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Essential sociocultural reading?


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26 replies to this topic

#21 far_to_go

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:32 PM

wheninhell, since you mentioned legal anthro: I'm in a legal anthro seminar this semester, and here's our reading list:

- Sally Engle Merry. 1990. Getting Justice and Getting Even: Legal consciousness among working-class Americans.
- Lawrence Rosen. 2008. Law as Culture: An Invitation.
- Susan Hirsch. 1998. Pronouncing and Persevering: Gender and the discourses of disputing in an African Islamic court.
- Michelle Alexander. 2010. The New Jim Crow: Mass incarceration in the age of colorblindness.
- Mark West. 2005. Law in Everyday Japan: Sex, Sumo, Suicide, and Statutes.
- Sally Engle Merry. 2006. Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating international law into local justice.
- Nicholas Dirks. 2001. Castes of Mind: Colonialism and the making of modern India.
- Michael Brown. 2004. Who Owns Native Culture?
- Michael Herzfeld. 1993. The Social Production of Indifference: Exploring the symbolic roots of Western bureaucracy.
- Annelise Riles. 2011. Collateral Knowledge: Legal reasoning in the global financial markets.
- Kamari Clarke. 2009. Fictions of Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Challenge of Legal Pluralism in Sub-Saharan Africa.
- Ugo Mattei and Laura Nader. 2008. Plunder: When the rule of law is illegal.

I listed them in the order that we're reading them. Hope you find something interesting/helpful for you! Best of luck.
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#22 dorislei

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:46 PM

So glad I found this thread.
I am preparing myself for a second take this year. Not having much anthropology background with me (only three graduate courses so far), I need to read a lot.

My interest is in semiotics, religion, feminism, psychology in particular.
Could anybody kindly suggest any important books in these fields?

Thank you a bunch! :)
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#23 chalkdust

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 03:21 AM

elman service, marshal sahlins, julian steward, gannath obeysekere are all on my list. levi strauss and radcliffe brown are essential i think. very interesting. and max weber and emile durkheim
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#24 coffeeandmilk

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 05:34 AM

More for legal anthro:

-- Anything by Carol Greenhouse!

-- Larry Rosen: Lawrence Rosen is both an anthropologist and a lawyer. His main interests are in the relation between cultural concepts and their implementation in social and legal relationships. His main fieldwork has been in North Africa; he has also worked as an attorney on a number of American Indian legal cases. His publications include Law as Culture: An Invitation, The American Indian and the Law (editor), Meaning and Order in Moroccan Society (co-author), Bargaining for Reality: The Construction of Social Relations in a Muslim Community, The Anthropology of Justice: Law as Culture in Muslim Society, and Other Intentions: Cultural Contexts and the Attribution of Inner States (editor).
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#25 kphd

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:39 PM

Beyond the Body Proper- is a personal favorite as a reader about embodiment, but it isn't really a "classic". It would familiarize you with anthropological thought, but ground you in theory... um, no.

Some Foucault perhaps- though he is not an anthro everyone cites his work. (along with Marx, Weber, and Freud)

Bear in mind that, most likely, you will not be the only person in your program who does not have an anthro background. You will gain a solid foundation in the first two years. I think it is a better idea to just read stuff that interests you and then take a look at what sources they have used and read some of those works. Anthropology is a holistic discipline, which is why you can read a lot fo material outside the confines of the discipline and it will still be entirely relevent.

Good luck in your studies!


Hi! I have not any anthro at all I like the idea of reading what interests me rather than start course work. But I how do I prepare a research proposal/statement of purpose without reading up on the subject. will it be OK for me to say something on the lines of.....this is how I got interested in anthro and this is the broadly the area that I want to work on though I have no prior experience in this field...?

Thanks,
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#26 kphd

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:45 PM

I hear you, but my advice is...Don't read anything. Relax. You'll knock back the usual suspects soon enough with your professors and cohort. (I never took an anthropology class before I started my PhD.)


I am so glad I came across this post!
I have never done an anthro class but I must prepare a statement of purpose and how do I do that without reading some important work.
Is it enough to say that I have the ability to learn as shown in my GRE scores and the enthusiasm for the topic I choose?

Thanks
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#27 chalkdust

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 06:47 PM

im really interested in the history of the social sciences so i am currently reading freud and lacan, knowing who the influences are like saussure and heidegger, husserl and sartre. i also think carl jung, august comte, marx, foucault, slavoj zizeck, hegel, judith butler, derrida, david graeber are all cool. the four myth science books by levi strauss are all on my to do list.
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