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Found 32 results

  1. Yo everyone - hope you're all well, So I'm looking into getting a dual MIA-MBA degree. I basically want to get involved in international business strategy - Evaluating foreign markets, expansion, best approaches, etc. And I'm thinking that a dual MIA-MBA would be perfect. Despite the massive debt, I'd be a unique candidate - the MBA would give me solid business acumen while the MIA would help me hone my language skills and solidify my theoretical knowledge of the world economy. Now I've only got a couple years of work experience, which is a little on the low side for bschool , but given the 3 year timeline I feel like I should go for it sooner than later. I've looked at a bunch of MBA programs and I've been looking at a lot of the top MIA programs (Gtown, SAIS, HKS, Princeton, SIPA, etc.). Anyway, there is some flexibility in my plan and I'm basically wondering the following: Should I apply to both MBA and MIA programs (At Colombia, Gtown, SAIS/Tuck, Texas, etc) now or, Should I apply to MIA now (less competitive admissions process), then when I'm one year in, apply to the bschool. Anyone know if this has worked for people? Would you have a better shot of getting in given that you're already enrolled at the university? I like the idea of breaking up the application process, plus even if I didn't get in to the MBA program, it would always be an option to do the two-year MIA and then a one-year MBA afterwards too. I'm also happy to hear any thoughts/insights on my plan,the MIA in general, the MBA,or the schools I mentioned. Thanks!
  2. Hey guys, I cannot seem to decide which Masters would be best suited to me. About me :- An Economics Graduate of LUMS (Lahore University of Management Sciences), Lahore, Pakistan. GPA :- 3.2 Work Experience :- 11 Months so far Job :- External Consultant to University of Oxford. Past Experience :- Finance Intern at Standard Chartered Bank Pakistan Head office and Analyst at Federal Ministry of Planning, Development and Reform (Worked directly under the Federal Minister of Planning and Development) - placed via USAID. Currently working on an IPA (Innovations for poverty actions) funded joint project of University of Oxford and LUMS. The supervisor being Simon Quinn and Meki, Associate Professor at Oxford and PhD candidate at Oxford respectively. It is an RCT designed to test the new financial product. Interests :- *Primarily Interested in International Economics, Business, Geopolitics, Mega-Infrastructure Projects and to some extent Philosophy.*I *Ideal career as envisioned :- In 10 years, the ideal version of me should be travelling around the globe advising the Governments of China, Kenya and Ukraine to set up Special Economic Zones in Urumqi, build a railway network to increase Intra-regional connectivity, set up a trade policy and formulate or lead development of industrial estates in Eastern Ukraine to neutralize the secessionist movements. *At the same time, I would want to work on projects such as formulating a comprehensive strategy for AirAsia’s Expansion into the Brazilian Market, Design the route of Shell’s oil and gas pipeline in Kazakhstan from its oil/gas fields to the port of Aktau on the Caspian. *Despite the average GPA (mainly due to mathematics courses, I have always topped every group project and did most of the work/took initiative) *Marketing Models – Most of the work was done by me and ! Got the highest in project (Demand Forecasting using Marketing Engineering for Excel), same goes with Principles of Finance (Indus Motor’s expansion), Intermediate Finance ( Pakistan Shipping Corp Valuation), Options, Swaps and Derivatives (Designing of Shorting Strategies for Unilever and Air Canada) and more recently, was applauded for the best project ever by the instructor in ACF (Advanced Corporate Finance) - The merger of BG and Shell’s valuation using SPSS/Advanced Excel and STATA. The issue that I am facing is I can't seem to decide which Masters Degree will end up opening the aforementioned options for me. I have considered Fletcher's MIB but it is more inclined towards Management or Corporate Firms and Social Development rather than my interests. Have looked at SIPA/SAIS/WWS as well as but I am really not sure. Not getting the feeling that THIS IS THE ONE FOR ME ! Any insight would be highly appreciated. Thank you.
  3. I realise that early action decisions are out, but I am eagerly waiting for the March decisions. Would be good to have a space to follow the updates. So, here's a thread for SIPA!
  4. Hello everyone, I was recently admitted to Columbia University's SIPA program for the Masters in Public Administration in Development Practice with a $35,000 scholarship to cover both years. Their tuition is about $108,000 for both years which would leave me to come up with about $70,000 on my own. However I would have to worry about housing since I can live with my grandparents in Newark NJ and just commute. However I just received an email from the Dean of Emory for the Development practice program stating that the school is willing to give me a $50,000 scholarship spanning both years which would only leave me $30,000 to come up on my own. However, I would have to find housing in Atlanta. Columbia has more classes suited to my particular interests in green building and sustainable cities. However, Emory is also a great program and they offer 2 field practicums. In your opinion would you take the scholarship to Emory or would you take the offer to Columbia which has more classes suited to my interests?
  5. I have a little over a week to make a decision! I've been accepted to 3 US programs with around the same scholarship (50%), same cost for tuition. UDenver's MA in International Development, Heller's MA in Sustainable International Development, and Emory's Masters of Development Practice. I've also been accepted to IHEID (the graduate institute in Geneva) for Development Studies and a dual program between Sciences Po and Columbia's SIPA for International Affairs. These will be comparable costs. I'm essentially still considering Korbel, Emory, and Sciences Po/SIPA, and they are radically different. Any suggestions would be great! Korbel-- Pros-- as a top IR program, good networking, top research, exchange program with the graduate institute in Geneva so that I could network there and intern, DENVER. Cons-- no field work opportunities Emory-- pros-- new MDP program that hits all the quantitative and qualitative skills I want to learn for program management and research, small cohort 15 people, summer internships with international NGOs included in program (travel, Per dieu, etc), more critical philosophy of development. Cons-- not an IR renowned university, lack of networking opportunities Sciences Po/Columbia SIPA-- Paris and NY, French and networking advantages, both top IR programs in the world, focus on econ/politics, sciences po excellent African studies classes, can understand Jeff Sachs development to hopefully critique later. Cons-- mainstream development, cohorts that are only interested in moving up with UN/WHO instead of critical development theory I would ideally like to be a program manager for an international NGO, but also have significant data analysis skills to do research in the future for public policy and maybe a PhD. I'm going back and forth every day-- any thoughts from students in a similar position or in the development field would be so helpful!
  6. Hi everyone! I've recently received admissions notifications for grad school and decided to turn to The Grad Cafe for help and/or input in deciding which school I should attend. Hopefully i get some feedback soon, considering the deadline is on April 15! Anyway, a little background on myself. I am a 23 year old female person from Malaysia. Got my Bachelor's in International Relations from Boston University (Class of 2015) and am currently working as a researcher at a foreign policy think tank in my country. Hoping to go back to grad school this Fall 2017. I applied to all IR MA programs, 6 in total, and all 6 accepted me. The 6 schools and programs are: Columbia SIPA (MIA) Johns Hopkins SAIS (MA) University of Denver Josef Korbel School (MA in Intl Human Rights) George Washington Elliott School (MA in Global Communication) UT Austin LBJ School (MGPS) Tufts Fletcher (MALD) I honestly did not expect to get into all 6 programs, which is why I am having trouble deciding. I've created an Excel spreadsheet to look over all the relevant details in order to help me make the best choice but what do you guys think are the programs I should give more weight to? All of the programs i've applied to are of the international human rights/humanitarian policy with a global communications/public service/policy orientation. I like these programs because they are all interdisciplinary and most emphasize on practical applications of knowledge rather than theoretical. For example, rather than complete an MA thesis, some of these programs require Capstones or practical internships instead. My weaknesses are economics and numbers. Some of these schools have also offered me scholarships/fellowships - the only two who haven't are SIPA and SAIS. What i'm taking into consideration when picking schools/programs are mainly cost of attendance, scholarship/fellowship offered, reputation/ranking and cost of living (since i'm guessing i'd most probably have to live off campus, self housing). Prior to receiving admissions notices, I had my own personal choice ranking but now, some of it has shifted. For example, NYC cost of living alone is a number that i am not sure I would be able to afford (let alone cost of attendance of 80k per year) so Columbia has moved down slightly on my list. I am going to apply to government scholarships from my country that would cover cost of living etc, everything total but the problem is i have to make a commitment to a school soon and scholarships here generally have 3-4 rounds of interviews so it might not work out in my favor soon enough. That's pretty much the basic gist of it! Looking forward to any and all input, opinions, first hand knowledge and experiences that you guys can offer!
  7. I got into both the Hertie School of Governance (MIA & MPP) and SIPA MPA. The schools have a duel degree program but you are supposed to apply to the second school as an enrolled first year at the first institution. The school exchange goes both ways. Does anyone know if you can be simultaneously admitted into the full duel degree to begin with? Nothing on the website talks about this, but I don't want to go through another set of applications now that I am already admitted to both programs.
  8. Hi everyone! I've recently received admissions notifications for grad school and decided to turn to The Grad Cafe for help and/or input in deciding which school I should attend. Hopefully i get some feedback soon, considering the deadline is on April 15! Anyway, a little background on myself. I am a 23 year old female person from Malaysia. Got my Bachelor's in International Relations from Boston University (Class of 2015) and am currently working as a researcher at a foreign policy think tank in my country. Hoping to go back to grad school this Fall 2017. I applied to all IR MA programs, 6 in total, and all 6 accepted me. The 6 schools and programs are: Columbia SIPA (MIA) Johns Hopkins SAIS (MA) University of Denver Josef Korbel School (MA in Intl Human Rights) George Washington Elliott School (MA in Global Communication) UT Austin LBJ School (MGPS) Tufts Fletcher (MALD) I honestly did not expect to get into all 6 programs, which is why I am having trouble deciding. I've created an Excel spreadsheet to look over all the relevant details in order to help me make the best choice but what do you guys think are the programs I should give more weight to? All of the programs i've applied to are of the international human rights/humanitarian policy with a global communications/public service/policy orientation. I like these programs because they are all interdisciplinary and most emphasize on practical applications of knowledge rather than theoretical. For example, rather than complete an MA thesis, some of these programs require Capstones or practical internships instead. My weaknesses are economics and numbers. Some of these schools have also offered me scholarships/fellowships - the only two who haven't are SIPA and SAIS. What i'm taking into consideration when picking schools/programs are mainly cost of attendance, scholarship/fellowship offered, reputation/ranking and cost of living (since i'm guessing i'd most probably have to live off campus, self housing). Prior to receiving admissions notices, I had my own personal choice ranking but now, some of it has shifted. For example, NYC cost of living alone is a number that i am not sure I would be able to afford (let alone cost of attendance of 80k per year) so Columbia has moved down slightly on my list. I am going to apply to government scholarships from my country that would cover cost of living etc, everything total but the problem is i have to make a commitment to a school soon and scholarships here generally have 3-4 rounds of interviews so it might not work out in my favor soon enough. That's pretty much the basic gist of it! Looking forward to any and all input, opinions, first hand knowledge and experiences that you guys can offer!
  9. Hi everyone. Since today is the Early Action deadline and I haven't seen a thread for those of us who are applying to SIPA, I thought it would be good to start one here. Anyone else apply Early or looking to apply for one of the later deadlines?
  10. Hello world! Has anyone done the video response as part of SIPA's admissions package? I know it's being implemented as of 2017 application cycle, so I am wondering if there are any Spring 2017 candidates that have already done it. Helpful tips, feedback, etc. would be much appreciated!
  11. Long time lurker, first time poster - thanks for the help! I am working on cutting down my SIPA policy essay to 200 words (ugh) and realizing how much space noting my sources takes up. Do you think we can use footnotes? Would these footnotes need to be part of the word count? The example on the blog has a passage like this: "The Journal of Creativity in Mental Health reports that spending time with a therapy animal resulted in decreases in self-reported anxiety and loneliness in college students, according to the Columbia University Medical Center. While the International Journal of Stress Management reports that simply petting a dog during study breaks reduces student anxiety and sadness..." I'm curious how others approached this, especially those who just got in EA (congrats!).
  12. Hi, I will be starting 2nd year of MPA at Columbia SIPA. I'm an international student. Though I have a partial scholarship from SIPA and taken a loan for my studies, the living and course have been so expensive that I'll run out of money to finance my last semester. I have already reached out to Prodigy Finance and MPOWER for additional loan, but they have declined my application. Since I'm an international student and have no one in the US who could be a cosigner for US bank loan, that is not an option. Plus, my family can't support my studies since it's not affordable. Are there any other options I could look at? Urgent help needed here, please. Thanks in advance.
  13. Heyyyy Guys! Just got admitted to LSE MPA and SIPA'S MPA and MPA-DP. My aim is to work on international development and at global initiatives and agencies (such as UNDP, FAO, USAID,etc). None of them have offered me funding. But, from what I have heard is easier to get student loans and/or second-year funding at SIPA. But, LSE's tuiton fee is significant lowe. But I love Columbia. I am quite confused. Any advice? Anyone on the same boat. Also, I have to decide between the 2 SIPA programs.
  14. Hi Everyone, I'll most likely be attending the MPP program at Gtown's McCourt School or MPA program at Columbia SIPA. Could anyone give me some insight on the differences and similarities of the two programs/schools? For reference, I'm very interested in industrial policy, human capital development, and economic development, and I have a Bachelors in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell. Thank you!!
  15. Anyone know this year acceptance rate of HKS MPP, SIPA MPA, WWS MPA? Which school is the most selective policy school? I heard that HKS rate was around 25-30%. Has anyone attend admitted student day, how was it? I am unable to attend any. Please share your experiences. Thanks!
  16. I am spoilt for choice! Got into SIPA and HKS with a solid funding from SIPA (upwards of 50% tuition) and none from HKS. This forum seems to have something against the SIPA program but I'm just wondering is there anything that gives HKS a leg up from SIPA that would justify taking on loans?
  17. Would love to hear what the average GRE score is for Columbia's SIPA. Thanks!
  18. I was accepted into SIPA, Tufts, SAIS, SIS, and CIR. ALL of the schools have offered generous funding. SIPA offered me the most by far: over $67k in funding for the 2 years plus an International Fellowship. SAIS offered full funding for the first semester in Bologna. I'll email to ask about 2nd year funding. Tufts gave me over $40k for 2 years, SIS & CIR gave me 1/2 off tuition waiver. Any of these options would require some debt, which is fine. I'm not risk averse. I'm just trying to find the best option. I am interested in terrorism and security studies; I already speak a few languages, so language course accommodation is not a problem. I have 6+ years abroad working in public service, so I don't have to have a study abroad option. I don't really know what I want to do after school; I've thought about a PhD, working in consulting, working for the UN, Amnesty International, or a think tank. Any advise?
  19. SIPA offered me $71k in scholarships, and the tuition+fees are about $113 for the 2 years. So, I'd be on the hook for $42k. SAIS has now offered me a full ride. So, I'd have no debt. But, from what I've researched, I think that SIPA is a better fit overall. What would you do?
  20. Another one of those long-time "lurkers," first time poster. Is anyone else deciding between SIPA and SAIS, or have suggestions for the pros + cons list? Although I'm doing a Asia/South Asia concentration, I'd appreciate any insights regarding the programs as a whole. One of the things I'm most curious about is about how folks here measure the programs' prestige. Although that won't be the defining factor, I still am not completely sure how to assess the "ranking" of the programs, outside of the TRIP/FP study from last year. Thanks in advance for your help!
  21. Hey everyone, This is my first post on here so please bear with me. I'm an undergraduate student who applied for various MPP and IR programs and am having a hard time deciding where to go. I am interested in working in the international development field with an emphasis on human rights and humanitarian policy and my interests are mostly centered on working for non profit organizations straight out of graduate school. I would love to work for NGOs abroad shortly after graduating but don't know how much name recognition plays into gaining employment with NGOs in general. I would also love to work for the United Nations later on in my career but that would be further down the line. I applied to a wide range of graduate schools not really anticipating favorable responses since full time work experience seems to be a huge factor that plays into gaining admittance into these schools so was surprised when I received admittances into all of them. Right now i've narrowed down my choices to four schools and would love as much insight as possible: * The range on student loans depends on how much my parents would be able to pitch in. * I am terrified of student loans Columbia- SIPA: Pros: -Name: May be helpful gaining employment abroad? -There is a human rights/ humanitarian policy concentration -Huge alumni connection may help with employment prospects after graduation. -Ties with the U.N -Strong language programs Cons: - I would be looking at around $100,000-120,000 in student loans for both years and don't think it's worth it. I was fortunate enough to not have to take out any student loans for undergrad and have heard enough horror stories to motivate me to try and limit the amount of debt I take on for grad school. If I had received significant funds from them I would have already signed the dotted line however since I plan on working for NGO's (starting salary of around $40,000-$50,000) I don't think it makes sense to take on so much debt. JHU-SAIS: Pros: - Name recognition. -Was admitted to the International Development concentration. -DC: Good opportunities to take out work experience. -Strong language programs Cons: -From what i've read on the program, most graduates end up working for the private sector or international finance/ banking institutions which isn't necessarily what I'm interested in. -Price tag: $40,000-70,000 in student loans (without living expenses). -Will have to live at home to save on living expenses. I love my family but I don't know if I will be able to handle living back at home after graduating. George Washington: Elliott: Pros: - Is cheaper then Columbia and SAIS and received $16,000 in funding for both years. - In DC (work/ internship opportunities). -Evening classes which would help me work/ intern during the day. - Strong study abroad programs (Although I don't know if I will be able to take advantage of this). -Strong language programs -Employment statistics seem to indicate that a fairly large number of graduates go on to work for NGOs Cons: - $14,000-$44,000 in student loans - Will have to live at home. - Is it crazy to reject the other two schools for GW (which is still a very good school in my opinion). University of Maryland (SPP) Pros: - Half graduate assistantship and guaranteed research or TA position. - No student loans. - Can finally buy a car and will not have to live with my parents. - A fairly large amount of alumni seem to move on to work for NGO's. -I really like UMD :') -Good funding opportunities for internships/ study abroad options/ people interested in working for NGOs Cons: - Does not have as much recognition as the other three schools. - The international development programs of the other schools seem to be stronger. - If I wanted to language courses I would have to take classes over the winter (which I wouldn't have to pay for because of my funding). -I'm worried that I may have a harder time finding a job here as opposed to the other school. -My father thinks i'm crazy for still considering UMD after getting into the other three schools. Any and all insight would be much appreciated. Thank you!
  22. Any advice you can give would be much appreciated! I have a very tough choice ahead of me. -Cambridge MPhil in International Relations and Politics. -Fulbright for Sciences Po Paris, with LSE the following year (dual degree). -Oxford MPhil in International Relations -Others: LSE MSc in IPE on its own (1 year), PSIA International Public Management on its own (Fulbright first year, second year much less expensive than if I did the LSE dual degree but less impressive/wouldn't open doors in London), UCL Masters in International Public Policy, SAIS Bologna/DC (offered no money), SIPA MIA (offered no money)
  23. WWJD? I got into HKS which is my absolute dream school (literally cried for joy when the email happened) for their MPP program and now I've got the tough decision of weighing with my second choice, Columbia SIPA, where I've received a generous $80,000 scholarship over two years. I would be happy and successful at either school, BUT I feel more connected to the mission, student body, and culture at HKS. Plus there is that extra boost of prestige that I don't have (as a public state school undergrad). Financial aid decisions aren't released from HKS until April, but I am finding myself having nightmares of the horror on not getting any funding. What would YOU do?
  24. Hello everyone! I was wondering if there are any PEPM (Columbia SIPA) applicants in this forum. It would be nice to share thoughts about the application process, and share together all the anxiety about the decisions of the admission committee.
  25. So I got into: Harvard KSG, Stanford IPS, John Hopkins SAIS, UCSD IR/PS, Columbia SIPA No funding with any of these schools. :'( My top choice is SAIS, Stanford, then KSG. I'm starting to worry about the enormous debt burden that I'm about to undertake. I currently have a stable job making in the mid-40ks with my BA but the job has no career advancement. My passion has always been in IR and I want to work in DC, State Department, NGOs, international development, etc. Cost of these schools: $80k for 2 years tuition + $20k for living costs... so realistically $100k in debt. It could be as low as $50-70k if I get a second year teaching assistantship. Median income upon graduation: ~$60k. I can stick with my current job and make over $60k in 5 years. Or go back to school for 2 years, get $100k in debt, and make $60k to start and potentially advance faster than with just a BA. Do you guys think it's worth it to get in that much deb? Or should I ignore the masters and try to see if I can get a career started in IR without the need for a masters?