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cokohlik

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  • Content count

    598
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cokohlik last won the day on March 22 2012

cokohlik had the most liked content!

1 Follower

About cokohlik

  • Rank
    Macchiato
  • Birthday December 6

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.caravaggista.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Los Angeles
  • Interests
    Art history, Caravaggio
  • Program
    Art History
  1. In 64 days, I'll be driving cross-country with my parents to Delaware. My dad offered generously to drive our truck, which will also be towing our car. I last did a move like this when I was a kid, so I was too naive to know that I should worry about things like accidents, the car breaking down, thieves breaking into the storage portion, running out of gas, how to park so you don't need to reverse, etc. Now, these are all things I'm terrified of, even though I definitely trust my dad. He's a great driver. It's just a little daunting. We've slowly been packing up our apartment and getting rid of things. We're selling our multi-functional pool/dining/poker table and we bought a queen sofabed so that we can have our parents stay over with us when they come to visit. I've been reviewing my Italian and reading as much as I can (which is not much -- probably only a couple hours a day since I can't read at my work ). I have so much that I want to read before school starts but I don't know if I'll have time. My husband's work has been incredibly kind to us. That's an understatement. He's allowed to keep his job and work remotely, as an independent contractor. The details are a little complicated, but basically it boils down to the fact that we'll have a steady stream of income that can support us. Taxes for independent contractors kind of suck, as we found out (if I understand it right, it's like 30% when you include the federal tax and the self employment tax), but as long as I can maintain my grades enough to keep getting funding/tuition/my stipend, then we'll be just fine. Our apartment is a little pricey but I honestly can't wait to live there and don't mind the rent because the environment is so perfect. Both of our jobs have become crazy busy, of course... so that adds to the hectic feeling of our move. I've thought of a few titles and topics for my thesis and have been tempted to email my adviser to tell him that I already know what I want to write on. Either of these things are things I've been thinking about for years and years, so I know I'll end up writing about one of them. I'm so excited about it. I also have classes picked out and we're planning to create a little work space for me in our new place. My husband gets an office, too, so he's so excited about that and I couldn't be more happy that he's excited about this new adventure. Anyway! I hope you are all doing well I Haven't had any time at all to come on the forum so I have no idea what's happening with any of you any more It's awful. I really hope I'll have time to get back on the boards soon because I really enjoy the community here!
  2. In 64 days, I'll be driving cross-country with my parents to Delaware. My dad offered generously to drive our truck, which will also be towing our car. I last did a move like this when I was a kid, so I was too naive to know that I should worry about things like accidents, the car breaking down, thieves breaking into the storage portion, running out of gas, how to park so you don't need to reverse, etc. Now, these are all things I'm terrified of, even though I definitely trust my dad. He's a great driver. It's just a little daunting. We've slowly been packing up our apartment and getting rid of things. We're selling our multi-functional pool/dining/poker table and we bought a queen sofabed so that we can have our parents stay over with us when they come to visit. I've been reviewing my Italian and reading as much as I can (which is not much -- probably only a couple hours a day since I can't read at my work ). I have so much that I want to read before school starts but I don't know if I'll have time. My husband's work has been incredibly kind to us. That's an understatement. He's allowed to keep his job and work remotely, as an independent contractor. The details are a little complicated, but basically it boils down to the fact that we'll have a steady stream of income that can support us. Taxes for independent contractors kind of suck, as we found out (if I understand it right, it's like 30% when you include the federal tax and the self employment tax), but as long as I can maintain my grades enough to keep getting funding/tuition/my stipend, then we'll be just fine. Our apartment is a little pricey but I honestly can't wait to live there and don't mind the rent because the environment is so perfect. Both of our jobs have become crazy busy, of course... so that adds to the hectic feeling of our move. I've thought of a few titles and topics for my thesis and have been tempted to email my adviser to tell him that I already know what I want to write on. Either of these things are things I've been thinking about for years and years, so I know I'll end up writing about one of them. I'm so excited about it. I also have classes picked out and we're planning to create a little work space for me in our new place. My husband gets an office, too, so he's so excited about that and I couldn't be more happy that he's excited about this new adventure. Anyway! I hope you are all doing well I Haven't had any time at all to come on the forum so I have no idea what's happening with any of you any more It's awful. I really hope I'll have time to get back on the boards soon because I really enjoy the community here!
  3. We have an apartment and my husband has full-time work -- his dream job!! So proud of him and so blessed that we have a place to live and steady income for our new adventure!

    1. newms

      newms

      Congrats!

    2. mandarin.orange

      mandarin.orange

      HUGE congrats! Glad the hubby is excited about his career direction, too!

    3. cokohlik

      cokohlik

      Thank you! It's all so unbelievable!! :D

  4. Thank you so much for sharing your story and for the advice. I hope that my cohort is nice and that I'll be comfortable enough with them to actually talk to/bond with them. I haven't introduced myself to any of them yet but I'm told I'll get to meet them during TA orientation! If they are anything like the other students I've met in my department then I imagine we'll get along famously! I love this! I always feel like I need to rise up to their level of thinking but who knows how to do that when I'm just starting graduate study, if you know what I mean. I've been reading as much of my POI's work as I can so I can get an idea of how he thinks to see how my way of thinking might cooperate (not really sure of the right word) with his. So anxious for school to start so I can get first-hand experience... and start learning, of course.
  5. We have an apartment now! :)

  6. Thank you so much! I don't know why the endnote thing freaked me out so much. I've started to take note of scholars' endnotes and it seems fairly simple but for some reason the thought of actually writing these is intimidating. I think I'll get the hang of it once I write my first graduate paper and get feedback on it. Maybe I'll even be required to turn in rough drafts -- which would be so helpful but I doubt profs have time to read graduate level rough drafts. I've started to read ahead of time for some of my coursework and the things I'd like to research. Luckily, what I've read so far is challenging but not overbearingly difficult. I'm not sure who to thank for that but I fully expect the readings to become difficult once school starts and I get the real reading list (I'm going off my own intuition and past semesters' syllabi right now, which is a frustrating method because many of the readings are online through a proxy that I can't access and of course the readings only exist online within this one website!) I think the hardest part for me will be vocalizing my thoughts during discussion. I tend to clam up because I'm either so excited by an idea that I mentally trip over myself, or I'm intimidated by the intelligence of my fellow classmates so I end up stuttering and speaking non-coherently (or so I think).
  7. Thank you oswic! I've been picking my way through Robert L. Peters Getting What You Came For, which is helpful, but I can never be too prepared so I'll be checking out your recommendation
  8. Sigaba suggested I read this thread since I'm nervous about my first semester. I've heard that grad courses are easy from so many people, and I'm sure that the work itself (papers, readings, presentations) can be decidedly easy, however, I'm having trouble predicting how I'll do in graduate level discussions. How does one really particpate on a graduate level? I enjoyed what theregalrenegade said about constantly trying to think on a more advanced level. I'm trying to do that early, by pushing myself to read certain texts and read in academic Italian and French, but I suppose i won't know how I'm doing with said thinking level until classes actually begin. I'm slightly excited, because I love a good challenge. Like Red Bull, I came from a fast paced (undergrad) Honors program. I'm not sure if a fast paced undergrad Honors program is comparable to a graduate program, but I hope it is on some level (maybe with regards to weekly amounts of reading or paper lengths). I feel like my undergrad department prepared me well for graduate study on a whole, but I'm getting caught up in being anxious about little details like essay formats and some bigger issues, like becoming more advanced in my level of analysis. Anyway, I know this reply isn't quite relevant to the OP since because I haven't actually begun coursework, they can't necessarily be harder than expected I did find this thread to be inspiring and calming, so thank you!! It's comforting knowing that there are so many people in the same boat.
  9. Thank you! I'm lucky to have a husband who supports me in this crazy endeavor and who reads my papers and such to make sure they actually make sense.... it's remarkable, really. I love it! Have you thought about applying to Winterhur via UDel? I've heard so much about it and it sounds like an amazing program for your interests!
  10. I did! I said meep meep out loud while I was writing it, and countless times on campus... I can't help it. Thank you so much!!
  11. I saw my first ever graduate seminar syllabus today. My first thought was "holy crap, that is a lot of reading," followed by "thankfully, reading is easy," followed by an unnerving feeling when I reached the end of the syllabus that discussed requirements for the final paper. I have no problem reading or writing papers or coming up with ideas, but it seems like I'll have a heck of a time figuring out proper formatting and things like that. I'm not sure what style my department prefers (my guess is Chicago). I'm also worried about endnotes (which were specifically mentioned in the paper requirements and I'm told this isn't uncommon for the dept.). This might sound stupid, but What on earth is an endnote? I mean, I know what endnotes are, technically -- at the end of papers, discussing little details that would be good for your readers to know, sources, and things of that nature, but I've never actually written an endnote myself so I have no idea how they're generally structured or why I personally would need them. I try not to put superfluous information in my papers and although reading endnotes has been useful when reading others' scholarly works, I never actually wrote them for my undergrad papers. I did use footnotes that basically just had bibliographic citation information, but my guess is that this isn't the same thing as a "real" endnote. I've literally spent the last hour on Google trying to discern how endnotes differ from footnotes (is it just that one is in the footer and one is at the end of text?), which makes me feel really, reallystupid. I'm not worried about the amount of reading or even the fact that final papers are usually research papers. All of this is second nature. I don't know why, though, I am so worried about formatting. Perhaps it's because my undergrad art history department didn't really care what formatting you used as long as you were consistent. Perhaps it's because once, I was 1 point away from a perfect score on a health sciences paper just because my margins weren't exactly 1.25" despite how much I tried to fix them and restructure my footnotes (thanks, Word). Or maybe it's because I'm worried that I'll fail (i.e., "get anything less than an A[-]") on my papers and lose all my funding by the second semester because I can't format my writing properly. Sigh. I'm also concerned about what exactly a graduate level seminar sounds like, with regards to student-to-student discussion. I've always thought that I could just be myself in discussions and not have to strive to sound/act/speak certain ways. I assume that this is the same for graduate study, but I also assume that I'll have one professor and ten students judging the merit of what I'm saying (to decide about future funding. Again. Even though fellow students have nothing to do with funding, I don't think.) This sounds silly as a write it, and I know it is. The department and I will get along famously, I'm sure. But I just have to let out all these unhealthy thoughts in a safe place.... I suppose I won't really know any of this until I actually get to the first day of classes. Thanks for listening to my stream-of-consciousness, anxiety-wracked post about endnotes (sorry).
  12. Yay! Mandarin Orange and I like the same book!! :) (Peters')