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JessicaLange

2017 Acceptances

1,615 posts in this topic

31 minutes ago, imogenshakes said:

I was accepted too! Congratulations to you! I will certainly be at the open house. I'm not sure about how much, if any, of the travel they cover; I would assume there will be some help (all of the programs I've been accepted to have a set amount they've offered to help with), but my partner and I were already planning to vacation a couple of hours away from there, so I wasn't really planning on finding out. I'm sure we will hear as soon as they send a schedule for the day, though. 

Maybe I'll see you there!

Awesome! Is UCSB one of your top choices? I'd love to chat over email or something if you're open to it, it'd be nice to get to know someone who might end up in the same program. I'm still waiting on two schools, but not really hoping too hard for acceptances there; unless something really unexpected happens, it's a pretty sure thing I'll go. Thanks for your input--I sent an email asking about travel expenses, so hopefully I'll hear back soon. 

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14 hours ago, everyblueline said:

ok, question about this, from a long(!)-time lurker---I found out Tuesday that I was accepted to Cornell, and I was accepted a while ago to Chicago. Am interested in visual art, theory, and poetics. Out of those two depts, which would people recommend? Would v much appreciate help! 🌱

 

 

Short-time lurker. From the research I've done, Chicago seems more hospitable to work done in visual art, theory, and poetics (not that Cornell isn't!). The theory lean at Chicago is observable even in the interesting committees assembled (Committee on Social Thought/ Committee on the Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science). My sense is that you would have the opportunity there for a lot of interdisciplinary interaction around your interests, specifically. Of course, both schools are prime choices. It might be worth doing some more research on faculty members/ grad students in your field and related fields at both schools to see what sort of work is coming out of both schools and to get a sense of which might be a better fit. Just a suggestion.

Just a word re: the School of Criticism & Theory. Cornell is home to SCT at the moment (it has happened at other schools in the past), but it is a loose affiliation at best, and lends the program a sort of "prestige" it might not be attributed if conducted at another school. I was at SCT this past summer. I attended with just a CDN MA. It is mostly attended by doctoral students and post-docs (from all over the place-- the program prides itself on being a site for international collaboration). It is an incredible way to spend six weeks. In response to @Warelin on SCT, being a student at Cornell doesn't guarantee you a spot, but there were a few Cornell students that participated when I was there. I got the sense that a lot of Cornell students take the opportunity to get out of Ithaca during the summer, and skip over to more happening cities, however. Given that it takes place during the summer and that most of the seminar faculty are from other institutions, one has minimal contact with Cornell as an institution itself, besides having limited access to the resources and being able to chill on the beautiful campus. I didn't apply to Cornell this year. I did apply to Chicago. My thought, having spent time in Ithaca, is that you should bear in mind that Ithaca is a super-duper small city. I'm not sure exactly what the Chicago campus is like, but as someone who has spent the last 7 or so years living in a large-scale, multicultural metropolis, Ithaca-living would be a tough shift to make full-time, even while it was a gorgeous reprieve. It is a good place if you want to completely dissolve into your research with minimal distractions. I have a friend finishing his PhD at Cornell, and, finally freed from instructorships for a while, he is writing his dissertation in NYC this year, because "four years in Ithaca is plenty, thanks." Definitely consider whether you thrive in a city or would prefer a sleepy upstate town to do grad work in. That would be at the forefront of my mind in deciding between Chicago and Ithaca. They are both wicked schools, friendly to theory, with incredible resources. Also, if you go to Chicago, you will have an equal chance of being admitted to SCT as a student at Cornell, so you could still experience Cornell in some capacity over the course of your grad career. Good luck!

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GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.

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7 minutes ago, eadwacer said:

GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.

Congrats on your acceptance! :)

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9 minutes ago, eadwacer said:

GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.

Congrats!

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10 minutes ago, eadwacer said:

GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.

Fantastic news! Congratulations!

2 hours ago, chamakay said:

Awesome! Is UCSB one of your top choices? I'd love to chat over email or something if you're open to it, it'd be nice to get to know someone who might end up in the same program. I'm still waiting on two schools, but not really hoping too hard for acceptances there; unless something really unexpected happens, it's a pretty sure thing I'll go. Thanks for your input--I sent an email asking about travel expenses, so hopefully I'll hear back soon. 

Yes, it is. I think it's down to Madison, Davis, and SB for me. I'm certainly open to an email chat anytime! :) 

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31 minutes ago, eadwacer said:

GOT MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE from the MA program at UBC. I'm so happy, it's a great fit. I don't feel like I can accept immediately before I know if I've been admitted to any funded PhDs (since I'm American and a Canadian MA may be financially challenging) but this is such good news. It's such a load off to know that no matter what else happens I have at least one option for next year.

Congrats!

Vancouver is quite expensive (it's my hometown), but you do have the exchange rate working in your favor. It's also a very metro-friendly city, and has some beautiful summer weather and typically mild winters (when it's not raining). I haven't lived there in over seven years, but if you decide to attend, feel free to PM me and I can give you recommendations and potentially put you in touch with some folks. :)

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got into NYU! I'm stressed out because I have a hard decision to make, but I'm happy!!!

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13 minutes ago, shoestofollow said:

got into NYU! I'm stressed out because I have a hard decision to make, but I'm happy!!!

Also in at NYU! And I too will have a tough choice. Congrats!!

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Long time lurker, first time poster.

So, I'm trying to weigh two very different offers.  I have an offer to get my PhD, funded in full, at a very reputable program—top 20. I also have an offer to get an MA from a tippy-top program.  Regarding fit with research interests, they are pretty even.  So, am I crazy? I take the PhD offer, right?  Thanks for any advice.

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Has anybody heard words from Northeastern or Loyola Chicago? Trying to figure out if I'm on an imagined waitlist or not.......

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16 minutes ago, Hartley said:

Long time lurker, first time poster.

So, I'm trying to weigh two very different offers.  I have an offer to get my PhD, funded in full, at a very reputable program—top 20. I also have an offer to get an MA from a tippy-top program.  Regarding fit with research interests, they are pretty even.  So, am I crazy? I take the PhD offer, right?  Thanks for any advice.

I don't know your personal circumstances, but I'd go straight into the PhD if it were me. When I did my MA, it was because my undergraduate work was in an entirely different field. There would've been no way I would have ever gotten into a PhD program for English. If they're taking you, that means you've demonstrated your preparedness, not only through your GREs, SOP, and writing sample, but also from your undergraduate work. If your undergraduate preparation lacks in any area, they will likely request that you take additional courses to address that.

In short, I don't see any academic/professional benefits to your doing the MA first, but you may have personal concerns that make matters more complicated.

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1 hour ago, Hartley said:

Long time lurker, first time poster.

So, I'm trying to weigh two very different offers.  I have an offer to get my PhD, funded in full, at a very reputable program—top 20. I also have an offer to get an MA from a tippy-top program.  Regarding fit with research interests, they are pretty even.  So, am I crazy? I take the PhD offer, right?  Thanks for any advice.

 

I'm with Mel. Go for the funded PhD unless you've got a compelling reason to do otherwise.

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1 hour ago, Hartley said:

So, I'm trying to weigh two very different offers.  I have an offer to get my PhD, funded in full, at a very reputable program—top 20. I also have an offer to get an MA from a tippy-top program.  Regarding fit with research interests, they are pretty even.  So, am I crazy? I take the PhD offer, right?  Thanks for any advice.

1 hour ago, orphic_mel528 said:

I don't know your personal circumstances, but I'd go straight into the PhD if it were me.

...

In short, I don't see any academic/professional benefits to your doing the MA first, but you may have personal concerns that make matters more complicated.

23 minutes ago, positivitize said:

I'm with Mel. Go for the funded PhD unless you've got a compelling reason to do otherwise.

 

I largely agree with the wise folks above, but I will add one minor counterpoint.

A lot of this depends on you and your readiness to go down this path. The problem is that you might currently have no way to gauge that -- you might think that you'll be able to make an easy transition from undergraduate to doctoral level work, and discover that the chasm is far wider than you could have anticipated. OR it could just require a bit of rapid adaptation on your part, and you'll find you can adjust rather easily.

Two years ago, had I been accepted to a Ph.D. program as well as the M.A. program I ultimately attended, I almost certainly would have taken the Ph.D. program. However, with the luxury of hindsight, I can see how much better served I was by getting the M.A. before moving into a Ph.D. program. I still think I could have done well in a Ph.D. program right away, but the two years of M.A. work have been invaluable. In your situation, getting an M.A. from one of the highest ranked programs in the country could position you for even stronger work when you pursue a Ph.D. two years later.

All of that being said, I do think the most obvious choice is to go for the Ph.D. and don't look back. I just wouldn't want you to think that there's not at least some merit to the other option as well.

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Forgive me for any daftness, but what is the idea behind sending out acceptances and then (mostly) not putting the remainder on a waitlist, BUT waiting weeks or even more to inform the rejects? I understand it's different program to program, but I don't really understand why it's done that way. It's clearly a common anxiety as people talk about it here every year. They just want to have their finalized list done before they tell someone who had no chance getting in? It's given to the uni's graduate admissions office to handle and it just takes them a month to email?

BTW, I'm not complaining and I haven't bothered any unis over this. Just wondered if anyone else has insight.

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8 minutes ago, Wyatt's Terps said:

 

I largely agree with the wise folks above, but I will add one minor counterpoint.

A lot of this depends on you and your readiness to go down this path. The problem is that you might currently have no way to gauge that -- you might think that you'll be able to make an easy transition from undergraduate to doctoral level work, and discover that the chasm is far wider than you could have anticipated. OR it could just require a bit of rapid adaptation on your part, and you'll find you can adjust rather easily.

Two years ago, had I been accepted to a Ph.D. program as well as the M.A. program I ultimately attended, I almost certainly would have taken the Ph.D. program. However, with the luxury of hindsight, I can see how much better served I was by getting the M.A. before moving into a Ph.D. program. I still think I could have done well in a Ph.D. program right away, but the two years of M.A. work have been invaluable. In your situation, getting an M.A. from one of the highest ranked programs in the country could position you for even stronger work when you pursue a Ph.D. two years later.

All of that being said, I do think the most obvious choice is to go for the Ph.D. and don't look back. I just wouldn't want you to think that there's not at least some merit to the other option as well.

I think Wyatt brings up several good points.

I'd also like to add that acceptances anywhere aren't guaranteed by any means. Where you get into right now may not accept you two cycles from now. With that being said, what is your ultimate goal? If you're aiming for a R1 school then there's a good chance that you'll need a top 10 program. If the goal is a liberal arts, community college, or anything else, then the prestige of the college matters less than your teaching experience. Alternatively, you could take the MA program, develop your skills, do presentations and see how you change within the two years which is something that a PHD program wouldh't allow you to experience otherwise. You might find that your work interests and style do change. You may find that there are programs that are a better fit. You may realize that you may not even want to pursue a PHD. Or it may make you want to try a post-graduate fellowship or you may decide that you want to teach high school. There is no right or wrong answer but the Master degree can be pretty life changing by itself.

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36 minutes ago, etch00 said:

Forgive me for any daftness, but what is the idea behind sending out acceptances and then (mostly) not putting the remainder on a waitlist, BUT waiting weeks or even more to inform the rejects? I understand it's different program to program, but I don't really understand why it's done that way. It's clearly a common anxiety as people talk about it here every year. They just want to have their finalized list done before they tell someone who had no chance getting in? It's given to the uni's graduate admissions office to handle and it just takes them a month to email?

BTW, I'm not complaining and I haven't bothered any unis over this. Just wondered if anyone else has insight.

Sometimes, programs don't have a ranked waiting list and instead divide it by subfield. If that's the case, they may be waiting for someone to reject before offering it to the next person in the subfield. They may do this in order to make their "prestige" higher by keeping the admits low. Others may do this due to funding concerns or to make sure that they don't have too many people in one specific subfield enroll or to make sure that too many people get the same adviser. Others may indeed leave it up to the graduate school to decide which often has their own schedule of things that must be done. There are lots of things going on behind the scenes that we may not be aware of.

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Just found a Vanderbilt rejection on the portal (no email) for those who have been wondering...

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5 minutes ago, waitinwishin said:

Just found a Vanderbilt rejection on the portal (no email) for those who have been wondering...

C'est moi. I guess my hypothesis from yesterday was correct: just no GC folks with acceptances a few weeks back. Go figure!

Incidentally, while I'm not at all upset with their program, I can't deny that logging in to see text that reads "We are very pleased" before realizing that it's just the initial "thanks for applying" text before you click on the status update is a little disheartening!

Well, considering the implied rejection of Berkeley, I'm down to five left to hear back from. OSU is looking more and more like a certainty to me (even though it would have been a "finalist" no matter what happened).

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Out at Vanderbilt too - oh well. Someone posted a Yale acceptance via phone - anyone want to claim that?

 

7a/0w/5r

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1 minute ago, Sunsy said:

@Wyatt's Terps, @piers_plowman, I'm out at Vanderbilt too, which makes three early modernists! Oh well... And I too would love to hear about that Yale acceptance!

Dang - congrats to you mystery EM scholar-wizards who took the spot(s). Luckily all three of us have solid options already! Early modern solidarity!

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40 minutes ago, Warelin said:

Sometimes, programs don't have a ranked waiting list and instead divide it by subfield. If that's the case, they may be waiting for someone to reject before offering it to the next person in the subfield. They may do this in order to make their "prestige" higher by keeping the admits low. Others may do this due to funding concerns or to make sure that they don't have too many people in one specific subfield enroll or to make sure that too many people get the same adviser. Others may indeed leave it up to the graduate school to decide which often has their own schedule of things that must be done. There are lots of things going on behind the scenes that we may not be aware of.

Thanks, Warelin. That makes perfect sense. If there are any other reasons, feel free to explain to us new peeps.

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Also, for the person who posted on the results board that they got waitlisted at NYU and that it's their top choice, I'm 95-99% sure that I will turn NYU down, so I hope that helps you!

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