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Found 800 results

  1. Hey all, I am planning on applying to graduate school in statistics. Would you recommend taking the math subject test? Thank you
  2. Need some help, thought I'd make an account an ask...Do I have any chance of getting into a decent Stats PhD? I'm a junior attending an "elite" US institution (top 15), but don't have a solid GPA (3.54). I'm majoring in Stats and Economics, and my major GPA is around a 3.6. I've taken calculus and linear algebra, but have no advanced math classes, although I do plan on taking real analysis in the Fall. I have no research experience. I don't have a great relationship with any of my professors. ...All that said, how screwed am I? I literally never considered a PhD before this month, so I never bothered to research or do anything. At this point, I'm left coasting on my university's name, which I'm still not sure will get me anywhere. If anyone could chance me in general and recommend me schools that I could actually get into, I would be highly appreciative. My top two schools are Rice and UTAustin at this point, but I'm not sure I could get into either... Edit: Haven't taken the GRE yet, but I'm expecting a 90% percentile+ in the Quantitative section...I feel like the only thing I can do is standardized tests. I'll probably look into the Math GRE subject test as well and try to study over the summer...
  3. I have been accepted to two schools(UCLA and University of Washington) in Aerospace PhD program without funding. Both are good enough for me in terms of the research interest but both of them didn't get me any funding. Is it a good idea to enroll and look for funding after or should I just reapply next year?
  4. Hi, I'm interested in applying this December for a PhD Clinical Psychology program for Fall 2018. I have a few questions regarding how to know what schools to apply to and determining what schools are schools I would be able to get into. My background: Behavioral Neuroscience major and computer science minor at Northeastern University graduating in May 2018, 3.5 overall GPA, 3.67 behavioral neuroscience GPA, and 3.75 Psychology GPA. I have 4 publications (first author of 2, one pertaining to autism research). I have done 2 six month coops working 40 hr/week in a Newborn Medicine Lab at Boston Children's Hospital and in a Pharmacology and Physiology Lab at The George Washington University, researching autism at both labs. I will be doing another six month coop at the Yale Early Social Cognition Lab at Yale University, doing research on with kids with autism. I am specifically interested in autism (as seen by my background), yet at a lot of schools there aren't professors in the clinical psychology program doing autism research. I'm wondering if its absolutely necessary that I do my PhD with a professor doing autism research? Or should I only be applying to programs with professors doing autism research? Also based on my research background/gpa, how can I figure out what schools to apply to? A lot of schools don't put gpa info on their websites it seems (and I understand because its a holistic process), but how can I know where I am in the range of applying to? Thanks!
  5. Hello everyone. I am an international student who wishes to apply to graduate chemistry programs in the US but, I'm not sure which ones or which level, MS or PhD. I know that in sciences it is uncommon to get a Master's before a PhD but, in my case, I believe it is important (correct me if I'm wrong, that's exactly why I'm here). I believe I should get a Master's, because PhD programs' requirements are very high in many cases. To be accepted to a PhD I should demonstrate a very high English level, since I'm not a native speaker. Plus, I would be required to take the GRE (and of course do well in it). Taking the GRE is a problem since I'm not studying chemistry in English, and the test will evaluate my knowledge of chemistry in English. So it will represent a tougher challenge that usual. I want to get a Master's first so I can learn a lot of chem in English (to do well in a GRE) and I feel I'd be more prepared as I would already know what it is like to be a graduate student, and I would get more research experience. I have read (never seen) of programs that combine the Master's and PhD. So your first get a Master's and then you continue with your PhD in the same university. Does anyone know about good universities in the US that offer this kind of programs? Would you recommend it (why/why not)? I think this kind of programs sound interesting as, if accepted, I would not need to worry about applying to a PhD later. Thank you in advance, I appreciate any comment and suggestions in regards to my situation.
  6. University of Toronto, checking in! Thought I'd start a thread incase anyone else is out there in the void...
  7. Hi Everyone, I'm brand new to this fourm but I read a couple questions on here and figured this might be the place for me to process my options. I am currently working on a college campus in New England at a Rape Crisis Center as a Prevention Educator/Advocate and also getting my MPH. I've a lot of work experience with them and while did my undergraduate kind of recently I will be done my MPH this time next year. I feel like currently my interests are really wide and I could see myself doing a lot but which is great, but also stressful. In thinking about my current job I love working with the victims I see often in a 1 on 1 setting and I also love facilitating larger trainings and implementing prevention on a large scale, hence the MPH. I do a lot of training and guest lectures for undergrad/graduate classes and could see eventually sitting in academia but don't know if that is the most immediate goal but would like whatever I do to have that as an option eventually. I really enjoy my MPH program and it feels like it was the right choice as what i'm learning is directly applicable to the prevention work I do every day. This leads me to my first option which is a PhD or a DrPH. In general I like the idea of a DrPH more because of its focus on practitioners and less on research however I don't love that pretty much none of them are funded. Also I like the idea of teaching during the program and that's more likely to be in a PhD program... and those are generally funded. However, research is more the focus which is fine but not totally what I'm about. Lastly the thing I am comparing public health to is a clinical psychology PhD or PsyD. I know this may feel like super out of left field but I work a lot with these folks at the University I work and love the work they do. Same dilemma with the PhD and PsyD around practice vs research and the funding in all my investigation of the programs. So I guess I am reaching out to see if someone has information on a program i haven't research that I would be interested in? I have plenty of time to narrow my options down and decide and if I were to do a public health option I likely would work more after my MPH before jumping in whereas a psychology one I would one to move into it more quickly after my MPH. Lastly I love working on a campus and could see myself in student health promotion or counseling so some kind of higher education option I wouldn't hate browsing either. An option/next step i'm thinking about is interviewing my friends that did these specific programs and ask what they liked/disliked so that's on a to do list I've started.Any guidance you all have is helpful--I know this was super rambling but I'm struggling to narrow down into as it feels like a super big decision and there are just so many options. Thanks!
  8. I'm new to this site so please forgive any breach in protocol. I am currently a math and physics double major at my undergrad institution, which has a small grad program, but I am not particularly interested in attending there. I plan on applying to phd programs in statistics, despite no research in mathematics, although I do have research experience in physics. I also was not able to take any graduate courses because of the double major. I have yet to take my GRE's, though I expect decent scores on general, and I am not sure whether I will take the subject. My gpa is a 3.88, a little higher for math, a little lower for physics. My letters should be really good, although none will come from statistics professors. My question is, is this an issue? Also, what schools would be attainable given the information provided, how many schools to apply to (ie; safety, target, reach). Thank you.
  9. How do I find out about programs? and what they consist of? My question I've had since 10th grade is why do Republicans and Democrats think differently? ~How can one group of liberals ignore science when it comes to vaccines and critique conservatives for the whole climate change is a myth thing. ~How do these seemingly-neat categories come to be, ~What holds them together, ~How can we educate ourselves to stay as true to ourselves without falling for fallacies that effect the lives of SO many people outside of ourselves. Here's what i'm working with: Sociological honors research project on church member's (of a single church) beliefs 3.774 gpa after transfer at UCLA 3.8-3.9 at SMC (I had one F that I retook) readings, and hundred of hours of podcasts on the subjects of interest listened to 2 years ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) experience working with an autism spectrum population Here are my worries: I did my undergrad in Gender Studies and Sociology I'm missing basic psych classes I have not done research in 2 years I don't have a decent writing sample Haven't touched the GRE yet Advice? tips? Who can I talk to? Which schools should I be looking at? ~ Georgiy P.S. I would love a program that includes the core ABA classes, so I can do them the first two years getting a Master's and continue on with a PhD transferring the classes as part of the same program. Does this even exist?
  10. Hi guys! So, I am starting my first year as a PhD student this fall! So, so excited Initially, I was planning to apply for TA positions because, well... I thought that was what most PhD students do their first few years! However, my professor has strongly encouraged me to NOT apply on my first year, since I will be doing my proposal, taking classes, etc... He recommended that I wait a year, as I would get more opportunities later. Is this true? I really don't want to miss out on TA experiences and so I thought I might ask here! Do PhD students usually not become TAs on their first year? Thanks!
  11. After a long wait and lots of mails I got an admit at TU Delft (MSc Electrical - Microelectronics) without any scholarships. Since this is the only admit I have(till now and I feel the only one I will have), I am in a fix. It will cost me a fortune to study there, albeit lesser than what I was expecting at US. But as per my calculations it will take me atleast 3 years to repay the loans IF I get a (good) job after graduation. My original plan was to go for PhD right after the MSc. But PhD pays even lesser than a job. I am in a fix now. If I look for job to repay the loan my PhD (and chances of getting into) will become slimmer. If I get into a PhD it will take me atleast 5 years to repay the loan (even if my parents help me partially). Is it really worth all the pain? And I won't be able to enjoy until I have repaid every single penny. Is it really worth all the pain and misery?
  12. Undergrad Institution: China Top 10 Major(s): Mathematical Finance Minor(s): Mathematics GPA: 3.79/4.0 Type of Student: International Male mathematical analysis 1-3 (A, A+, A), linear algebra 1-2 (B, A+), abstract algebra (A+), probability theory (A+), stochastic process (A+), mathematical statistics (A), Econometrics (A+) real analysis (B-), numerical analysis & complex analysis & functional analysis & topology & time series & game theory (all A+) GRE General Test: 326 Q: 168 (95%) V: 158 (80%) W: 3.0 (17%) GRE Subject Test in Mathematics: M: 840 (87%) (I will take it again in Sep.) TOEFL Score: 103/120 (taken in Nov, 2015) Grad Institution: Top 10 in USNews and Top 10 in Statistics Concentration: Applied Math GPA: 3.72 analysis (B) numerical linear algebra (B+) probability (A) stochastic process (A) linear model (A) computational learning theory (A) Programs Applying: Statistics and Machine learning Research Experience: RA with a computational neuroscience professor; RA with a biostatistics professor Awards/Honors/Recognitions: Meritorious winner in 2015 Mathematical Contest of Modeling; Scholarship in undergraduate Pertinent Activities or Jobs: TA for Calculus with probability and matrices Letters of Recommendation: one from a well-known professor who taught me two stat phd courses; two from relatively less well-known professors for whom I am RA. Any Miscellaneous Points that Might Help: Applying to Where: UPenn-stat Chicago-stat Washington-stat Columbia-stat Cornell-stat Michigan-stat Northwestern-stat Wisconsin-stat UNC-stat Cambridge-machine learning Oxford-stat UCL gatsby-computational neuroscience & machine learning I know that I am too optimistic about my profile. The truth is that I will go to work if none of them admit me. Should I retake GRE general or TOEFL? Thanks everyone for your time and patience and suggestions
  13. Hi all, I recently graduated from a Clinical Mental Health Counseling Masters program in the US and am interested in applying for PhD programs. This past year I mostly applied to Canadian clinical and counseling psychology programs, however, was rejected from them all. I am thinking about applying to more programs in the US this upcoming December but am having a tough time with deciding whether or not a PhD in Counselor Education would be a good fit for me as someone who wants to return to Canada to work afterwards. I am specifically interested in returning to Alberta where you only need a Masters to register as a psychologist. In the future I would like to work with clients and also have the opportunity to teach on a postsecondary level which is primarily why I am applying for PhD programs. I also have a Bachelor's in Psychology if that helps. I am aware that a PhD in Counselor Education would be especially helpful if I wanted to teach Masters level students in CACREP accredited schools in the US and that CACREP doesn't exist in Canada. Any comments or thoughts would be so helpful. Thanks!
  14. I have a decision to make between two schools for a PhD program in a humanities field. The first school, School A, has an advisor who I've worked with extensively and am confident in his abilities, commitment, etc. We have a great working relationship and he's mentored me through virtually all of my career. He even is recently coming off of a Fulbright Scholar assignment. I was able to secure a fellowship through this school that would give funding through summers as well as fall and spring semesters. The downside is that the school is lesser-known, and thus could be perceived as lesser. They would also presumably have fewer resources due to their "ranking" and size. The city that it's located in isn't that great, but it is affordable. School B is more well known. It's not Top 10 well known but it's bigger, higher "ranked" than School A, and would likely have more resources. I base this off of my time doing my Masters where I attended a large well known school. I've been assigned two advisors who seem reputable, but I've been down the road with my Masters where the professors at larger schools don't have time for students. Is this different for a PhD student/program? Or was this a more school-specific scenario? School B is in a very popular city (read: expensive) that I would love. They're offered me an assistantship (plus healthcare, which is a pretty substantial savings) but summer funding is not guaranteed. So the funding provided by School B essentially comes out to the same amount as School A, but in a location where the cost of living is more than double. At either school, on paper, the advisors should provide me with the knowledge and background I need. Am I off base in thinking that, after the first two years of courses, I could travel while working on my dissertation? If this is the case, School A might actually provide me more opportunities simply due to the fellowship and cost of living. Is this possible? Does a "fellowship" look that much better on a CV? I'm looking for any insight, experience, opinions... much appreciated in advance!
  15. I've narrowed down my final two choices for a PhD beginning Fall '17 to Johns Hopkins University's Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (School of Engineering) and Brown University's Department of Biostatistics (School of Public Health). I've been accepted at both. I'm interested in applied statistics (I have work experience in data science and an M.S. already), so biostatistics sounds like a natural fit. I'm curious about the reputation of the Brown program. It seems small but mighty! My concern is that by going to Brown, I'm throwing away the opportunity to rub shoulders with JHU Biostatistics (they rejected me), but I suspect it's better to like the department you're in rather than the department you're near. I haven't heard much about JHU AMS. Thanks in advance for your $0.02.
  16. Type of Undergrad: Top 5 Chinese university with top 2 econ&poli sci departments in the countryMajor: EconomicsUndergrad GPA: 3.51Type of Grad: Top 2 IR programs in the US, strong econ focusGrad GPA: 3.83GRE: 169 V, 167 Q, 4.5 WAny Special Courses: Grad-level - Econometrics, Applied Econometrics (Cross-Sectional), Advanced International Macroeconomics, and a series of China studies coursesLikely Letters of Recommendation: One from program advisor (a highly renowned, though policy-oriented China expert, whom I worked with as an RA for one year); one from another professor in China field (got an A and impressed her with the final paper); one from undergraduate econ professor (co-authored two econ papers)Research Experience: One year RA in China studies as metioned above; three published dissertations in Chinese journals (one pure econ, one political economy, one political theory)Research Interests: Comparative, Chinese politics, Methodology Quantitative Skills: STATA, SPSS, planning to learn R before application Other: Currently working in China to fulfill a two-year home residency requirement stipulated by the scholarship I received for graduate studies (working in the financial industry, completely irrelavent to poli sci); will have two-year full-time work experience plus several professional internships presented on CV by 18Fall My main concerns: 1. Professional rather than truly academic training at grad school, as well as several years of work experience in non-academic/politics areas: will these hurt my chances and should I use a full section in SOP to stress on the explanation? 2. Writing sample: choose between several course papers during graduate years (better polished and formatted, but few quant method applied) and the undergraduate thesis (published, with basic econometric analysis, but the methodology could be somewhat flawed if it was subjected to greater scrutiny) Any thoughts/comments/advice would be much appreciated!
  17. Hi everyone! I am new here so serious help will be greatly appreciated. I am graduating next year with my Bachelor's degree in Applied Mathematics and I was wondering what is the next best step for me to do. I am determined to get into grad school but I've heard that, for applied math, you have the option to either take a master's or go directly to getting a PhD. My ultimate goal is to get a PhD but getting a master's was what I was expecting to get first. Either way, I just wanted to know what most of you suggest I take: master's or directly get into PhD program? Also, what is the best school that offers a great graduate programs on Applied Math? As of right now, I don't have a specific concentration so a general best school will be fine. Thank you in advance, everyone!!! Have a great day!
  18. Hii, I am a post graduate (Masters) student of Economics in India and I ended my coursework this summer (summer 2017) from University of Hyderabad after completing my Graduation in Economics from University of Delhi. I have been interested in applying to schools in the US and Europe for Research Masters or PhD program for over a year now. I gave my general GRE and scored - 160/170 (85th percentile) in Verbal and 163/170(88th percentile) in Quantitative with an AWA score of 3.5. I have a TOEFL score of 116/120 I have completed two summer internships previously and have a job offer(without an enforceable employment bond) from HSBC for a business analyst. My CGPA has been 9/10 for MA program and I got a 73.4% during my B.A Hons in Economics. I applied to 2 colleges (John Hopkins and Tinbergen Institute) in 2017 and was rejected, but I guess this was more because I was applying during rolling admissions period than due to any problems with my application. I was not very confident about my chances in fall 2017 because of delay in applying and because I was not very clearly articulating my research ideas. I am now deciding to apply for fall 2018 for which majority of colleges will have their application windows starting from October, Nov 2017. So I will start applying this year but here is the issue - I am willing to take up the job offer and work for at least 6 months, ie. July 2017 to January 2018 and after talking to a few profs, they have agreed to help me out with recommendation letters. I do not know if it is a smart decision to work for 6 months before applying for a PhD and if with the qualifications I have, a good college will take me in. I am trying meanwhile to work on my area of interest, reading books and writing blogs before I have to join HSBC in july. I do not know if this gap of 6 months is going to be useful for my academic career and I need some assistance on how to strengthen my chances of getting into a PhD program (exams such as GRE Advanced Maths etc). I have outlined a few of my interests namely, Labour Economics, Cultural Economics, New institutional economics. I am not aiming for top 10 schools and would rather want to enroll into a heterodox school in economics. Any help and suggestions on this matter will be valued at margin :p. Thank you !
  19. Hii, I am a post graduate (Masters) student of Economics in India and I ended my coursework this summer (summer 2017) from University of Hyderabad after completing my Graduation in Economics from University of Delhi. I have been interested in applying to schools in the US and Europe for Research Masters or PhD program for over a year now. I gave my general GRE and scored - 160/170 (85th percentile) in Verbal and 163/170(88th percentile) in Quantitative with an AWA score of 3.5. I have a TOEFL score of 116/120 I have completed two summer internships previously and have a job offer(without an enforceable employment bond) from HSBC for a business analyst. My CGPA has been 9/10 for MA program and I got a 73.4% during my B.A Hons in Economics. I applied to 2 colleges (John Hopkins and Tinbergen Institute) in 2017 and was rejected, but I guess this was more because I was applying during rolling admissions period than due to any problems with my application. I was not very confident about my chances in fall 2017 because of delay in applying and because I was not very clearly articulating my research ideas. I am now deciding to apply for fall 2018 for which majority of colleges will have their application windows starting from October, Nov 2017. So I will start applying this year but here is the issue - I am willing to take up the job offer and work for at least 6 months, ie. July 2017 to January 2018 and after talking to a few profs, they have agreed to help me out with recommendation letters. I do not know if it is a smart decision to work for 6 months before applying for a PhD and if with the qualifications I have, a good college will take me in. I am trying meanwhile to work on my area of interest, reading books and writing blogs before I have to join HSBC in july. I do not know if this gap of 6 months is going to be useful for my academic career and I need some assistance on how to strengthen my chances of getting into a PhD program (exams such as GRE Advanced Maths etc). I have outlined a few of my interests namely, Labour Economics, Cultural Economics, New institutional economics. I am not aiming for top 10 schools and would rather want to enroll into a heterodox school in economics. Any help and suggestions on this matter will be valued at margin :p. Thank you !
  20. Hi All, Lets start the profiles for Fall 2017 Bioengineering/Biomedical engineering programs: Here's a template borrowed from previous years: _________________________________________ Undergrad Institution: Major(s): Minor(s): GPA in Major: x.xx/4.00 Overall GPA: x.xx/4.00 Demographics/Background: GRE Scores: Q: xxx (xx%) V: xxx (xx%) W: x.x (xx%) LOR: Research Experience: Publications/Abstracts/Presentations: Awards/Honors/Recognitions: Fellowships/Funding: Pertinent Activities or Jobs: Other Miscellaneous Accomplishments: Research Interests: Institutions/Programs: Comments:
  21. Like most PhD students, I am having a difficult time with my qualifying exams and would like some recommendations on how to proceed from others who may have experienced something similar. I should start out by explaining that I started my program as a Master’s student at the suggestion of my advisor. I didn’t come from a great undergraduate program that actually had research options and my only prior experience with research was during my year off working with a previous graduate of my advisor. During my third semester, I petitioned for a switch that my advisor was enthusiastic about and transferred to the PhD program. I was also informed recently that I received the NSF graduate research fellowship award, meaning that I won’t have to be supported with teaching/research assistantships any longer. All students are expected to complete a prospectus which entails writing a research proposal about planned research and then presenting that proposal in front of the graduate committee. I did this during my second semester as a Master’s student and again in my fourth semester after my switch in programs took effect. Also during the fourth or fifth semester, PhD students take the qualifying exams. This requires five written exams over the course of one week, each from a committee member which assigns you a topic - usually related to their field of research, not yours. If you pass this, you are able to move on to the oral exam where they ask you additional questions with all members present and this may be related to previous topics or from any topic in biology. The topics I was assigned: general ecology, comparative physiology, flight biomechanics, mammalian auditory systems and auditory processing, and mammalian and insect visual systems. I was given eight weeks to work through a mountain of textbooks and papers that were recommended, in addition to resources I found myself. Needless to say, I haven’t slept properly due to all the stress and have been remarkably unproductive in every other aspect (which is extremely unlike me). I passed the written exams with little problem. They weren’t spectacular, but no exam I’ve ever taken (SAT, GRE, midterms, finals, etc…) has ever been great just due to the anxiety from all the pressure. For my oral exam, however, I was asked the first question and I just broke. Ultimately, I ran out of the room in tears right before an extreme panic attack, unable to even tell my committee members what was happening to me. The stress, the anxiety, were things that I tried to keep unnoticed because I don’t want to be perceived as weak, or that student who can’t handle the pressure. Since that incident, I’ve talked with my members and admitted to struggling with these things. To say that I’ve always struggled with tests and public speaking is an understatement. But it’s something I’ve been actively working (including counseling and medications) on since beginning undergrad and have focused especially on this past semester knowing I would have to do this. Despite all the work and preparation, I couldn’t do it and I don’t know if I actually ever will. My committee members tell me that it shouldn’t be any different than any other time I have to speak. I disagree. When preparing for a conference or a lecture or even a job interview, you are generally narrowly focused on one topic that you’ve had the opportunity to rehearse and practice (not to mention no one at a conference tells you that you can’t come back if your talk isn’t good). This is very different from walking into a room with five people who could ask you literally anything. The goal of these exams is to confirm that PhD students are broadly trained in biology, despite specializing in a particular field and to ensure that they are truly qualified to do research. I get it, but I also think I’ve managed to demonstrate these things in other ways. I’ve done a lot of coursework because Master’s students are required to have a certain number in addition to research, which is not a requirement for PhD students. I’ve taught science courses at my university and another university prior to entering the program, I’ve passed the written portion, and I’ve managed to get an NSF grant. All my members say to me that they know I’m prepared, that I know the answers, but they still insist on me going through this ordeal to continue. I am exhausted, humiliated, and frustrated to say the least. So, has anyone else had these experiences? Were you offered any sort of alternative way to prove you’re competent? Or am I really going to have to just accept that this shortcoming is going to alter my life plans despite being very capable in every other requirement? Am I really just not good enough? Is this really the best way for the Deptartment of Academics to separate the proverbial wheat from the chaff or is my career as a biologist being held hostage behind faculty traditions passed on as normal?
  22. Hey guys, I'm deciding on what kind of programs I should I apply to this fall (to start Fall 2018) and would like some input on my plan. I've reached out to two PIs from undergrad and they both had different suggestions. Areas of research I am looking into are physical. inorganic, and materials chemistry. PI #1 (from my home institution): apply to funded master's chemistry programs (very limited but include schools such as western Washington, San Francisco State to name a couple) PI #2 (from my REU): apply to lower tier PhD programs. Little bit about me/ my situation: I graduated May 2016 with an overall GPA of 2.67 and a major GPA of 2.81 from a religious/liberal arts school . I had a very difficult freshman and sophomore year due to personal issues resulting in a super low GPA that I was never able to recover from (~2.4 average both years). I was able to raise my GPA Junior year (fall: 2.6, spring 3.2) but the fall of my senior year it tanked to a 2.5 due to mental health issues. I was given the option to take a medical leave of absence that semester but I decided against it due to my relationship with my mother at that time (I could not go back home with her for that year). Spring my GPA went back up to a 3.46. Overall, I did much better in my upper division classes than my lower division classes, but not enough to help me. Undergrad was a shit show for me due to financial issues/lack of family support all affecting my mental health. (I'm a minority female, low income background, first generation going to college. Parents did not really understand but tried to and eventually got the hang of it my senior year) I did research for 5 semesters in undergrad: Spring 2014: Computational/biochemistry lab. Realized I hated working with modeled proteins so I looked around for another lab. Fall 2014 - Spring 2016: Inorganic lab. Presented at ACS with my lab partner on the work we did. PI#1 said that there should be enough data produced to be able to get a paper out of it and he said he would work on it but haven't heard any updates since meeting with him in January. Also, I received a grant to continue working over the summer of 2015 in this lab, but I turned down the offer and accepted an NSF REU. Summer 2015: NSF REU at UConn, materials/physical chem related computational lab. Presented that work at ACS as well. (PI#2) I still keep in touch with him as well to give him updates on my plans and next steps. Both PIs that I worked with have expressed to me that they will write strong letters of recommendation for me. Overall, I have a decent amount of research with the possibility of 1 publication (not getting my hopes up for it though). I currently have an industry job not related chemistry but a instrumentation/technical role working with engineers, assay research, and data analytics to qualify the company's instruments. I enjoy the work and my manager has also expressed that he will write me a good letter of recommendation but since it isn't chemistry related, I am worried that it will affect me negatively. Also, I will be moving across the country in November and I'm worried that my manager/the company will take this the wrong way and not write me a letter... Note: I have not taken the GRE or cGRE, currently studying for them and will take them in September and October. Should I put off applying this upcoming cycle? Should I focus on only Master's programs this fall? Should I include maybe one or two PhD programs in the mix? Any tips for not accidentally burning bridges with my manager once I move? Will my current job affect me negatively? Will the move affect me negatively? I know that I am not a strong candidate for top PhD programs but I feel like I have chance for Master's programs, which will ultimately help me in achieving my dream of attending top PhD schools (looking at you Northwestern). Any input helps. thanks! *edited for grammar
  23. I decided between 2 PhD programs on April 15. Hardest decision of my life. The choice was between a prestigious program where I could continue working with an amazing advisor who I love, but not many others in the program showed interest in working with me; or I could move cross country to another prestigious program where my advisor seems like they will be amazing and everyone in the department really wanted to have me there and work with me, and many more professional opportunities are available there. I chose the one located across the country. In the end I think both were great choices, just very different ones. My issue is that I am just so, so sad to leave, despite the new opportunities that seem great at the place I chose. Did I make the right decision if I am this sad about it? I love the city I live in now, have built a community here and my advisor has been so great to me. The school across the country is in a totally new place that I only visited once and now I am having fears, i.e. what if my new advisor isn't as great as they seemed? what if I hate the new city? what if they were dishonest about the number/quality of professional opportunities? etc. I know I probably can't go back on this decision as it would alienate key people in my field. Any words of wisdom or advice would be greatly appreciated.
  24. Greetings, fellow TheGradCafe-dwellers! I will be applying to doctoral programs as an international student this year, for Fall'18. I have a Bachelors in Biotechnology from India and a Masters in Biotechnology from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering. While at Penn, I gathered a semester's worth of lab experience in an epigenetics lab and an organ-on-a-chip lab each. I also went through a summer internship at the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) during which I worked with CRISPR and TALEN gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and I later joined NYSCF after Penn as a Research Associate II to work with iPSCs to study demyelination in multiple sclerosis. I will have had two years' worth of research experience at NYSCF when I start a program in Fall'18. Through my education and lab experience, I have become interested in the use of stem cells to study human disease, specifically those involving the brain, and also possibly using tissue engineering in the whole scenario. More recently, I have thought about taking a crash course in Python so I can consider studying neural networks as well. Even though the use of stem cells + tissue engineering to study the brain is a very narrow niche, it makes it difficult to choose a suitable doctoral program- BMS/ Neurobiology/ Tissue Engineering ? I am currently eyeing schools on both coasts, over California, New York, Boston, DC, Philly and Chicago. It would be great if current students/ veterans in any of the fields could help me out by pointing me towards some good programs with relevant coursework and a collaborative research environment. Thank you!! Tanya
  25. Hi, I just finished my junior year at a mid-tier school in the US, and I am beginning to look into chemical-materials engineering PhD programs. I'm at a bit of a loss as to what type of schools I should apply to. For reference, here are my stats: GPA: 3.96/4 Research Experience: 2.5 years by the time I am finished with my undergrad Publications: A couple in the works right now, likely to have one published and another one (first author) being submitted by the time I start applying GRE: Haven't taken yet, studying for it right now LoR: Can likely get three good ones, one from my PI and others from two professors I know well I'm also an American if that matters As I said, I am unsure of which schools I should look into. I clearly want to go to the best programs possible, but I also don't want to be the person who only applies to the top 10 schools and is crushed when I get no acceptances. Is there a "strategy" I should use when looking at schools? Should I even bother applying to schools like Berkeley and MIT? My main concern is even though I have a high GPA and decent research experience, my school isn't very well-known for engineering. I'm sure you all understand how confusing this whole process can be, so I appreciate any advice. Thank you.