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French PhD Programs (Fall 2012)


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#21 papillon_pourpre

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:54 AM

I just got back from my visit with Penn last weekend and it's made my decision that much harder. I was really leaning toward NYU, but now it's all up in the air. I really liked the faculty, the grad students were awesome, and their pedagogy program is nothing short of phenomenal. I also loved Philly and since the funding for the two programs is pretty much equal, I'm thinking I would be a lot more financially comfortable than in NYC. I'm visiting NYU March 2-3. How am I supposed to choose??
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Applied: 10
Accepted: 5
Interview: 3
Rejected: 3
Withdrawals: 2

Decision: NYU, Joint PhD in French Literature and French Studies

#22 quiltedgiraffe

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 03:33 AM

Hey quiltedgiraffe. Congratulations on your Princeton acceptance. I loved Princeton, however, the experience for undergraduates differs from that of graduate students in very significant ways. Princeton is definitely more of an undergraduate-focused university, so in that sense, it was a wonderful place to go to college. I can't speak about the German department but I do know that the French department at Princeton (at the graduate level) is one of the top programs in the country. They all work really hard to finish the PhD in 5 years (whereas everywhere else people take 6 or 7 years on average). The town itself is small, chic, quite expensive and not very exciting. However NYC and Philly are each one hour away by train, so it's really not that bad. Princeton's campus is gorgeous. I miss it so much. Harvard's just doesn't come close. During the nicer months, you could definitely get a lot of reading done out and about on campus (Chancellor Green is a particularly awesome alternative to Firestone, i.e. the main library). Cloistering yourself in Firestone, especially in the underground floors, will get depressing fast, so I don't recommend it! I'd be happy to answer other questions via PM. Good luck with your decision!


Thanks, Joey. That helps. The German department at Princeton is amazing, really world-class, and that's what matters most! They're doing an open house weekend next month, which I'm really excited about.

Though it seems shockingly expensive to live in Princeton on the (admittedly very generous) stipend. Graduate housing on campus is as much as I pay in rent in NYC! Granted, I have a housemate here, but still!
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#23 Starlajane

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:50 PM

Hey! We're already starting to meet the prospective students visiting our department. It's a lot of fun reliving this whole experience albeit from "the other side." Good luck to you all during these interviews and visits. Just have a lot of fun with it all. The places that have invited you (even if it's for an "interview") really just want to court you and convince you to attend so make the most of it while it lasts! Make sure to interact with the grad students, especially, and ask them any questions you may have. We're usually pretty candid sources of information. If anyone has any questions, feel free to hit me up. Félicitations once again, everyone!


Is this really true, for all French departments? Why wouldn't they just accept a candidate that they wanted to attend?

Mind you, I am seriously hoping that you are right, b/c if I get into the school with whom I have an interview this week, I will be over the moon! Still, I'm not going to get my hopes up; I am convinced that an interview means that they can always decide that I'm a completely inept dufus who looks better on paper than in person.
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#24 Starlajane

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:11 PM

I just got back from my visit with Penn last weekend and it's made my decision that much harder. I was really leaning toward NYU, but now it's all up in the air. I really liked the faculty, the grad students were awesome, and their pedagogy program is nothing short of phenomenal. I also loved Philly and since the funding for the two programs is pretty much equal, I'm thinking I would be a lot more financially comfortable than in NYC. I'm visiting NYU March 2-3. How am I supposed to choose??


I think that you will know once you visit NYU. However, have you checked out the "Decisions, Decisions" thread as well as the "Cities" thread? You might get a lot of useful advice there...

In the end, it depends on your personality. But also remember that you will have to be living in the city in which you are getting your PhD. You want to live someplace in which you are comfortable on all levels.

If it were me, I would be torn between Berkely and UPenn; Berkeley b/c I already know (and love) it, UPenn b/c I already know (and love) it. I wouldn't even consider NYU b/c I wouldn't want to live in a very urban environment (and neither would my GSD).
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#25 papillon_pourpre

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 11:56 PM

In the end, it depends on your personality. But also remember that you will have to be living in the city in which you are getting your PhD. You want to live someplace in which you are comfortable on all levels.


I love big cities, so I think I would be comfortable in either NYC or Philadelphia. I haven't visited Berkeley yet, but I've always seen myself as more of an east coast person. Plus I love the idea of being a train ride away from D.C., Boston, and the like.

If it were me, I would be torn between Berkely and UPenn; Berkeley b/c I already know (and love) it, UPenn b/c I already know (and love) it. I wouldn't even consider NYU b/c I wouldn't want to live in a very urban environment (and neither would my GSD).


The thing about NYU is that their program is pretty much perfect for my academic interests. I got in to do the joint PhD in French literature/French studies and I'm most interested in looking at 19th (-20th) century literature, art, and culture through the perspective of political history. The joint program is about 1/2 lit and 1/2 civ and they focus almost exclusively on post-revolutionary France. Penn's program is great too, but it's more traditional, and I don't know whether that's a good or a bad thing for me. I guess I'll know better after I visit NYU...
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Applied: 10
Accepted: 5
Interview: 3
Rejected: 3
Withdrawals: 2

Decision: NYU, Joint PhD in French Literature and French Studies

#26 Starlajane

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 02:36 AM

I love big cities, so I think I would be comfortable in either NYC or Philadelphia. I haven't visited Berkeley yet, but I've always seen myself as more of an east coast person. Plus I love the idea of being a train ride away from D.C., Boston, and the like. The thing about NYU is that their program is pretty much perfect for my academic interests. I got in to do the joint PhD in French literature/French studies and I'm most interested in looking at 19th (-20th) century literature, art, and culture through the perspective of political history. The joint program is about 1/2 lit and 1/2 civ and they focus almost exclusively on post-revolutionary France. Penn's program is great too, but it's more traditional, and I don't know whether that's a good or a bad thing for me. I guess I'll know better after I visit NYU...


You've really got to visit Berkeley first; it is nothing like SoCal and San Fran is right across the bridge. And I say that being a diehard New Englander myself. Berkeley itself is suburban, though, so maybe it isn't a good fit in that regard. But I would be surprised if you didn't like it.

You will definitely know after you visit NYU. The thing that concerns me about NYC is the expense, which I think will be far greater than at UPenn. Vis-a-vis your interests, I think that most programs have that kind of focus: it's never straight up lit--culture and history are woven into every program, and a lot of programs have tracks that are divided into pre- and post-rev France (at least, UVA's program is). However, if NYU's program focuses specifically on the post-rev period, then you will definitely have more classes to choose from and more profs with whom to confer specifically about your interests. OTOH, with a more traditional program, your range may be broader, which can also prove to be an asset; I've learned a lot about nineteenth century French culture by going back to seventeenth century texts and topics and that research was not even for a French class, but a comp lit course.

But that's just me. Suffice to say, you have a tough choice ahead of you. Hope the aforementioned helps.

Edited by Starlajane, 22 February 2012 - 02:37 AM.

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#27 JoeySsance

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:45 AM

Is this really true, for all French departments? Why wouldn't they just accept a candidate that they wanted to attend?

Mind you, I am seriously hoping that you are right, b/c if I get into the school with whom I have an interview this week, I will be over the moon! Still, I'm not going to get my hopes up; I am convinced that an interview means that they can always decide that I'm a completely inept dufus who looks better on paper than in person.


Hey Starlajane. It depends on the type of "interview." If you've been "shortlisted," i.e. invited to visit the school and told that their final decision will be made after the visit, while that's not a guaranteed admission in theory, in practice, it tends to be. (The other type of interview that comes to mind usually occurs earlier in the application season and if you had one of those, it probably would have been over the phone or via Skype and sometimes even in person if you happened to live near the school) The extent to which shortlist interviews should be considered likely offers of admission depends on several factors. I was in this situation for Columbia's French/Comp Lit PhD program last year. I brought along some formal attire just in case but it ended up being exactly like every other (non-shortlist, i.e. acceptance) visit I had, i.e. chats with professors, grad students, group events. When you're shortlisted, they basically want to gauge some or all of the following: the level of enthusiasm for the department you show in person; the other offers you've received and the likeliness that you would accept or turn down their own offer; your fit on a more personal and collegial level. While technically they've already decided that you'd likely be a good fit academically and intellectually, in a good friend of mine's case (who's now in Princeton's French PhD program), she and another candidate with very similar interests to hers were both invited to the shortlist visit and it seemed like only one of the two of them would be admitted (which indeed ended up being the case). Of course each department has different needs; sometimes departments may seek more than one and perhaps even several students for the same literary period (in French lit this tends to happen very frequently for vingtièmistes and perhaps to a somewhat lesser extent for dix-neuvièmistes, though it can and does happen for all other periods) and indeed sometimes departments even have the funds to admit and subsequently support more than one person per period. The bottom line is: if it's your dream program or a program which you genuinely would like to have among your options, just show them that you're excited and don't reveal too much about your other offers. (Don't be completely silent about them either; basically, if you're asked by faculty or grad students where else you're considering, just calmly mention the other places but leave it at that. You may be asked where you're leaning and it's perfectly alright to say that you're not sure yet and that you're really hoping to keep an open mind and learn a lot more about each program during these visits) My feeling is that some schools prefer "shortlisting" over just admitting candidates outright because of administrative/funding-related constraints; i.e. they want to be sure to admit a realistic number of candidates (i.e. to account for the fact that some candidates will invariably be wooed by other places) but they also want to keep in mind that if, ideally, everyone were to accept, the program would have the funding to support all of them. Over-committing one year would likely lessen a department's funds for the subsequent year. Moreover, if departments have poor yields, the university administrations can and have taken away admission slots from them in subsequent years; these are all factors that seem to go into the decision to shortlist people. Does that somewhat answer your questions?

Here's some general advice for all of you: Enjoy these visits to the max! It might all seem a little intimidating, but just remember that these departments are all celebrating and courting you; you should feel really excited about it all! Finally, I can't stress enough the importance of seeking out opportunities to talk to the grad students on any visit. I mean we all try to get you excited about our respective departments but you'll find that, in general, we tend to be one of the more candid sources of information you'll find about the strengths and weaknesses of our own department. I hope that's helpful! Bon courage à vous toutes et à vous tous ! :lol:
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Final decision: Harvard, PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures

#28 Starlajane

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:03 PM

Hey Starlajane. It depends on the type of "interview." If you've been "shortlisted," i.e. invited to visit the school and told that their final decision will be made after the visit, while that's not a guaranteed admission in theory, in practice, it tends to be. (The other type of interview that comes to mind usually occurs earlier in the application season and if you had one of those, it probably would have been over the phone or via Skype and sometimes even in person if you happened to live near the school) The extent to which shortlist interviews should be considered likely offers of admission depends on several factors. I was in this situation for Columbia's French/Comp Lit PhD program last year. I brought along some formal attire just in case but it ended up being exactly like every other (non-shortlist, i.e. acceptance) visit I had, i.e. chats with professors, grad students, group events. When you're shortlisted, they basically want to gauge some or all of the following: the level of enthusiasm for the department you show in person; the other offers you've received and the likeliness that you would accept or turn down their own offer; your fit on a more personal and collegial level. While technically they've already decided that you'd likely be a good fit academically and intellectually, in a good friend of mine's case (who's now in Princeton's French PhD program), she and another candidate with very similar interests to hers were both invited to the shortlist visit and it seemed like only one of the two of them would be admitted (which indeed ended up being the case). Of course each department has different needs; sometimes departments may seek more than one and perhaps even several students for the same literary period (in French lit this tends to happen very frequently for vingtièmistes and perhaps to a somewhat lesser extent for dix-neuvièmistes, though it can and does happen for all other periods) and indeed sometimes departments even have the funds to admit and subsequently support more than one person per period. The bottom line is: if it's your dream program or a program which you genuinely would like to have among your options, just show them that you're excited and don't reveal too much about your other offers. (Don't be completely silent about them either; basically, if you're asked by faculty or grad students where else you're considering, just calmly mention the other places but leave it at that. You may be asked where you're leaning and it's perfectly alright to say that you're not sure yet and that you're really hoping to keep an open mind and learn a lot more about each program during these visits) My feeling is that some schools prefer "shortlisting" over just admitting candidates outright because of administrative/funding-related constraints; i.e. they want to be sure to admit a realistic number of candidates (i.e. to account for the fact that some candidates will invariably be wooed by other places) but they also want to keep in mind that if, ideally, everyone were to accept, the program would have the funding to support all of them. Over-committing one year would likely lessen a department's funds for the subsequent year. Moreover, if departments have poor yields, the university administrations can and have taken away admission slots from them in subsequent years; these are all factors that seem to go into the decision to shortlist people. Does that somewhat answer your questions?

Here's some general advice for all of you: Enjoy these visits to the max! It might all seem a little intimidating, but just remember that these departments are all celebrating and courting you; you should feel really excited about it all! Finally, I can't stress enough the importance of seeking out opportunities to talk to the grad students on any visit. I mean we all try to get you excited about our respective departments but you'll find that, in general, we tend to be one of the more candid sources of information you'll find about the strengths and weaknesses of our own department. I hope that's helpful! Bon courage à vous toutes et à vous tous ! :lol:


Thanks, Joey!
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#29 papillon_pourpre

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:44 AM

You've really got to visit Berkeley first; it is nothing like SoCal and San Fran is right across the bridge. And I say that being a diehard New Englander myself. Berkeley itself is suburban, though, so maybe it isn't a good fit in that regard. But I would be surprised if you didn't like it.


I'm visiting Berkeley later in March. I love Berkeley's program as well. I've already been in contact with my POI and she's agreed to be my mentor should I choose to go there. What worries me most about Berkeley though is that it's apart of the UC system and I'm concerned about the security of my funding throughout the program. Penn and NYU offer generous stipends that are guaranteed for 5 years, although NYC is super expensive. I'm still trying to weigh the ranking vs. fit vs. placement record question as well. The 2010 NRC rankings put both Penn and NYU above Berkeley for French and after looking at all of their placement records, I was much more impressed by Penn and NYU. Suffice it to say, a lot of my decision will depend on how I feel after having visited all three programs. The websites can only get me so far...
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Applied: 10
Accepted: 5
Interview: 3
Rejected: 3
Withdrawals: 2

Decision: NYU, Joint PhD in French Literature and French Studies

#30 Oeuf

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:37 AM

Congrats to all who have gotten acceptances / interviews!

I'm into one of my top choices (Vanderbilt), but I'm waiting very impatiently for the other results... If I haven't been invited for an interview, does that mean I'm definitely not accepted? I was really hoping to get into UPenn, but I haven't heard a word from them. I know that's not a good sign, but why haven't they let rejected applicants know, if they already have a shortlist? Until I hear something definitive I have this irritating, tiny thread of hope...

Has anyone heard anything from Stanford or Northwestern?
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#31 JoeySsance

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 06:48 PM

Hey everyone. I had also considered Berkeley, which is indeed a wonderful program, and I would be happy to offer advice about the funding question. This definitely came up and was ultimately one (but not the sole) factor that influenced my decision.

As for why rejected applicants aren't notified right away, I'm afraid the answer is that often it's not the departments but rather the graduate schools who send these notifications. Frankly, when things zoom out to the larger administrative/bureaucratic level, they get less personalized and even less considerate. From what I've read on other threads it seems like rejected applicants are often tortured by being notified of their rejections at the latest possible moment. In the meantime, hang in there and celebrate the offers and interviews you do have! :)

Finally, since it doesn't seem like anyone here has posted a Harvard acceptance this year, I just thought I'd let those of you who applied know that acceptances and waitlist decisions all indeed went out a little over a week ago and we've already started meeting the prospective candidates. I'm really sorry if you haven't heard back but hopefully this will help make the wait a little less stressful!
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Final decision: Harvard, PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures

#32 gibreel

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 02:07 AM

Congrats to all who have gotten acceptances / interviews!

I'm into one of my top choices (Vanderbilt), but I'm waiting very impatiently for the other results... If I haven't been invited for an interview, does that mean I'm definitely not accepted? I was really hoping to get into UPenn, but I haven't heard a word from them. I know that's not a good sign, but why haven't they let rejected applicants know, if they already have a shortlist? Until I hear something definitive I have this irritating, tiny thread of hope...

Has anyone heard anything from Stanford or Northwestern?



Hello Oeuf,

UPenn aleady had their campus visit on the 17th, and Northwestern is having theirs on the 1st of March.

Congratulations about getting into one of your top choices. I heard that Vanderbilt has an excellent French program.

On the same note, has anyone heard from Duke yet?

Edited by gibreel, 25 February 2012 - 02:09 AM.

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Applied: Yale, UPenn, Cornell, Duke, Northwestern, UChicago.
Accepted: UChicago, Yale, Northwestern, UPenn, Duke
Rejected:
Waitlisted: Cornell

FINAL DECISION: YALE

#33 JoeySsance

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 08:46 PM

Hey everyone. If you're at all curious about when you can expect to hear back from certain programs, while it varies from year to year, I would suggest taking a look at the results page on this site: http://thegradcafe.c...urvey/index.php Looking at the past few years collectively should give you a rough estimate. For example, by typing in "Duke French" I can see that they tend to notify people in the second half of February and last year the decision came out on this very day (2/25). So if it hasn't come yet, I would assume early or mid next week would be a safe bet (for an acceptance, I mean). Gibreel, maybe you know this but in case not, apparently Cornell has already notified people of acceptances and the visiting days. Congrats to you on your exciting offers so far! What are your interests? In fact, for those of you who haven't mentioned your interests yet, I'd be curious to learn about them (as I imagine others here might be). I'm mainly working on 20th century and contemporary French and francophone literature. I'm especially interested in postcolonial texts and issues of race, gender and sexuality. I've recently also started looking into French imperialism historically - mainly in the Caribbean and in North Africa - and its influence on French literature around and shortly after the French Revolution and in the 19th century onward more generally. And if my username and icon didn't give it away, I'm also interested in psychoanalysis and post-structuralist theory and criticism in general. Clearly my interests are still developing since I'm just a first-year student, but I'm loving my program so far and my coursework has been great in terms of helping me hone in on specific authors and questions. When I applied, I was vaguely interested in the 20th century more generally and now I feel considerably more grounded (and excited to be working on francophone lit written outside of the Hexagon)!

I look forward to learning a bit more about all of your interests. Again, feel free to contact me if you have any questions at all. :)
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Final decision: Harvard, PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures

#34 Starlajane

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 09:03 PM

I'm visiting Berkeley later in March. I love Berkeley's program as well. I've already been in contact with my POI and she's agreed to be my mentor should I choose to go there. What worries me most about Berkeley though is that it's apart of the UC system and I'm concerned about the security of my funding throughout the program. Penn and NYU offer generous stipends that are guaranteed for 5 years, although NYC is super expensive. I'm still trying to weigh the ranking vs. fit vs. placement record question as well. The 2010 NRC rankings put both Penn and NYU above Berkeley for French and after looking at all of their placement records, I was much more impressed by Penn and NYU. Suffice it to say, a lot of my decision will depend on how I feel after having visited all three programs. The websites can only get me so far...


Well, if the funding is sketchy, and you already have acceptances at the other two places, then I really would move it to your "maybe" pile, although I have found that rankings don't mean squat; fit really is the determinging factor. Because no one wants to attend a high-ranking program for which he or she feels absolutely no affinity.

Anyway, all of this is moo (you know, it's a cow's opinion, so it doesn't matter (;) until you've visited every program and been accepted by them. I think that funding and fit (not just according to program but also according to city) should be your top priority--where you think you will thrive the most--because it is very difficult to do well in a program if you hate where you live and work and are starving to boot.
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#35 gibreel

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:12 AM

Hey everyone. If you're at all curious about when you can expect to hear back from certain programs, while it varies from year to year, I would suggest taking a look at the results page on this site: http://thegradcafe.c...urvey/index.php Looking at the past few years collectively should give you a rough estimate. For example, by typing in "Duke French" I can see that they tend to notify people in the second half of February and last year the decision came out on this very day (2/25). So if it hasn't come yet, I would assume early or mid next week would be a safe bet (for an acceptance, I mean). Gibreel, maybe you know this but in case not, apparently Cornell has already notified people of acceptances and the visiting days. Congrats to you on your exciting offers so far! What are your interests? In fact, for those of you who haven't mentioned your interests yet, I'd be curious to learn about them (as I imagine others here might be). I'm mainly working on 20th century and contemporary French and francophone literature. I'm especially interested in postcolonial texts and issues of race, gender and sexuality. I've recently also started looking into French imperialism historically - mainly in the Caribbean and in North Africa - and its influence on French literature around and shortly after the French Revolution and in the 19th century onward more generally. And if my username and icon didn't give it away, I'm also interested in psychoanalysis and post-structuralist theory and criticism in general. Clearly my interests are still developing since I'm just a first-year student, but I'm loving my program so far and my coursework has been great in terms of helping me hone in on specific authors and questions. When I applied, I was vaguely interested in the 20th century more generally and now I feel considerably more grounded (and excited to be working on francophone lit written outside of the Hexagon)!

I look forward to learning a bit more about all of your interests. Again, feel free to contact me if you have any questions at all. :)


Hey Joey,

Thanks for the tip. I already know abt the results page, and have posted there a few times myself ;) But it seems that francophiles and francophones are rare on this site. I thought I would ask on the off-chance that someone heard from Duke but didn't post yet. I'm pretty sure I've been rejected by Cornell, but I wish Duke would get back to the applicants soon, so I can make a decision. But I shouldn't complain, I'm pretty lucky and mostly happy with the offers right now :) Duke was among my first choices, but I'm leaning toward Yale at the moment.

Actually we are almost in the same fields, you and I. I work on francophone lit as well. Until now, I was working mostly on Quebecois lit, but will probably look more into Caribbean and Indian Ocean francophone literatures from now on. I also used Lacanian concepts quite a bit in my MA thesis. I was also thinking of making a historical link between Caribbean and Indian Ocean literatures, but realised I need to brush up on my French colonial history. Since you mentioned that you're reading up on French Imperialism, do you have a good book/good books to recommend that would give me a general basis of French history, while being also more centred on colonialism, and especially on the relationship between French and British colonialism?

How are you finding Harvard in terms of Francophone Lit? Any advice you can give to us in general?

C'est quand même bien de t'avoir sur ce site. Toutes ces décisions peuvent être intimidantes, je l'avoue. Et de voir quelqu'un qui a déjà pris sa décision, commencé ses études et qui est heureux(se) et confiant(e), eh bien, c'est très encourageant! :)

Edited by gibreel, 28 February 2012 - 04:13 AM.

  • 0
Applied: Yale, UPenn, Cornell, Duke, Northwestern, UChicago.
Accepted: UChicago, Yale, Northwestern, UPenn, Duke
Rejected:
Waitlisted: Cornell

FINAL DECISION: YALE

#36 JoeySsance

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 10:02 PM

Hey everyone. Next weekend I'll be presenting at my very first graduate conference (wish me luck)! Needless to say, I'll be a bit m.i.a. from this forum until after the conference. Please do continue to contact me via PM and I'll be happy to respond when I'm back in town. Gibreel, je t'enverrai une réponse plus détaillé à ce moment-là. :) Cela me fait plaisir de vous aider comme je peux (étant donné que l'on m'a tellement bien conseillé ici l'année dernière quand j'étais à votre place). Bon courage, les amis !
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Final decision: Harvard, PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures

#37 gibreel

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:57 PM

Oooh exciting! Good luck! Let us know how it goes.
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Applied: Yale, UPenn, Cornell, Duke, Northwestern, UChicago.
Accepted: UChicago, Yale, Northwestern, UPenn, Duke
Rejected:
Waitlisted: Cornell

FINAL DECISION: YALE

#38 france2010

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 01:04 AM

Did anybody hear from Princeton today? I went down for an interview and was told we would be notified informally today.
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#39 france2010

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 05:28 AM

Nevermind, I heard back!
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#40 Zeugma

Zeugma

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:18 PM

Congrats to everyone's acceptances and interviews! :) It's finally March 1st, and the long waiting periods are coming to an end.

I'm currently wading through some of my offers and have been really impressed by University of Michigan-Ann Arbor's program. Does anybody have any comments on UMich's Romance Language and Literatures (French Literature) program? (i.e., prestige/quality/urban milieu, etc.)

For those interested in Duke, I personally know some of the professors there; and they are some of the nicest, most down-to-earth people you can imagine. Students are definitely their number one priority. Same with Wisconsin-Madison and Cornell. Unfortunately, on the other hand, I felt as if some of the professors at NYU, although cordial, were somewhat distant.

Anyway, congratulations to everybody!
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