), and he has the new book on crosses at Pompeii (I haven't read it yet). Gaventa has been around forever, and she is the most well-known of Baylor's faculty, but she doesn't do much in backgrounds. Parsons does interact quite a bit with physiognomy and the progymnasmatia handbooks, esp. Theon. I would consider this background for exploring rhetorical analysis of NT/early church. Parsons has also applied his research on progymnasmata to discuss disabilities in Luke-Acts--or at least the rhetoric of disability. Novakovic's DSS work is solid, and she has published some key translations from what I remember. Iverson overlaps somewhat with Parson's concern with narratology, but I'm honestly not familiar with his work beyond the edited volume he did with Skinner who is at Loyola Chicago. I do know Baylor offers a seminar on backgrounds as part of its class rotation, but I couldn't comment more on that (I'm sure other are able to do so). All that considered, I would likely pick Baylor over FSU for one reason: better financial aid package. If finances were equal, it would be a very tough decision. For backgrounds, I think FSU edges Baylor out both in Second Temple and early Church. If you wanted to do narrative approaches to NT, Baylor it is. You won't get any of that from FSU. What you will get at FSU, however, is solid opportunities to incorporate Greco-Roman philosophical schools, religions, literature, etc. and Second Temple literature and history into your research of the NT and early church.
  2. How do you feel about your chances coming off the waitlist at Brown or PTS?
  3. How many programs are you waitlisted at? I can say that I had every intention of making a decision in early March, but that was not possible for me because I had a few offers to weigh against one another, which took far more time than I had expected. Now that we are more or less in April, people are finalizing their decisions and notifying programs of their declination of offer. This also applies to those holding out committing to a program in hopes of coming off a waitlist at one of their top picks.
  4. There's a lot of residue from bygone eras on this ranking.
  5. Well, the time is close, then. I'm assuming emails will trickle through the day, but it could come in groups. We'll know soon enough.
  6. What subfield are you?
  7. Does anyone know if Emory sent out rejections yet?
  8. Did you get an interview at Yale or just a rejection?
  9. Has anyone else noticed that the results section is not working? No updates site-wide for a long while (Not sure how long).
  10. From the results page it looks like BU could very well be one of the last to make decisions. I've seen late February to the first couple of weeks of March.
  11. A friend from my first masters applied a couple of weeks ago, but he hasn't heard. He's expecting to hear back in March. I would apply ASAP and send an e-mail to admissions to inquire about the turn around. To add undue information, their summer language agreement with Princeton University for German/French/Latin is a great way to get a leg up in the application pool, and it is cheap. Parsenios's work on the Gospel of John in light of Greek literature (esp. drama) is great. I've heard a lot of great things from people who have done their dissertation under him. I would also add that if you do decide on a ThM, be sure to contact the professors as soon as you are admitted and decide to attend. You can make contact through the summer to help speed along the getting to know you process for recommendation letters. PTS also publishes its course list in advance, so their website (maybe under the catalog) would already tell you what classes you can expect.
  12. I'd certainly look into PTS in that case. Plus its costs aren't as insurmountable as other ThMs.
  13. I would second the suggestion of shopping around for ThM programs. Also STM programs (like Yale's) are more or the less the same as a ThM. Many people will tell you that ThM programs are cash cows for schools (i.e. little to no funding for admitted students). Yale routinely offers 50% tuition remittance for their STM students; however, I think once you calculate living costs Yale's STM is similarly priced to Princeton Seminary's ThM. I know there are a few Duke ThM's who frequent the forum who could speak to the benefits of doing an advanced degree there. I would also recommend contacting a few schools you think you are good fit for. Ask them about their opinions of ThM/STM programs and what places they think best prepare students for doctoral work at their school. Another way to ask this is to simply inquire into the types of places recently admitted students have come from. One school I know this year only took Yale students; in fact, just about three years running they have only taken Yale students. If you wanted to go to that school, going to TEDS or elsewhere would be of little help.
  14. Scratch that. I see Historical Studies is under GDR. Sorry, I don't know.
  15. In their GDR or history department? I have a friend who got into Vanderbilt' s history program specializing in Sephardic history and Judeo-Arabic. I'm pretty sure he's turning it down soon.