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any suggestions for similar programs?

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Posted

I am a EE student, and I basically realized midway through my course that, well.... engineering sucks :oops: . i didnt particularly like the EE programs offered by most universities and while looking for interesting programs in physics, i found one which seems to be tailor made for me, the applied physics program at harvard. I havent yet gone through the prof profiles to see what sort of actual research comes out of harvard, but Im sure its safe to assume I would find at least some groups there which would excite me. So my liking for the program is based solely on what they would actually be teaching me during an MS ( as opposed to what I may do with all that they teach me during my Phd )

the only problem is that an admit to harvard of course, is not easy to get. So, I wanted to know if you guys could help me find a similar alternative program.

http://www.seas.harvard.edu/research/ap ... ysics.html

Check this page out. Except for the geophysics part of the program, I have harbored a serious interest in EACH AND EVERY ONE of the other topics listed there. PLease let me know if youve come across a program you think I would enjoy based on this page.

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Posted

Cornell has a great applied physics program, Columbia applied physics is also good, and you might also like Princeton's electrical engineering program.

On the whole, though, I'd take a look at materials science departments. Materials science is usually classified as "engineering," but it doesn't suck (I started out trying to double major in materials science and EE, so I say this from experience, although I'm still probably biased). Some places to get you started: MIT, Northwestern, Berkeley, Cornell, UPenn, Penn State, UIUC, UCSB, UMichigan, UT Austin... It might be easier for you to get in to a materials science program with an engineering background than it would be for you to get in to an applied physics program.

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