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Warelin

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Warelin last won the day on January 12

Warelin had the most liked content!

About Warelin

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    Mocha

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    Philadelphia
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    English Literature

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  1. I think it's important to note that no MA programs are ranked. As a result, you'll find that Villanova, University of Massachusetts - Boston, Wake Forest, Georgetown, Oregon State University and others aren't ranked. Likewise, a program's "prestige" extends only to its PHD program. Some people might have trouble transferring from one institution that grants PHDs to another that grants PHD. This might be because some programs might think that the person wasn't good enough to be accepted into their own PHD program. I think it might also be important to consider the overall climate of a city (temperature, rural vs city, political spectrum, transportation options, costs) and other things of that nature. From my own experience, there are some cities I've lived in for extended periods that I would be unhappy living in and others that I would gladly love to live in again. It might also be worth noting how much time would be granted to you as an MA student. Are there upper-level undergrads taking classes with you? Are you competing with PHD students for funding? How many students does each faculty have under them? No university could guarantee an outcome. I've had friends from the Ivy League get shut out when applying to some schools for an English PHD program. There are schools that prefer straight-from-undergraduate (and I believe Illinois, Indiana and Penn State are the most well known), there are some schools which require an MA, and there are schools that prefer a mixture of students. Some schools separate the applicants into 2 different piles depending on whether they possess an MA or not. As a result, you may find that some schools will be harder to gain an acceptance into while you'll find others will be more "open" to the idea of accepting you. On a different sidenote: The institution that you went to for your Master's is significantly less important than where you get your PHD from. From different conversations I've had with directors, they care more about the classes you've had and why you've decided on the classes you take and why you're interested in them.
  2. I think you bring up several good points here including that it is human tendacy to have some bias. However, according to US News: "The questionnaires asked respondents to rate the academic quality of the programs at other institutions on a five-point scale: outstanding (5), strong (4), good (3), adequate (2) or marginal (1). Individuals who were unfamiliar with a particular school's programs were asked to select "don't know." To me, this sounds like they weren't able to rank their own program. "Scores for each school were determined by computing a trimmed mean – eliminating the two highest and two lowest responses – of the ratings of all respondents who rated that school for the last two surveys; average scores were then sorted in descending order. " In theory, this sounds good. However, only 14 percent of people polled responded. There were 155 programs surveyed and 2 people were asked from each university. That would put the number of people asked at 310. 14 percent of 310 =43.4 people. Once you consider that most programs had 0 people responding to the survey and others had 2, it's likely that the list is comprised of the opinions of 22-35 universities. On a side note: You bring up a very good point. I think the ivies do pay attention to each other's programs and their placement rates. If I were a director, I'd want to know what my competitor was doing, who/why I was losing candidates to them and how I could improve my own program to have less people choose to go somewhere else. I'm not sure if any of those universities could tell you much about the programs elsewhere. I'd imagine it's also true of colleges close to each other (BU,BC, NU, Tufts, Brandeis). However, I don't think that the latter group is necessarily paying attention to the first group. I think this survey has a way of meaning something if the participation was higher and some sort of concrete numbers were thrown into the mix. Do you think that the major jumps in some programs were due to its competitors perceiving it to improving its graduate program or from a better perceived placement record or a higher visibility rate? On a side-side note: When people refer to the ivies in this context, is Brown and Cornell included in that mix? Or are they excluded in favor of Stanford/Berkeley/Chicago to refer to a "top 5" school? It's always confused me because I know a few people use it to exclusively refer to HYP.
  3. From my understanding of friends who did an MFA followed by a PHD in CW: The two are extremely different. I think in terms of rigour, the University of Southern California does a good job of combining Creative Writing & Literature together. In most PHD programs, you'd be doing everything the lit majors would do + a creative dissertation. USC's dissertation project requires both a creative and critical manuscript. Houston is also well regarded in those terms of offering a "woven" experience.
  4. Not all waitlisters get admitted or accept an unfunded offer. It's generally common for schools to either accept their target number, waitlist twice as many and reject everyone else. Other schools accept twice their target, waitlist a smaller amount and go from there. I think Rice University only accepts as many as they can take in and then move on to their waitlist. Bigger universities like The Ohio State University accept 30 students for a target of 12-15 students. I think as a result, they rarely move on to their waitlist.
  5. Just a quick note here: USNews doesn't rank MA programs. (You'll also find Georgetown, Wake Forest and University of Massachusetts Boston are unranked. USNews ranking doesn't extend to a ranked program's MA program. That being said, Illinois is a good school. However, it's a program that leans towards accepting straight from undergrad as opposed to a more mixed cohort as other universities are inclined to do.
  6. Whenever you post here, I think you've been accepted to the strode program and want to offer you congratulations =P
  7. http://villanovaenglish.blogspot.com/2017/03/a-message-from-chair-new-fall-courses.html ;)
  8. Funding will most likely come tomorrow. Villanova just got finished hiring a professor from UPenn and just released their fall courses yesterday.
  9. Illinois was ranked #22 with CUNY under the old rankings. However, a drop from 22 to 26 isn't that different. It seems like there were also a lot less "ties" than there were.
  10. I wholeheartedly agree with this. But what would you propose doing with students that don't go on to the national job market due to family location or those who choose an alternative career?
  11. OSU has accepted students with MAs from Utah State University, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, College of Charleston, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University & others. As far as I'm aware, none of these institutions have an English PHD program. They may or may grant PHDs in other areas like Villanova does. As a sidenote: Transferring credit is limited at most colleges. Most of them will not offer you a full year release even with an MA. Most colleges will only offer you 2-4 classes worth of credits; others may elect to count it towards certain requirements but still require the same amount of classes to be taken. Others prefer to start you fresh regardless of whether you possess an MA or a BA.
  12. I do believe CUNY is under ranked. However, Harvard has placed grads in TT positions over the past 2 years: http://english.fas.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Placement-Results.pdf
  13. To their credit, at least they took down Bryn Mawr's nonexistent English PHD =P
  14. https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-humanities-schools/medieval-renaissance-literature-rankings I'm also confused here. Wasn't Notre Dame previously ranked in this section?
  15. "Rankings of doctoral programs in the social sciences and humanities are based solely on the results of peer assessment surveys sent to academics in each discipline. Ipsos Public Affairs conducted the surveys in fall 2016. Each school offering a doctoral program was sent two surveys per discipline. Questionnaires were sent to department heads and directors of graduate studies – or, alternatively, a senior faculty member who teaches graduate students – at schools that had granted a total of five or more doctorates in each discipline during the five-year period from 2011 through 2015, as indicated by the National Center for Education Statistics' Completions survey. The questionnaires asked respondents to rate the academic quality of the programs at other institutions on a five-point scale: outstanding (5), strong (4), good (3), adequate (2) or marginal (1). Individuals who were unfamiliar with a particular school's programs were asked to select "don't know." Scores for each school were determined by computing a trimmed mean – eliminating the two highest and two lowest responses – of the ratings of all respondents who rated that school for the last two surveys; average scores were then sorted in descending order." These surveys are still too opinionated until they consider placements, resources offered, publication rates and other things.