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Pets and Grad School

moyru

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One thing I've been thinking about lately is how my pets would handle the move across the country, if by some chance I actually got into HGSE.

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I've had Pirate (the cat) since I was in high school and have had Gordie (the dog) for about two years. I think Gordie would adapt more easily, as he's used to going on road trips. He's experienced snow once, too. Pirate, on the other hand, would take some time to adjust. He's never seen snow; I wonder what his reaction would be.

I also wonder about the cost and how difficult it would be to find housing. It took forever trying to find an affordable place where I currently live, as many of the apartments aren't pet friendly or charge an exorbitant fee for pets. I can understand a pet deposit but monthly pet rent? Really?

If it came down to it, I know I could trust family or friends to take my pets in for a year. I wouldn't feel comfortable doing that, though. My pets are my responsibility and it wouldn't be fair to anyone. I'd like to have my pets with me, too, as they're my support system. My boyfriend would be coming, too, so they would have that extra someone to look after them while I'm in classes.

Has anyone with pets experienced this? How did it work out?



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Too bad we can't live together! Haha. I'm in the same situation...I have a 1.5 year old dog that means everything to me and I can't bear to leave her at home when I move across the continent. How far are you going and how big are your animals? I guess I'm lucky in that my dog is small and easy to transport. 

 

You're also lucky that you have a significant other who can look after them. I will be living alone and am worried that I will be gone for long days...right now she can handle being alone for 8-10 hours a day but I really don't like doing that. I hope I can find somewhere very close to campus so I can at least go home for lunch breaks and such. 

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Too bad we can't live together! Haha. I'm in the same situation...I have a 1.5 year old dog that means everything to me and I can't bear to leave her at home when I move across the continent. How far are you going and how big are your animals? I guess I'm lucky in that my dog is small and easy to transport. 

 

You're also lucky that you have a significant other who can look after them. I will be living alone and am worried that I will be gone for long days...right now she can handle being alone for 8-10 hours a day but I really don't like doing that. I hope I can find somewhere very close to campus so I can at least go home for lunch breaks and such. 

If I do get in, I'd be traveling from California to Massachussets, which is over 3K miles. However, still in the same continent. I can't even imagine how to organize travel for pets across continents!

 

My animals aren't too big. My dog is a chihuahua terrier mix and is medium sized. My cat's smaller.

I would reach out to others near campus to see if anyone's in a similar situation, perhaps you can set something up?

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My husband and I moved our chihuahua terrier from California to Washington DC this summer. It was easier than expected, but not without its challenges. Our life saver was some anti-anxiety meds for the pup. They were all-natural, so they weren't tranquilizers or anything, and they helped keep the edge off during the six day road trip. We made frequent stops and packed a fan that we used at night in the hotels to block out some of the outdoor sounds. It was a difficult adjustment for him, but by week two of settling into our new home, he was much more settled. And now, he is totally in love with his new home! I can't imagine he'd be as comfortable with a family member; like all dogs, he has a pack mentality, and feels happiest and safest when we are all together. 

 

You'll find that many of grad students have pets from before grad school. One of my fellow students drove from Oregon to Maryland with two cats. Plus, you can always organize with classmates for to take turns with dog walking! It's totally possible to be a pet parent and a grad student at the same time! 

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Hey, moyru. Just to let you know - I'm a student at HDS, and I happen to know a nice couple with two cats who found a place that doesn't charge pet rent. Somerville has a lot of diverse housing arrangements, so don't worry about that just yet. 

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My husband and I moved our chihuahua terrier from California to Washington DC this summer. It was easier than expected, but not without its challenges. Our life saver was some anti-anxiety meds for the pup. They were all-natural, so they weren't tranquilizers or anything, and they helped keep the edge off during the six day road trip. We made frequent stops and packed a fan that we used at night in the hotels to block out some of the outdoor sounds. It was a difficult adjustment for him, but by week two of settling into our new home, he was much more settled. And now, he is totally in love with his new home! I can't imagine he'd be as comfortable with a family member; like all dogs, he has a pack mentality, and feels happiest and safest when we are all together. 

 

You'll find that many of grad students have pets from before grad school. One of my fellow students drove from Oregon to Maryland with two cats. Plus, you can always organize with classmates for to take turns with dog walking! It's totally possible to be a pet parent and a grad student at the same time! 

Do you know what these meds were called? I'll have to look into these.

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Hey, moyru. Just to let you know - I'm a student at HDS, and I happen to know a nice couple with two cats who found a place that doesn't charge pet rent. Somerville has a lot of diverse housing arrangements, so don't worry about that just yet. 

Thanks for this! If I get in, it's reassuring to know there are viable housing options.

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I work in a veterinary office. You can get Xanax for your dog and cat if prescribed by your veterinarian. They can usually script it out to a grocery store pharmacy for cheap. 

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I moved cross-country with my dog this summer and it really wasn't that bad, but my dog also really doesn't mind car trips. We spent 8-9 hours a day in the car with breaks for food and water. I also kept a steady supply of ice cubes so I could give them to her for hydration during the trip. One thing that did help was petswelcome.com, to identify pet-friendly hotels. I also found a website that I can't recall where you could search for dog parks anywhere, including along a specific route. So, a few times, I bought myself food, drove to a park, ate on a park bench, then took her into the dog park and let her run for an hour. Sure, it added an hour to a long day but it was worth it to let her get some exercise.

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I am dreading this as well. I've had my 60-pound pit bull mix for almost 5 years, and my boyfriend's cat has been with him about 7 years, and living with me, him, and the dog for 4. I know we could find places for them with family or friends, but part of me wants to take them!

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as for the pet rent if you get a note prescriping your pet for your mental health (ie depression, anixety) which I am sure is true for most grad students they are exempt from pet rent.  No way I am leaving my cat behind.  I go insane without pets.  Also your dog and cat are adroable!

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My husband and I moved our chihuahua terrier from California to Washington DC this summer. It was easier than expected, but not without its challenges. Our life saver was some anti-anxiety meds for the pup. They were all-natural, so they weren't tranquilizers or anything, and they helped keep the edge off during the six day road trip. We made frequent stops and packed a fan that we used at night in the hotels to block out some of the outdoor sounds. It was a difficult adjustment for him, but by week two of settling into our new home, he was much more settled. And now, he is totally in love with his new home! I can't imagine he'd be as comfortable with a family member; like all dogs, he has a pack mentality, and feels happiest and safest when we are all together. 

 

You'll find that many of grad students have pets from before grad school. One of my fellow students drove from Oregon to Maryland with two cats. Plus, you can always organize with classmates for to take turns with dog walking! It's totally possible to be a pet parent and a grad student at the same time! 

As an Oregonian looking at grad school with a cat this gives me hope :)

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