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Found 150 results

  1. Hi friends, Just curious, but what is the teaching load required for funding at your school? Obv. this varies from package to package, and if you don't want to share which school you go do, that's super cool. Where I'm coming from: I was offered a package where I would teach my own class right of the bat this upcoming fall, and if I had testicles, they'd have climbed up between my lungs for comfort. Is this normal? Not my imaginary testicles thing, but conducting your own class first thing?
  2. Hello Aspiring Art Students, I am a long time follower of this forum - it helped me immensely when I was applying to grad schools myself. I have been perusing some of these recent threads, and a lot of you seem to have many unanswered questions about how this all works - and "this" can encompass many things. I work in art academia currently, and I will be the first to admit that the grad school application process is mystifying while pertinent information is often elusive. I struggled with this exact problem during my time looking at grad schools. But having now been through the process myself, I have learned some (but not all) answers. Being a professor currently, it is really disheartening to see just how many aspiring students, who do good work, get lost in this process. While I sincerely do want to help, it would be way too much for me to respond to each of these questions individually. Yet, after seeing what some of you are asking and the confusion within, I am wondering if some of you would be interested in some one-on-one consulting, via email or the like. It would be simply too overwhelming to take this on as something casual - and usually, this is what professors get paid to do, in addition to just teaching during the semester. What I can offer you, so that it does not become too insane, is this (and I realize this sounds kind of skeezy to post on a forum, but bear with me): For, let's say, $20 I can offer all y'all any of the following: Provide standard paragraph sized answers to four general questions about this whole perplexing process, or For an hour's time, I will look over your portfolio and help you narrow down choices of what to include, give advice, etc, or I will do one round of reading and editing one document you may have questions about; this can be your statement, letter of intent, a CV, etc - whichever one of these you think you may need help with the most, or if there is any other reasonable thing that you may need help with, I can look into that as well, or If you happen to be in the same geographic location as I am, I would be happy to meet face to face for an hour's time. I'd also possibly be open to doing an hour of Skype if absolutely warranted - though I sincerely believe Skype is terrible and should not be used in the admissions process, but I digress. Here's a little about me to just let you know I am not just some crackpot without any clout: When I was applying to grad schools, I applied to fifteen schools and got into seven; four of those schools offered me significant financial aid, if not a fully funded MFA, I went to a top tier MFA program in the New York City area, I have been accepted into several residencies, including Vermont Studio Center, I have shown internationally, I have been published, I have been teaching for just about 3 full years now; I have taught at two research 1's, a small liberal arts college, and a community college, (and if you do not know the difference between a R1 and a SLAC, you need to before you send out applications), This past semester I helped one of my students get into a competitive international study abroad program at a top international school doing the same thing I am offering here, I have connected some of my students to various institutions for residencies, jobs, etc - I have provided them face-time with very successful artists, I have been paid to give professional practices presentations to classes, I myself have been awarded an upcoming year long, fully funded residency where three slots are awarded out of over two hundred and fifty applications. My personal work is mostly focused in installation, photography, performance and new media. I do not paint - though I went to a really painting heavy program and can offer some insight in that regard. So, you know, I am not trying to prove my worth here, but I do have an idea of what I am talking about. And look, for all that, there is PLENTY I have been rejected from or failed at (which is something we can talk about also). I also obviously cannot promise you that you will get into Yale based on talking to me, or any other specific program. But, if any of you need help navigating all of this, I actually would like to help in a way that I can. If any of you need help and are interested, please feel free to send me a private message - we can go from there as to what you might need and how to achieve it. And feel free to ask any logistical questions about anything I did not cover here. I should also mention that my focus in my work is not necessarily solely commercial - I am much more personally interested in contributing to discourse than I am in doing the gallery circuits. I say this because if your dream is to be Anslem Kiefer or Takashi Murikami and show at Gagosian and only make art to make oodles of money, I will probably be not the best person to talk to. I can give you insights about the various gallery scenes, but that is not where my focus is. In the meantime, good luck to all of you! Believe me, I know how hard it is out there - if something does not happen for you, please do not get discouraged. Though this sucks to always hear, rejection really is just a part of the process. Also, be diligent to really look through this forum and the past years of postings - there is some really valuable information in these threads if you take the time to search through them. One more thing: be sure to check out The Professor is In - Karen Kelsky is not arts based, but she offers a wealth of fantastic general academic information. Edit: Tell you what, let's do this - the first three people to ask me something on this thread, I will respond to the best of my ability. Be sure to ask something general or not so specific that it cannot relate to anyone else besides yourself.
  3. I am currently in the process of selecting Quantitative Psychology programs to apply to in the Fall. In doing this research, I came across a program that has one professor accepting graduate students. His research interests and mine work well together, and I thought this would be a good program to apply to. However, I realized in searching the website that there are no current quantitative psychology graduate students listed. This seems very unusual to me, but their admission statistics suggest this is a distinct possibility. Would you apply somewhere that doesn't have other graduate students in your area? Is this a red flag? I'm not certain how to interpret this.
  4. Hello Friends, As this academic year is coming to a close, and MPH applications will be opening in just 6ish (months depending on where you're applying to of course!), I thought a thread for us to discuss, share our thoughts, feelings, fears, and the trials and tribulations of MPH applications would be helpful. I also find it helpful to know who's applying where I'm excited to start this journey and I'm hoping we all see acceptance letters/emails in under a year! Schools/programs I plan to apply to: UBC MPH UBC MSc in PPH (still need to start looking for a supervisor, how soon is too soon?) SFU MPH
  5. Hi all, So after taking two years off after completing my B.Sc. in Canada, I'm preparing to apply for graduate schools for a clinical psychology doctoral program specializing in neuropsychology. I know these sorts of programs are extremely competitive, so I will likely be applying to 18-20 schools, but thought I would post some of my application credentials and get any advice from anyone willing to give it! Education: B.Sc. with Honor's in Psychology, Minor in Biology. Completed an Honor's Thesis in my final year in cognitive neuroscience. GPA: Overall: 3.3 (first 2 years of B.Sc. were as a Biomedical Science major, which I did not enjoy, and my GPA reflects this). Major GPA: 3.8 Last 2 years/60 credits: 3.8 GRE Scores: Psychology Subject GRE: 750 (91st percentile) General GRE (taking this in the next few weeks, likely will be around 156V/160Q/5.0AW) LOR: 2 clinical neuropsychologists (Honor's thesis supervisor and current work supervisor; both on admissions committees for CN programs at 2 different schools), 1 supervisor who is also a clinical psychologist (supervisor from Developmental Psychology lab mentioned below) Experience: 4 poster presentations Honor's thesis (supervised by a clinical neuropsychologist, see LOR above) and Independent Research Project (supervised by Neuroscientist) Volunteered at 2 hospitals, 3 different research labs in my last 2 years of undergraduate studies Moved from Toronto, Canada to San Diego, California after graduating with my B.Sc. to work as a Lab Manager in a Developmental Psychology lab and then as a Research Coordinator in a Neuropsychology lab (multi-site project; still currently here - see LOR above). I guess I am worried that my GRE scores will make my applications less competitive. I feel as though my applications are well-rounded elsewhere and my time off and additional experience has helped me. I do not have any location preferences and will be applying all throughout North America. Any and all advice or insight is welcome! Also, please don't hesitate to mention any schools that you guys know of which are very reputable for CN! Some on my radar include: SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program, Drexel, Boston University, Northwestern University (Feinberg), University of Florida, University of Houston, University of Wisconsin... Thank you!!
  6. Hi, I graduated from my bachelors (BA in Social Sciences) in 2013. When I graduated I was very confused about what I wanted to do, so I decided to move home and work for a before applying for Masters. I took a job in market (qualitative) research about a month after graduating - mostly because of a general interest in culture and human psychology. I stuck around for 2 years because I was told it wouldn't look good if I left earlier, but by the end of it I was sure I did not want to make it a career. I then went into brand consulting, but left after 8 months because the place I worked at was not well managed at all - there were frequent (very) late nights, having to do work that I did not have the skills for and lack of proper training and poor management meant that I was absolutely burnt out by the end of those 8 months. So I quit without another job in hand or a back up plan, which they say you should never do, and took 2 months to just recuperate. I then (on a whim, really) applied for an internship at a think tank in my city where I worked on the website and editorial team - collecting and creating content. I enjoyed this much more than my previous 2 jobs (I think I just liked the people I was working with much more). At this point, aware that I had already worked at 3 different places, I began to feel the pressure to commit to a field of study for my Masters, so I "chose" public policy, even though I haven't actually worked in a policy research think tank and am still not 100% sure I'm passionate about the subject. I am now looking to apply for Masters in Public Policy for fall 2018. To fill my time until then, as I realize most places will not hire someone just for a year, nor do I want to get into the rigmarole of settling into a full time job, I am looking to apply for policy research internships. However, this will mean that I have worked at 4 different places in as many years. How bad will this look on my application? Will universities be wary and think my application looks scattered and confused based on all the different places I have worked? Any feedback would be much appreciated. Thank you!
  7. TL;DR - What are my chances of getting into a top statistics graduate program (either masters or doctorate) with excellent marks but little research experience? I am a student at a Canadian university ranked 151-200 in mathematics and statistics (on QS at least). My major is statistics. My GPA is a 4.30 out of a possible 4.33, and I have A+ grades in every math and stats course I have ever taken, obviously these include: calc I-III, intro algebra (theoretical version), ODEs, intro complex analysis, real analysis I and II, regression, time series, probability theory, multivariate stats. If I maintain my current GPA I am likely going to graduate inside the top three people in my graduating class (top GPA in grads this summer was 4.29). I graduate next year, but only have one semester of research experience and no publications. I am curious, for the sake of my ambitions and time + application money's sake, how likely am I to get into a top school such as Stanford/Harvard/Princeton, etc. for statistics or mathematics? I imagine mathematics (or CS) requires more of a research background than the stats does (this is coming from the advisor at my university and my research supervisor for the one semester I have). I appreciate any advice you guys can give. Thanks!
  8. For those applying for Fall 2018 admittance in geography programs.
  9. Undergrad Institution: Stony Brook University (Large State School, has a good reputation for my majors) Major(s): Physics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics Minor(s): GPA: 3.35 (AMS GPA is 3.6) bad grades mostly in sophomore year. Type of Student: International, Male, South Asian GRE General Test: Will be taking soon. Anticipating > 95% V scores but around 90% Q score. GRE Subject Test in Mathematics: How important is it that I take this? I don't really have time to study for another test on top of the GRE and my demanding final year schedule. Programs Applying: Masters in Statistics/Masters in Data Science Ideally I want to apply for Phd programs but given my crappy undergrad record, I've decided to apply for masters and see if I can get into the Phd programs later on. Research Experience: Essentially none. Did some linguistics research not related to statistics with a pretty famous guy but that was a while ago and no paper came out of it. Awards/Honors/Recognitions: Deans List, Physics Honor Society. Pertinent Activities or Jobs: Irrelevant on-campus job for 3 years and currently doing a data analyst internship at a very small marketing agency. Letters of Recommendation: The School is HUGE and all my classes are >100. Its very hard to get to know professors and this is likely the weakest aspect of my application. I will get recommendations from professors I've taken courses with and gotten As but that's about it. I don't even expect them to remember me or know who I am and I just don't see any way around this. I can try to cultivate some relationships till application time in December but I don't really know how to or how successful I will be. Courser Work: Math and Stat Courses: Survey of Probability and Stats (A), Probability Theory (A-), Combinatorics (A-), Data Analysis (A), Deterministic Models (A), Statistical Lab (Basically a course on R programming and SAS), Calculus 1,2,3,4(Taken in Sophomore year so grades are mostly Bs and a C in multivariate), Linear Algebra(A-). Probability and Statistics for Data Science (In Progress) Physics Courses that may be relevant: Quantum Mechanics (Some probability and lots of Linear Algebra)(B-), Statistical Mechanics (Lots of probability)(B-) Computer Science courses: Object Oriented Programming (A), Data Structures (A-), Analysis of Algorithms (In Progress), Probability and Statistics for Data Science (In Progress), Computational Geometry (combined course by Computer Science and Applied Math department also in progress). Online MOOCs: 4 course specialization in Python by Uni on Michigan (Coursera), 10 course Specialization on Data Science by JHU (Coursera), Machine Learning Course by Andrew Ng (Coursera). Applying to Where: Iowa State - MS Statistics UW Madison - MS Data Science UC Davis - MS Statistics U Iowa - MS Statistics Rice - MS Statistics Rutgers - MS Data Science (Statistics track) UI Chicago - MS Statistics U of Colarado Denver - MS Statistics USC - MS Data Science UIUC - MS Statistics UT Austin - MS Statistics Georgia Tech - MS Statistics Northwestern - MS Analytics JHU - MS Statistics Some of these schools are obviously reach school and are not realistic but I'm extremely worried about my GPA and recommendation letters. If this doesn't work out for me, I essentially have nothing to turn to so there's a lot riding on this. My GPA is mostly bad cause of sophomore year courses which included important things like multivariate calculus and Physics courses which are either freaking hard at this school or just didn't jive with me. Math and Stats otherwise is pretty decent. How can I improve my application? Is there anything here I can leverage? How can I build enough rapport with a prof to get a good recommendation letter in 1 semester? Do you have any other advice or suggestions? Any other programs you think I should consider? Any other Specific courses I should take?
  10. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated! Bachelors: Psychology Masters of Science: Human Cognitive Neuropsychology Undergrad overall GPA (I had one horrible semester): 3.465 Undergrad Psychology GPA: 3.8 I am a horrible test taker: -GRE Verbal: 149; 42% -GRE Quant: 146; 24% -GRE Writing: 4.5; 82% Research experience: 3 years (Research technician in EEG , fMRI and clinical lab); 3 years (Project coordinator at upper limb prosthesis research lab) Clinical experience: 3 years (Clinical lab working with patients with ASD, dyslexia and schizophrenia and assist with writing neuropsych reports); 1 year (clinical lab learning how to administer cognitive measures and shadowing Clinical Psychologist). Teaching experience: Taught two one-hour courses to research interns on EEG data analysis and protocol for conducting research with at risk populations. Supervised training of summer interns at Neuroimaging lab. Abstract submission and Poster presentation: 5 (3 secondary author @ VA medical center; 2 first authors @ Dubrovnik Conference on Cognitive Science VI; and @ University of Edinburgh, respectively). Publications: 6 (2 second author, 3 third authorships). Potential publication by time I submit PHD applications: 9 (three manuscripts currently under review) Race: Black Gender: Male Languages speak and understand: English (fluent), French (can semi comprehend and speak), creole (can semi-comprehend a little difficulty speaking) Schools applying to, in order of preference: 1. Yale University 2. Harvard University 3. University of Pennsylvania 4. University of Michigan 5. University of Iowa 6. Temple University 7. DUKE University 8. University of Oregon 9. Indiana University Bloomington 10. Washington State University 11. Boston University 12. The university of Vermont 13. The University of Maine 14. University of Missouri, Kansas City 15. George Mason University 16. Eastern Michigan University 17. University of Wisconsin-Madison 18. University of Wyoming
  11. Long time lurker, first time poster; have mercy. Many people on this forum put their stats up online for people to know their background and to evaluate what their chances are. Yet something has always struck me as odd with this. Whenever anyone details their previous institutions they always put something along the lines of, "top 50 research university", or something along those lines. Why the anonymity? Unless you're study at a super small institutions I would think it virtually impossible for anyone to find out who anyone is. Is it to do with people wanting their anonymity? Is it to prevent bickering over institution rankings? Are people worried that admissions officers will know that we check for application updates every two minutes? Can someone please shine a light on this topic? Tune in next week same bat-time, same bat-channel
  12. Hi guys! I'm new to gradcafe and really need some opinions that aren't from my mom (who tells me I need to calm down and that I'm so smart ). I'm going into my senior year of undergrad as a health studies major with a minor in communicative sciences and disorders. I have a major GPA of 3.74, cumulative GPA of 3.53, and minor GPA of 3.83. I've worked as an aide/companion for a 17 year old with Down Syndrome, as a nanny for 3 children, one of which who has sensory processing disorder, and as an on-campus tutor at my undergrad school. I've also accepted a job as a peer mentor for the school of health studies where I will work with freshman and sophomores as a support system and for guidance. I've interned at a pediatric facility since freshman year and have over 150 logged hours of observation, with a portfolio. My mentor at the facility has also brought up talking about a therapy aide job once the fall begins. I've run a book drive on my own to send books over to Africa and I've logged hours in hospitals in the areas of TBI and stroke. Basically, I do anything I have the opportunity to do and I do all of it well (somehow, I really shock myself.). I know my LoR will be really great and I'm hoping my personal statement will be too! What's really stressing me out is my GRE scores. I've taken them twice. So far my best is Verbal 150, QR 149, AW 4.5. I'm aware that these scores are not competitive, but do you think everything else will overshadow my less-than-stellar GRE scores? Any advice and consolation would be so appreciated!! Thank you in advance.
  13. So, Last year I applied to graduate schools. I didn't get into any of my schools but I did get feedback from almost all of them. The only thing they could all say was that I had no publications. Unfortunately, this is rather hard to fix. Since then I have been working as a field technician in my field (ecology) and I have talked to my PI about authorship. She said that I can take an active role in the papers that come from the research I'm doing, but that these papers likely won't be even closed to published when I apply to graduate school. Since this was my only feedback last time I applied, does anyone have any additional advice on improving my application, since these papers won't be on there? Some general stats: Graduated in 2016 with a BS in Biology: Ecology and a BA in History from the University of Texas: Austin GPA: 3.5 GRE Verbal: 85th percentile GRE Quant: 51st percentile GRE Writing: 90th percentile Research Experience: Worked in labs since my freshman year, internship at the EPA, senior project and poster presented at my university's poster fair, field technician position, a poster at the end of this summer and most likely a paper eventually. I'm planning on retaking the GRE in September to hopefully improve the quantitative score. Not much I can do about my GPA at this point.
  14. I'm planning on applying for fall 2018, that being said I've started to research programs over the past months. I am interested in how humans have used the land in the past, and how we can use that information to inform the way we conserve ecosystems. Initially I was just looking at ecology programs, however I keep finding anthropology programs that seem to fit very closely with what I'm interested in. However, I'm nervous to apply to these programs since I don't have a lot of direct experience with Anthropology (besides an introductory cultural anthropology class I took as an undergrad). As an undergrad I double majored in Biology(with a focus in Ecology) and History. This year I have been working as a field technician on a project looking at how the warming climate will impact grass communities in the upper midwest. While this isn't directly related to anthropology, it has given me experience on proposing research questions, making a plans, and carrying out that research in the field (and also trouble shooting because nothing goes right when you're doing field work). So, questions: 1. Is there anything I could do to specifically make my application seem more appealing to Anthropology programs? 2. What should I keep in mind when applying to an Anthropology program? 3. Should I contact professors directly that I am interested in working with, or should I contact the departments? In ecology you contact the professors, but I've gotten mixed signals from social sciences and liberal arts. 4. If a school asks for a writing sample, what should I provide? I have some fairly long papers from my history degree. I did do a senior project in ecology, but that was presented in poster form so there is not written component to submit.
  15. I figured I'd go ahead and start this thread. I know it's a bit early, but who's ready? This will be my second cycle. I was rejected from four schools this past cycle, but according to one of my favorite songs, "You've got to lose to know how to win" (Aerosmith /\A/\). I know what I need to do this time around. I'm ready. Were you rejected this year? Or will this be your first time? What schools are you considering? Good luck everyone. A year from right now (2/24/17) we will have good news to share with each other.
  16. · A few weeks ago, I was asked to talk to first-year M.A. students about the Ph.D. application process. I prepared a list of what I figure to be key elements, and I figure it might be useful to many on GC who are preparing to go down this path as well. I'm quite certain that some of these points are purely subjective and open to discussion / debate, but having gone through the process a couple of times now, these items ring true based on my experiences and observations. ---------------- Others have surely told you about the state of the industry, so I’m just going to assume that you already know the “there are no jobs” spiel. · Others have also surely told you about how relatively difficult it is to get into a Ph.D. program—I have yet to hear of a program that admits over 10% of applicants. o Because of this, if you are committed to applying to Ph.D. programs, I strongly recommend considering applying to at least ten. Even though merit is a critical part of determining who gets in, there is a very real element of “luck of the draw” which pure numbers will help to mitigate. · With that in mind, NOW is a good time to get started on your program research · Your first consideration when entering the process should be to determine what era you would like to study, and ideally a general sense of methodologies you want to employ. These elements will be reflected in the two most important components of your application: the Statement of Purpose (or SoP), and your Writing Sample (WS). · Some basics: o The SoP and WS should ideally work together o When thinking about potential areas of study, avoid proposing transatlantic or transhistorical concepts: admissions committees are still very much set up by period, and your application should be easily sorted into a field group (i.e. you’re clearly a Romanticist, or you’re clearly a 20th century Americanist). o GRE scores, GPA, and other elements are important, but remember that the things you can control the most at this stage are the WS and SoP. o Given the importance of these two documents, you will want to get as many eyes on them as possible as soon as possible. § My SoP and WS were read and commented on by at least five professors and several fellow students, and ultimately went through at least six rounds of revision each—several of them top-to-bottom revisions. · There are multiple factors to consider when looking at programs. Some of the most important include: o Are there multiple professors actively working in your chosen field § I personally used a “rule of three”—if a program had three professors with significant research overlap with my interests, I would consider it. § By “active” I mean that you should be able to find publication credits from within the past five years—they need to be in touch with current scholarship. o What level of financial support do they offer—not just the annual funding, but whether they fund in summer, and how many years of funding are guaranteed o What courses have they offered in the past? What courses are they offering in the fall? o What is the teaching load like, and how do they prepare you for that load? o So-called rankings matter to a certain extent, but remember that those rankings are almost completely arbitrary. USNews rankings are helpful as a list of all programs offering Ph.D.s in English…and a very, very general sense of the strong programs vs. the less strong. But FIT with your interests trumps all. § (E.g. the Strode program at U of A is highly regarded, even though U of A itself is somewhat less so) o Location and cost of living. A 20k stipend will get you a lot further in Lincoln, Nebraska than in New York. And elements like small town vs. large city, cold vs. warm climate etc. are all perfectly valid factors when looking at programs. You’ll have to live in this place for 4-6 years, after all! · A few quick and random tips: o It can be helpful to contact professors ahead of time to determine research fit etc., but it can also be quite valuable to contact current grad students to get a sense of the program and the environment. o Remember that an important part of professionalization in a Ph.D. program is publication. More than anything, this means that before you go down the road toward application, give some serious thought to whether or not your writing and research inclinations have that kind of potential. And whether or not that’s something you really want to deal with at all. o Also remember that teaching is a huge part of your job, and always will be. If you don’t enjoy teaching (or the prospect of teaching), you’d better really love the other components of your position, because there’s not going to be any getting away from it for many, many years. o It might go without saying, but be very courteous in all of your communications with professors and other graduate students. And that courtesy should be sincere! o Consider the total cost of applications: application fees average about $75, sending GRE scores is $27 (more if you need the subject test), and if you have multiple transcripts, that can tack on another $10. In other words, each application will likely be upward of $100. Given that I recommend applying to at least ten programs, you’re looking at a commitment of over $1000. There ARE fee waivers you can find, however. o Forums like GradCafe are a good way to socialize with fellow applicants, and commiserate with people in the same situation. Just remember to take all advice you see on those forums with a grain of salt. o Finally, there are NO SAFETY SCHOOLS. Just to reiterate, rankings are arbitrary, and almost every program gets ten times as many applicants as they can admit (let alone fund). As a result, you want to look at the best overall fit for you.
  17. Welcome! I figure it's time to kick things off for 2017, exactly a year to the date the previous thread was made. It's that time of year where there's a million things to do to get applications ship-shape, school choices need to be made and there is a lot to think about! Best of Luck everybody- let's hear where everyone is thinking of applying to, research interests and the like. I'm a Brit, obviously, so will be an international student which will make the process that little bit harder, but hey- I love a challenge! Research Interests: I have very disparate research interests, focusing on hazard reduction, land-use change, technology, humanitarian aid, disaster response, remote sensing and UAV technology. Applying to: At the moment, I have a firm list of 4, with 4 or 5 others to finalise. University of Michigan Michigan State University of Washington University of Wisconsin-Madison. University of Colorado (Boulder) UC Berkeley Penn State Cornell Rutgers Academic Profile: Consistently very good grades- GPA equivalent of 3.8/4.0. Led two research expeditions funded by major UK organisations. Strong extracurriculars. Should have very good LORs too. One very good GRE score, one very bad GRE score (we'll just have to see how that plays out).
  18. Hi friends. Is it time to open this forum up to 2018 applicants yet? What's everyone working on/stressing about? Hellooooooo I'm dying here.
  19. Anyone have any wisdom on STARTING personal statements? I have no idea where to begin. Of course, I've done some research and viewed samples but I just don't know where to start. Help?
  20. Hi everyone! I am a Canadian student interested in applying to Clinical Psychology graduate schools in the States and have a few questions about the process and schools. Any help would be greatly appreciated 1. I read that each school provides different levels of funding for their students. Is this funding generally for U.S. citizens? Or does it vary by school? Does anyone know any schools that provide good funding for international students? 2. Is there a big difference between PhD programs in private universities vs. non-private? Is one better than the other or are they generally the same? 3. There are so many APA-accredited schools, any advice on how to narrow the selection down? Other than location and faculty accepting students. 4. How much weight do schools put on the GRE? I have a really strong background in research with a few publications in the works as well as a strong GPA. However, my GRE scores are not that great (155V, 155Q, 5W) - will this significantly lower my chances? Any other advice would be great! Thanks, S.
  21. This is precisely what the title suggests. Invite everyone planning to apply for a master's course in the field of Music to share concerns, updates here. And I request everyone already enrolled in such programmes to help us out. @Musicologist I am personally confused between Musicology and Ethnomusicology and want to find out more about Music therapy as a programme. Any disussion around it is much appreciated!
  22. Anyone starting applications/starting to look at applications for the season? I figured I would start a thread here. I'm planning on applying to Rhetoric programs (some in English departments and some in Comm departments). Tentative list: Comm Departments: UNC, Northwestern, Michigan State (WRAC), Georgia, Texas (Austin), South Carolina and Wake Forest. English Dept: Michigan, Ohio State, Miami of OH, UCDavis.
  23. Hi all! I'm a hopeful applicant for PhD programs for Fall 2017 in social work. Thought I'd start this thread to see who else is in the same boat! A little background: I graduated from UNC's MSW program in 2013 and have been working as an outpatient clinician since this time. I'm EMDR and intensively DBT trained and am licensed in clinical social work and substance abuse and my research interests are primarily in the field of substance abuse and trauma. I'm looking around for schools in the southeast due to some family reasons but am open to other programs that would be a good fit with my interests. Just took the GRE yesterday and got a Verbal: 162 Quant: 152. Pretty mediocre but hopefully acceptable somewhere!! SO far I'm thinking UGA, UNC, VCU, University of Maryland
  24. All music fields and degrees welcome! There was a great thread for this last year and I wanted to get one started for this year (there is one already but it is targeted towards MA only). Applications in? Heard anything yet? I just submitted my last application yesterday (music theory) and have already been rejected by two schools.
  25. Hi all! No one had made this post yet (is the Classics corner of GradCafé slowly dying?!) so I figured I'd take the plunge. Who is applying for Classics and Classics-adjacent programs this cycle? What are your fields and interests? What are your hopes and dreams? (I am not applying myself and am happily ensconced in my own PhD program, but am happy to answer any questions about applications, interviews, or life as a PhD student)