Boulder, CO

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Posted

Anyone can give me some info about living in Boulder, Colorado?

Thanks

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Posted

I did an REU at CU last summer. It's a good place to be, but I don't think I'd want to spend 5 years there(probably personal preference).

Boulder is great for outdoorsy stuff - its super easy to get out of town on your bike and ride up a mountain, go kayaking or whatever. You'll be in heaven if you like that sort of stuff.

You'll probably need a car, Colorado public transportation is kind of crappy.

About the town 'vibe' -

CU is a college town and it has a reputation as a hippy-esque town. It's acutally pretty yuppie now - there are a few remnants of that still around(e.g Penny Lane - a famous coffee shop - closed down the summer I was there), but they are disappearing fast. It's quickly becoming very upper-middle class, expensive and suburban.

Rent is damn high around campus, but you can easily get away with something cheap by getting roommates.

ermm... what else... if you have specific questions, ask them

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I've only visited the area because I have a friend there, but I would have to agree with Dave though I found the atmosphere a bit less suburban, though there's of course Starbucks and Target. My friend lives about 20 minutes outside of town though and it's much cheaper. There are buse in town, but a car or at least a bike seems like a must even if you live in town. As for outdoors, there's a mountain that you can hike that's right on the edge of town, you could bike there or take a bus. Also, Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park are about 1 hour from town so there's skiing and hiking and wildlife, not to mention cute mountain towns with antique shops for your parents to hang out in when they visit. Don't forget, if you like a night out on the weekend or need a shopping fix, you have the option of going to Denver, which is easy driving distance for a weekend outing. Can't vouch for what there is to do in Denver but it's a major city at least. I liked it, but then I was only visiting. And, I should add, it wasn't as unbearably cold as I thought it would be (over Christmas break).

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Posted

I definitely like Boulder. I did an internship there last summer, and I have visited on various occasions prior to that. Rent can be pretty expensive compared to other medium-sized and even large cities. You can get a room for $450++ per month. Groceries are pretty expensive, in my opinion. In Boulder, everyone lives healthy, so there are lots of stores that sell healthy but expensive foods. As far as having a car, I don't think that it is a must. I knew some grad students who had bikes only and got along fine. Biking is VERY popular in Boulder. You'd feel left out if you didn't have one.

As far as the weather--you'll love it: cool breeze in the summers and a very soft winters. It snow quite a bit but doesn't get freezing cold (not the terrible wind chill of Chicago or the cold winters of upper-state New York). I have heard people from Boulder say that they have one of the best climates in the States. I don't think they are far away from the truth. Perhaps San Diego can beat Boulder, but not too many other areas could.

I agree with the previous post--the parks, skiing resorts and the general area is terrific. I could definitely spend five years there!! :)

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Posted

I need to begin looking for an apartment, and I want something away from The Hill, near a grocery store and coffeeshop, if possible. Any suggestions?

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Posted

I need to begin looking for an apartment, and I want something away from The Hill, near a grocery store and coffeeshop, if possible. Any suggestions?

Hey LanthyPhair, I went to CU-Boulder as an undergrad and have stayed working at the university as a prof. research assistant while taking time off before going to grad school. I lived off of Table Mesa & Broadway in Boulder and really liked it. It's a few miles south of the university, but there are multiple bus routes (the Skip, Dash, 204, for example) that are around the area. There are quite a lot of complexes in the area as well. I lived in a townhome in Tantra Lake Apartments (they have both townhomes and apartments) but there are lots of complexes around the area (e.g., Coronado Springs, Stanford Apts) and it is far enough from the noisiness of the undergrads, but still close. (And there is a grocery store right on the corner of Table Mesa/Broadway). Boulder is certainly pricey for one bedroom apartments unfortunately. After I graduated I moved a little outside of Boulder to Superior/Louisville (down the highway about 10 minutes) and moved even further this past year (still only 20 minutes away).

For some of the previous posts that are saying you need a car, that's absolutely incorrect. There is fantastic public transportation in Denver/Boulder and the metro area. (They actually received an award for the fastest growing or something along those lines). The only reason I'm willing to live as far away as I do is because I just ride the bus in and out everyday. It's nice to just sit back and relax and read or something.

Good luck in your search and feel free to message me if you have more specific questions! Boulder is beautiful, and I'm sure you'll love it. Just take advantage of the gorgeous weather, pleasant scenery, and multitude of activities!

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Posted

So I am considering going to Boulder, but am a little concerned with the cost of living. I believe the stipend offered by this particular grad program hovers somewhere in the vicinity of 15k. From what I've read, I'm not certain that that is enough to get by.

Can anyone speak to this??

Thanks!

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Posted

I bet you could get by on 15k, though it wouldn't leave you with a lot left over! Like has been said, one bedroom/studios are very expensive. I'm currently in a studio in Boulder, and I'm pretty sure it's about the very cheapest there is, at about $570 (plus distributed utilities, so about 620-630). Not to mention the studio is pretty much a junker, and only about 300-350ish square feet. I think a decent 1 bedroom could be found for around $700. On the other hand, if you go for a two bedroom, you could probably find a decent place for 450-500 without much trouble.

If you don't mind taking a bus/commuting about 20 minutes, you can go to one of the towns next to Boulder which aren't so gentrified, and find a place for much cheaper.

Housing aside, it's possible to get by really cheap. Public transit and bike paths make it completely doable to get by without a car. For other expenses, Boulder caters to a pretty wealthy group of people. But, if you look around, there are always alternatives to the overpriced things that can be found (be it food, groceries, etc.).

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Posted

I need to begin looking for an apartment, and I want something away from The Hill, near a grocery store and coffeeshop, if possible. Any suggestions?

My favorite part of Boulder is the Goss-Grove area, just to the north of campus across Arapahoe. The location is great (by far the best of the places I've lived in Boulder) and the neighborhood looks nice. It's really not a great place to travel in by car, as the streets cut off all over the place, but that makes it perfect for walking/biking around. I am able to walk to the campus in 10 minutes, or bike in about 5. And about a 10 minute walk in the other direction is the main strip of Pearl street. Sunflower Farmers market is right down the street for groceries, and there are multiple coffee shops nearby.

The biggest drawback is the large number of undergrads, but it's certainly not in the same ballpark as the Hill. A lot of them seem to be from Naropa, which is a plus.

Edit: I see I am about a year late in this response :shock:

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Posted

Thanks, dirkduck. That was very helpful information.

Does anyone else have any thoughts/opinions on Boulder? I've heard mostly good things, so I'm curious to hear anything (particularly negative) else about the area.

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I am thinking of going to UC Boulder. But, one of my husband and I's goals was buying a home or condo where we moved. Boulder is too expensive for us--as I will be living off a stipend. But we were thinking in the range of $150,000. Anyways, It seems we will need to look elsewhere. I was wondering about your thoughts on longmont, co. It a nice place to live and buy a house? Would it be difficult to commute between Boulder and Longmont? How is the commute from Longmont to Denver? Any other suggestions on affordable places to buy? Really anything you guys know about the area would be helpful. Thanks!!!

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Hey luna. I don't really know too much about Longmont, but I am sure that it is significantly cheaper than Boulder. In terms of commute, I am fairly sure that the bus system runs between Longmont-Boulder, otherwise it would be about a 25 minute drive or so (to the campus) I would guess.

As another option, you may want to look at Louisville or Lafayette. They are both cheaper than Boulder, and would cut down on commute time to either Boulder or Denver (compared to Longmont). I also know the bus system runs to those areas.

Overall, I can't really say much for sure in terms of prices between Longmont and Louisville/Lafayette, but based on location I would go for Louisville. That being said, I know of a number of CU students that live in Longmont and don't seem to have any problem with the commute. Hopefully someone more familiar with those areas can say more!

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Thanks, dirkduck. That was very helpful information.

Does anyone else have any thoughts/opinions on Boulder? I've heard mostly good things, so I'm curious to hear anything (particularly negative) else about the area.

Hey SharperImage, I can try to add the negative things that come to mind off the top of my head. First off, the Boulder/CU police force is not something to be proud of (to put it nicely). Crime is not a very big issue in Boulder, but the police seem to be on a power trip against the students and others (and seem to direct their resources towards minor infractions instead of focusing on the larger crimes that occasionally occur).

Driving in Boulder is a big hassle. Foremost, other drivers seem to be terrible. The common hypothesis seems to be having a bunch of people from all over the country coming together and expecting everyone else to drive like they do. In addition, the city is laid out to cater largely to walkers and bikers. I think this is a big plus, but for people that drive most of the time, it can be a downside(for instance, lots of crosswalks in the middle of streets, bike lanes everywhere...you just need to be very aware of what's going on when driving). In addition, factor in the police that love to ticket for fun plus camera's at many intersections.

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Posted

I was wondering about your thoughts on longmont, co. It a nice place to live and buy a house?

As a Colorado native (who lived in the Boulder area from 98-06) I

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Posted

From the website of CU, I found lots of students hall, like residence Halls, family housing, etc.

I do not know which one is good for me. I do not want to live far away from campus since I do not have a car now. Also I need private space which means I want to live in a quiet place.

Anyway, is there anybody who wants to find a roommate or anyone who can introduce more about living in CU?

Thanks!

PS: I go there for PhD in ME

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Posted

Hi,

I'm a PhD student in marketing, starting August 1st 2009. I'm female, single and also looking for a roommate/housemate. My main aim is to keep the rent low (below $625/month, including all utilities and internet). The closer the room/apartment is to the university the better. But I don't mind living 30mins away from the university as long as there's bus to school, as I don't plan to own a car at this point yet.

I'm a student from Asia, and due to visa reasons I won't be able to visit Boulder early to look for room or sign lease. I can only go there around August 1st. This is a huge challenge for me. Anyone, preferably grad students, who want to share room/house are much appreciated.

Thanks

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Posted

Anyone have any suggestions on apartments in Broomfield?

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Posted

Hello everyone,

I plan to join CU-Boulder from this Fall. I currently live in VA and was wondering if someone has any ideas about driving there from VA.

I have a car which needs to be transported. My initial thought was to get it shipped but some light research showed me that it would cost me around 1K to do that. That is a signifiant amount and as an alternative, I was thinking about turning this into an opportunity for a sort of road-trip. Does anyone have any useful tips for doing this, in terms of best route, precautions, anything?

Thanks!

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I was thinking about turning this into an opportunity for a sort of road-trip. Does anyone have any useful tips for doing this, in terms of best route, precautions, anything?

Thanks!

No particular tips. That's a pretty easy route. Just have good music and some water and snacks. Kansas is boring (IMO)You're on I64 for something like 700 miles. It's hard to get lost! My best advice? Take a friend and give yourself a bunch of days to do it. It will be fun. I love road trips.

Good luck! Boulder is a pretty town.

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I finished my M.A. at Boulder last May and, to fill the time while I wait for all those Ph.D acceptance letters to come pouring in (any day now, right?!), I thought I'd pass on some highly relevant Boulder/Denver info.

local coffee shop reviews:

http://coffeebot.co/

This site adds new reviews for the area about 1-2 times per week.

*Back to staring absently at the snow*

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Hello! I have recently received an admissions offer to the University of Colorado at Boulder for graduate school. I am planning to move there this summer to get settled in before school begins. My fiance and I are hoping to buy a starter home. What are some areas to avoid (b/c of crime, crowded conditions, too many undergraduates)? What are some great neighborhoods in Boulder? I am hoping to stay out of the "pricier" areas - my stipend is not much! I also want to avoid living where the undergraduates do - I do not want/need to party and I would love some quiet. Thank you so much to everyone who takes the time to send me some advice!

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I already checked out the other postings on Boulder, Co. I read every single post, and I was still looking for more information. I didn't feel that the questions I had were accurately answered in that post. I am sorry for annoying so many people, but I did do my research beforehand. I was hoping to get new perspective on the topic.

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I already checked out the other postings on Boulder, Co. I read every single post, and I was still looking for more information. I didn't feel that the questions I had were accurately answered in that post. I am sorry for annoying so many people, but I did do my research beforehand. I was hoping to get new perspective on the topic.

Boulder isn't cheap. At all. I know someone who bought there while a grad student, but she'd been working previously and had quite a bit of money put away. (If you are in this position too, expect to get a condo or townhouse rather than a house.)

If you want cheap you need to go out to surrounding areas, like Longmont. Longmont isn't nearly as nice as Boulder, but you can get a decent home there for a decent price.

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Boulder doesn't really have cheap housing, and depending on where you are coming from, prepare to be shocked at what you pay for what you get. We used to live in a shoebox with a front door :-) There are very strict growth restrictions in the city itself, so demand will always be higher than the supply. The vacancy rate used to be like 1%, but that has improved. It used to be that when you went to look at a rental, you had to see it with several others and whoever bribed the property manager won the space. That has settled back a bit now, but the prices went up. If you want to rent and want the best selection, get there in June and sublet the tail end of someone else's lease, then renew. 'Boulder prop. management' are slumlords, so stay away from their listings. Students are everywhere since the university is like 20% of the residents. The highest student concentration is 'on the hill' especially east of 9th. As you get into the single digit street's, it gets more $ but nicer because you are close to open space and the foothills. East Boulder (east of Foothills pkwy) is cheap, but not so great. North of downtown is nicer and a bit more grown up than the hill, but similar in price. Martin Acres is just to the south of campus, mostly 60's ranches, and is an area where you will find an in town house that you could maybe call affordable. Longmont is about 15 min northeast and is getting better due to Boulder's overflow, but not my fav., but not so bad either. Lafayette and Louisville are more family oriented and in between Boulder and Broomfield, also about a 10-15 minute commute. If you want a shiny new suburban house, head up 36 to Broomfield, or east to Erie. Nederland is in the mountains to the west, and cute if you want to live up in the hills and you are a stout lover of snow type. Public transportation into Boulder is pretty good from all of the outlying cities, including Denver. The advantage to living in Boulder proper is that you don't need a car, and you can walk or bike to a hiking trail and lose humanity within an hour. It is very beautiful there and has low crime overall. Hope that helps. Enjoy 303.

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