Welcome to the GradCafe

Hello!  Welcome to The GradCafe Forums.You're welcome to look around the forums and view posts.  However, like most online communities you must register before you can create your own posts.  This is a simple, free process that requires minimal information. Benefits of membership:

  • Participate in discussions
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Search forums
  • Removes some advertisements (including this one!)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'admissions'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
    • Comments, Questions, Etc.
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Blogs

  • An Optimist's PhD Blog
  • coyabean's Blog
  • Saved for a Rainy Day
  • To infinity and beyond
  • captiv8ed's Blog
  • Pea-Jay's Educational Journey
  • Procrastinating
  • alexis' Blog
  • grassroots and bamboo shoots.
  • Ridgey's blog
  • ScreamingHairyArmadillo's Blog
  • amyeray's Blog
  • Blemo Girl's Guide to Grad School
  • Psychdork's Blog
  • missesENG's Blog
  • bgk's Blog
  • Tall Chai Latte's blog
  • PhD is for Chumps
  • bloggin'
  • NY or KY
  • Deadlines Blog Ferment
  • Going All In
  • In Itinere ad Eruditus
  • Adventures in Grad School-ing
  • inafuturelife
  • The Alchemist's Path
  • The Rocking Blog
  • And Here We Go!
  • Presbygeek's Blog
  • zennin' it
  • Magical Mystery Tour
  • A Beggar's Blog
  • A Senseless Game
  • Jumping into the Fray
  • Asian Studies Masters
  • Around the Block Again
  • A complicated affair
  • Click My Heels Three Times and Get In
  • dimanche0829's Blog
  • Computer Science Crossed Fingers
  • To the Lighthouse
  • Blog of Abnormally Aberrant
  • MissMoneyJenny's Blog
  • Two Masters, an Archive and Tea
  • 20/20 Hindsight
  • Right Now I'm A-Roaming
  • A Future Historian's Journey to PhD
  • St Andrews Lynx's Blog
  • Amerz's Blog
  • Musings of a Biotech Babe
  • TheFez's Blog
  • PhD, Please!
  • Blooming Ecologist
  • Brittle Ductile Transitions
  • Pleiotropic Notions
  • EdTech Enthusiast
  • The Many Flavors of Rhetoric
  • Expanding Horizons
  • Yes, and...
  • Flailing Upward
  • Traumatized, Exhausted, and Still Going

Found 195 results

  1. Hi! I know its early. But considering the success of Fall 2017 forum, I thought we should start Fall 2018 discussion thread early! Good luck preparing for your applications!
  2. I am applying to KAUST's electrical engineering master's program. I had my technical interview through Skype. I want to share what it was like to help out anyone wishing to apply to KAUST. You will be contacted for the technical interview via email. The email will include a list of topics to study and resources (books and links to material). The four main topics are: calculus, signals and systems, linear algebra, and probability. During the interview, the interviewer will send you pdf documents wth questions pertaining to each topic in them. For some topics, you will be asked to explain how you would solve the given problems to the interviewer, without actually solving them. For other topics, you will be given 15 minutes to solve the given questions after which you tell your answers to the interviewer. You may be asked additional related questions. The interviewer is trying to test the extent of your understanding. In my case, the calculus and signals and systems were discussion type questions whereas the other two topics were done in the 15-minute answer and tell format. Overall, it wasn't hard, but you should study well enough to be able to solve simple problems related to basic concepts. I wish everyone all the best
  3. How important do you guys think visiting the campus of the University you are applying to is in order to get in? How many are enrolled as students or candidates that never visited the campus previous to applying? (I am not here speaking of bring invited to campus after the fact) I plan on scheduling campus visits for August and September for my top 5 schools or the 9 I am applying to. I feel this is a good idea but not entirely sure.
  4. Yo everyone - hope you're all well, So I'm looking into getting a dual MIA-MBA degree. I basically want to get involved in international business strategy - Evaluating foreign markets, expansion, best approaches, etc. And I'm thinking that a dual MIA-MBA would be perfect. Despite the massive debt, I'd be a unique candidate - the MBA would give me solid business acumen while the MIA would help me hone my language skills and solidify my theoretical knowledge of the world economy. Now I've only got a couple years of work experience, which is a little on the low side for bschool , but given the 3 year timeline I feel like I should go for it sooner than later. I've looked at a bunch of MBA programs and I've been looking at a lot of the top MIA programs (Gtown, SAIS, HKS, Princeton, SIPA, etc.). Anyway, there is some flexibility in my plan and I'm basically wondering the following: Should I apply to both MBA and MIA programs (At Colombia, Gtown, SAIS/Tuck, Texas, etc) now or, Should I apply to MIA now (less competitive admissions process), then when I'm one year in, apply to the bschool. Anyone know if this has worked for people? Would you have a better shot of getting in given that you're already enrolled at the university? I like the idea of breaking up the application process, plus even if I didn't get in to the MBA program, it would always be an option to do the two-year MIA and then a one-year MBA afterwards too. I'm also happy to hear any thoughts/insights on my plan,the MIA in general, the MBA,or the schools I mentioned. Thanks!
  5. TL;DR - What are my chances of getting into a top statistics graduate program (either masters or doctorate) with excellent marks but little research experience? I am a student at a Canadian university ranked 151-200 in mathematics and statistics (on QS at least). My major is statistics. My GPA is a 4.30 out of a possible 4.33, and I have A+ grades in every math and stats course I have ever taken, obviously these include: calc I-III, intro algebra (theoretical version), ODEs, intro complex analysis, real analysis I and II, regression, time series, probability theory, multivariate stats. If I maintain my current GPA I am likely going to graduate inside the top three people in my graduating class (top GPA in grads this summer was 4.29). I graduate next year, but only have one semester of research experience and no publications. I am curious, for the sake of my ambitions and time + application money's sake, how likely am I to get into a top school such as Stanford/Harvard/Princeton, etc. for statistics or mathematics? I imagine mathematics (or CS) requires more of a research background than the stats does (this is coming from the advisor at my university and my research supervisor for the one semester I have). I appreciate any advice you guys can give. Thanks!
  6. Hi! I am new to this site and just created an account, so apologies if I am doing this wrong or posting in the wrong area! I am a rising senior and I am pretty certain that I want to do a masters program in PR and corporate communications wanted to ask if anyone with experience in or knowledge of these programs would be willing to share some insight into your graduate school admissions process. I am looking to apply for the Fall 2018 or Fall 2019 start dates and would love to go to NYU, but am still discovering all of the other top programs (any recommendations or insights into programs would be much appreciated, too!). I'm at the very beginning of the admissions process--I haven't begun preparing for the GRE or anything yet and am still trying to figure out the lay of the land for these programs--and I wanted to know if there was any advice you would pass down to someone in my position. -Did you use a test prep service for the GRE? -What was your GRE score and how important was the GRE in your admissions? -Were there any other forums or websites you found valuable as resources when you were doing the applications? Just trying to figure out how to get started. Any help or insight you can give me is appreciated!
  7. TL;DR - What are my chances of getting into a top statistics graduate program (either masters or doctorate) with excellent marks but little research experience? I am a student at a Canadian university ranked 151-200 in mathematics and statistics (on QS at least). My major is statistics. My GPA is a 4.30 out of a possible 4.33, and I have A+ grades in every math and stats course I have ever taken, obviously these include: calc I-III, intro algebra (theoretical version), ODEs, intro complex analysis, real analysis I and II, regression, time series, probability theory, multivariate stats. If I maintain my current GPA I am likely going to graduate inside the top three people in my graduating class (top GPA in grads this summer was 4.29). I graduate next year, but only have one semester of research experience and no publications. I am curious, for the sake of my ambitions and time + application money's sake, how likely am I to get into a top school such as Stanford/Harvard/Princeton, etc. for statistics or mathematics? I imagine mathematics (or CS) requires more of a research background than the stats does (this is coming from the advisor at my university and my research supervisor for the one semester I have). I appreciate any advice you guys can give. Thanks!
  8. I've heard that applying mid year to Australian unis (for the semester that starts in late July, early August) is a bad idea, both for your chances of getting in and for getting a scholarship. Is there any truth to this?
  9. I graduated from a top IR program in 2015, and before that was an anxiety-ridden gradcafe poster under another handle (trying to retain a little anonymity here). Scrolling through these anxious posts on a lazy Saturday morning, I want to assure that it's not as hard to get into these programs as many gradcafe posters seem to think. I had a solid GRE, mediocre GPA, decent but not exceptional work experience. I worked hard on my essays and two of my professional recommendation letter writers definitely liked me a lot (although I never saw their letters), but I was a number of years out of undergrad and the academic reference I got was from a professor in a totally unrelated field who probably barely remembered who I was. I had never had a proper IR job, had never lived in DC. It was a mixed application. But it got me into Johns Hopkins SAIS with a hefty scholarship, and a number of other top programs most of which gave me money. This is not Yale Law. You don't need a 3.96 GPA from an elite undergrad and a 98th percentile GRE/LSAT. One of my good friends at SAIS once casually referenced being happy about having cracked the 50th percentile on the math portion of the GRE. I have a number of friends that came from no-name undergrads (and of course some from Princeton, Vanderbilt, Middlebury, Boston College, Brown, etc.). If you're looking for $$$, then you probably want to pump up your GRE scores and write the best letters you possibly can. ETA: Most gradcafe-ers are probably some of the top applicants to these schools. That's why when results season comes around, you'll see lots of posts like "I can't believe I got into X school with Y dollars!"
  10. So guys I'm in a real fix and need some help. I've done my Bachelors in Electronics Engineering with a CGPA of 2.91 but during my bachelors I developed more interest towards computer science and want to pursue my masters in CS. I've gained a good amount of experience in the field through multiple software/web projects done and a lot of self reading and stuff meaning I know the core stuff such as programming,networking,data structures and algorithms, OS etc etc very well. But my degree is in Electronics as you can see which isnt closely related to CS therefore I'm not eligible for most of the MS CS programs, plus the universities that offer conversion masters are in US/UK which quite frankly I cant afford. What are my options? Need some opinions on this.
  11. I'm planning on applying for fall 2018, that being said I've started to research programs over the past months. I am interested in how humans have used the land in the past, and how we can use that information to inform the way we conserve ecosystems. Initially I was just looking at ecology programs, however I keep finding anthropology programs that seem to fit very closely with what I'm interested in. However, I'm nervous to apply to these programs since I don't have a lot of direct experience with Anthropology (besides an introductory cultural anthropology class I took as an undergrad). As an undergrad I double majored in Biology(with a focus in Ecology) and History. This year I have been working as a field technician on a project looking at how the warming climate will impact grass communities in the upper midwest. While this isn't directly related to anthropology, it has given me experience on proposing research questions, making a plans, and carrying out that research in the field (and also trouble shooting because nothing goes right when you're doing field work). So, questions: 1. Is there anything I could do to specifically make my application seem more appealing to Anthropology programs? 2. What should I keep in mind when applying to an Anthropology program? 3. Should I contact professors directly that I am interested in working with, or should I contact the departments? In ecology you contact the professors, but I've gotten mixed signals from social sciences and liberal arts. 4. If a school asks for a writing sample, what should I provide? I have some fairly long papers from my history degree. I did do a senior project in ecology, but that was presented in poster form so there is not written component to submit.
  12. Hi everyone! I'm very interested in Penn State's (not UPenn) Bioengineering PhD program, but I have not been able to find much information regarding admission stats or applicant profiles. If you have been accepted to this program or know any info about the selection process, replies would be great! I'm looking to apply for the Fall of 2018. I also have heard that some applicants to this program that were rejected were offered admission to Penn State's 1-year non-thesis masters program in Biomedical Engineering, which I wouldn't mind at for a back up situation. Have any of you participated in this program? I ultimately want to get my PhD, so I'm curious if this program would be a good segue into Penn State's PhD program. Also any opinions on how I stack up among the applicant pool at Penn State or other PhD bioengineering/biomedical engineering programs would be great. Here's an overview of my application: Overall GPA: 3.6 Major GPA: 3.8 GRE: Taking in August Research Experience: 1 semester of nanotech research for drug delivery applications summer undergrad research assistant for unrelated field (don't even know if I should include on my application) summer research assistant for bio-membrane science lab (professors both very established in the field of membrane science) will be starting and completing my honors thesis this fall (use of polyelectrolytes for virus inactivation, applications in downstream biopharmaceutical processing) Publications/Conferences: None. Honors thesis will be submitted for publication at time of application. Letters of Rec: 2 Strong LOR from well-known professors in separations science, 1 strong LOR from post-doc (probably not as strong since not from professor?) Grants/Awards: Several university scholarships and prestigious state government scholarship in my state, no grants. Don't feel competitive enough to apply for grants, thoughts? Research Interests: Biopharmaceuticals, drug delivery, regenerative medicine Extracurriculars are mostly related to leadership experience: tutor within sorority, peer mentor within College of Engineering Other schools interested in: Rutgers CSU - Fort Collins University of Arkansas Duke? Still looking around, if you have others that you think would be a good fit let me know Any input is appreciated!
  13. So guys I'm in a real fix and need some help. I've done my Bachelors in Electronics Engineering with a CGPA of 2.91 but during my bachelors I developed more interest towards computer science and want to pursue my masters in CS. I've gained a good amount of experience in the field through multiple software/web projects done and a lot of self reading and stuff meaning I know the core stuff such as programming,networking,data structures and algorithms, OS etc etc very well. But my degree is in Electronics as you can see which isnt closely related to CS therefore I'm not eligible for most of the MS CS programs, plus the universities that offer conversion masters are in US/UK which quite frankly I cant afford. What are my options? Need some opinions on this.
  14. Hi everyone. I've been looking around this forum for awhile as I've been researching Ph.D. programs in political science, and I have a few questions regarding admissions. First, let me give you some background information on myself. I attend a decently ranked regional liberal arts college in the Northeast, and I have a 3.8 GPA. I'm majoring in history (3.93 GPA) and minoring in political science (4.0 GPA). I have not taken the GREs yet. I have, however, taken a practice test without studying to see where I need the most improvement, scoring a 152 V / 153 Q. I understand these scores are not great as I am not a strong standardized test taker. After a few months of preparation, I hope to score between 157 and 160 on both sections. I have zero publication experience and minimal research experience. I've presented research at two regional conferences and recently applied to present poli sci research at a third this November. Also, I've written a 40-page thesis paper (although it was a history paper). As for work experience, I've interned for political nonprofits and legislative offices and done archival work. I've heard that work experience doesn't matter much to admissions committees, though. I plan to apply to programs with exceptionally strong political behavior programs this fall. That being said, I have a few questions. 1. I'm worried about my GRE scores. Even though I haven't taken the official test yet, I can't see my score being above 315/320. I know various admissions websites claimed to look at the application as a whole, but I'm nervous that my application will be immediately scrapped. How influential are GRE scores in the overall decision? 2. What are some strong political behavior programs? As of right now, my list of schools include Duke, Columbia, UC San Diego, OSU, UC Davis, Minnesota, Northwestern, UVA, UFL, and UC Irvine. 3. While my current undergraduate institution is a decently ranked regional liberal arts college, I'm worried that it won't be prestigious enough to get into any of the schools listed above. Is this justified? 4. Because I go to a liberal arts college, it's difficult to find open research assistant positions. Is my minimal research and publication experience a large issue? 5. Like I said, I've heard that work experience doesn't count for much when applying to Ph.D. programs. Is this assumption correct? If my GRE scores exceed my expectations, I think I could be considered a strong candidate. Regardless, I would appreciate any advice. Thanks!
  15. I really did just begin the process of thinking about and researching doctorate programs, so please be gentle when correcting any glaring examples of complete ignorance (although please do correct me). I am an art conservator with a professional background in historical materials (I currently work at a history museum and also work in the conservation of library and archival materials) and an academic background in art history. I am interested in studying the idea of preservation of art and historical materials as a "Public Trust," as written in so many museum and library mission statements but rarely reflected in local or larger public policy. I am particularly interested in how this self-imposed mission influences both the way in which artwork and historical artifacts are preserved and how the public and government access and interact with those materials. I have been researching various programs under various departments and feel as though my interest and research could fall under so many different umbrellas. History? Art history/ visual studies? Public policy? Sociology? I would really appreciate it if I could get a few opinions to help focus my search for possible avenues. I am not so much looking for advice on specific programs or schools- just more generally some opinions on where my research interests may best fall. Thank you in advance for you help!
  16. All, Bottom line up front, I am trying to decide on exactly which side I fall of a particular line. My deepest interests lie in International Political Economy and Economic history, specifically sanctions, conflict in the context of the liberal world order (military, diplomatic and economic), American Grand Strategy, deterrence, foreign aid and the weaponization of second world countries by first world countries through investment, proxy players and their effects on the global economy, formation and break up of supernational government organizations and the reactions of G20 governments to global economic developments. I know there's a lot there but I promise it's very thought out and I believe I can make a life out of developing questions from this and pursuing answers to those questions. My academic background is as follows: Undergrad: Top 50 State school, Tier 1 Research, BS Business Management, 3.55 GPA, sufficient math Grad: Unranked program but decent institution (T40-60), currently pursuing MA Economics, expect to graduate 3.9-4.0 GRE: 164V/154Q/4.5 AW (will retake for quant, feeling confident) Research Experience: 1 semester paid RA with Insurance Professor working on government project, no publication (project got scrapped because of political unpopularity during election season) Professional Data: At time of application will have 4 years commissioned military experience LOR: It's a ways off but for this purpose let's assume I'll get 3 glowing recommendations from professors from my current program, well known Misc: No publications yet (hope to change by end of MA), graduated undergrad in 3 years, grad program is heterodox and applied My real concern is whether this is strictly a Political Science dream or whether Economics is a possible path forward. The question exists for 2 reasons: Economists like Michael Munger have made a name for themselves in Political Science contexts, but it seems harder for a PoliSci type to seriously break into Economics circles. Second, with my academic profile, getting into a top 40 PoliSci program seems iffy, but getting into a top 100 Economics program seems quite plausible assuming I perform well on the GRE retake and in my masters... and the current consensus seems to be that a top 100 economics PhD is more employable than a PoliSci phd outside the top 40. As an economist I would develop skills in quant areas and could use that to push the narrative of my research and as a PoliSci I might have more clout in the IR world at the kind of think tanks I'd love to work at. I'd also consider working in research for Congress or other parts of the government but ultimately this is an academic question. Perhaps the question can best be summed up as: Which field would professionally enable me to pursue the 'most' of my interests, with respect to my current qualifications and employability of the degree? -tanker12
  17. Hello, I'm interested in the one year Master of Science in Public Policy program at NYU's Wagner School. It seems like a pretty unique program to me, and I'm having trouble finding any information about acceptance rates or thoughts on past applicants. etc. Does anyone have any thoughts about this program or is anyone else applying/does anyone know any admissions statistics? Thank you! - M
  18. Hey guys I thought it would be good to start a thread for people applying for genetic counseling school for Fall 2017. I am starting to prepare for the GRE and the supplemental materials of the application since I will be in the midst of finals when applications are due. I would love to talk to more people about genetic counseling school who are also applying or have applied previously. I am just now getting a list of programs that I want to apply to, which includes: Northwestern University, Emory University, University of South Carolina, Stanford University, CSU Stanislaus, Boston University, University of Michigan, and UT Houston.
  19. Hello, I am planning to apply to grad schools for Spring of 2018 and Fall of 2018. I just recently graduate with a Bachelor's Degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders degree. I am planning to take a gap year if I decide to not apply to grad schools for the Spring of 2018, especially if I get a position as an SLPA. I have a lot of volunteers and shadowing hours and my GRE scores (after taking it a third time) are pretty decent. (156 V; 154 Q; 5 W) My only problem though is my GPA... I have a 3.123 for my last 60 credits and a 3.0 overall GPA... I know that schools look at the GRE and GPA greatly and I was wondering if there was any hope in getting in at any school at all or if there was any way I can get my GPA up some even after graduating? I know there are Post-Bacc classes, but I am under the impression those are mainly for people who have a Bachelor's in another field of study. Any tips schools that anyone knows about that looks at the whole application as a whole instead of just the GPA and GRE will be helpful! Thank you!
  20. Hi all, I'm looking for some advice on gaining research experience. I am hoping to apply to MA/MS Programs in Counseling Psychology (I've got my eye on UK and Southern Illinois for my top choices) for Fall 2019, with the end goal of eventually getting my PhD. My undergraduate GPA was pretty terrible, but my GRE scores are solid, I am re-taking the two psych courses I did poorly in, and by the time I apply I will have four years experience working as a Mental Health Case Manager. I'm hoping I can get accepted going the masters route and show I am capable of good grades and go from there. So my question is, even for masters programs most say research experience really strengthens your application....where should I look to find research experience ? I did two research based courses in undergrad, and in one I worked with a team to create and run an experiment and presented for Psi Chi...but that's the extent of my research and that was almost five years ago. I've tried applying to some part-time research positions at the local university, but they are limited and I have had no luck getting interviews. Any ideas of where else to look? Will universities take on volunteer research assistants ? What have other people's experiences been with admissions to MA/MS programs (do they look a lot at research, are they generally competitive, will a good GRE help to balance out a poor GPA?)? Thanks all!
  21. Hey, so I've been admitted to UBC, Texas A&M and UC, Irvine for their grad programs in chemistry. I'm more than confused with where to go. By ranking UBC is higher but only by a bit. All the schools have professors that I'm interested in and have been corresponding. The other major difference is the stipend, UBC offers $21000+one time 2000. A&M 24000, UCI 29500. Which school is the best place all around? When it comes to living and work. P. S. I'm an international student so US or Canada will be a new experience to me. And I'm mostly interested in inorganic chemistry
  22. Twiddle your thumbs Binge-watch a show on Netflix / AmazonPrime / Hulu Check GradCafe once an hour Do distance searches on GoogleMaps between your current residence and each of your desired programs Find out when your desired programs' Admitted Students days are and check flight or drive options Get super invested in a video game (online or otherwise) Re-read the Harry Potter series (because of course we've all read it at least once) Take up knitting Take up jogging Take up mud wrestling Get a massage Buy a crossword or sudoku book and immerse yourself in words or numbers Make mix CDs or playlists, and really think about how songs can go together Buy a cheap musical instrument and teach yourself to play Spend quality time with a dog, whether it's a friend's, a neighbor's, a family member's, or your own Do the above with a cat and pretend it's reciprocal Make lists of favorites - favorite books, movies, TV shows, songs, albums, potato chips - and share them with friends Create spreadsheet inventories of your books and other media Do a serious top-to-bottom cleaning of your room / apartment / home Go to a local coffee shop for an hour a day and imagine yourself as someone from a different walk of life each time ... By no means an exhaustive list, and mostly tongue-in-cheek...but feel free to add to it!
  23. Hi there has anyone heard back from csula yet ? Do they require interviews ? I've applied for the ms in counseling school psychology and I am a green card holder, does anyone know if I'm considered domestic or international ? Im very anxious to find out if I'm accepted or not.. but feeling a bit of a lost hope because it's already mid march and I haven't heard anything !!
  24. I've narrowed down my final two choices for a PhD beginning Fall '17 to Johns Hopkins University's Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (School of Engineering) and Brown University's Department of Biostatistics (School of Public Health). I've been accepted at both. I'm interested in applied statistics (I have work experience in data science and an M.S. already), so biostatistics sounds like a natural fit. I'm curious about the reputation of the Brown program. It seems small but mighty! My concern is that by going to Brown, I'm throwing away the opportunity to rub shoulders with JHU Biostatistics (they rejected me), but I suspect it's better to like the department you're in rather than the department you're near. I haven't heard much about JHU AMS. Thanks in advance for your $0.02.
  25. Has anyone recently applied to the Map Your Future program at Fletcher? If so, what did your profile look like and do you have any important tips to offer? Appreciate the help!