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  2. Are you at liberty to say what these rumblings are? Always trying to get my finger closer to the pulse of what's going on (though I don't think anyone could really predict what will happen).
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  4. searching for cornell orie, and i found you
  5. I think you just forced yourself into that offer. But you need to think carefully about declining it. The economic crisis arising from the pandemic does have an impact on educational institutions. If you do not have a full scholarship, consider this. Out of state and international students might shoulder the financial loss of schools after the pandemic, similar to what happened after the 2008 global economic crisis. Weigh the pros and cons, especially the financial impact of that program. You can reflect on the following questions: Will you have a better job opportunity in that field? Where will you work after, will you return to your home country or work where you will study? How competitive will be the job market for your field? Weigh both locations. What are your long-term aims? Will you be able to achieve your goals during and after six years of studies? That's a lengthy period. Consider your age after graduation if you plan to be in a new organization. If you already have one, you should not worry about it. Organizations give credit to a person's degree when it comes to promotion. But they have a maximum point for that. And it will not guarantee a high office. You will compete with others with an administrative position who stayed there and benefited the organization while you were studying. Excellent young college and master's degree graduates also land managerial positions. In a research organization, their mentors can promote them when they prove themselves capable of leading a project. You can also go on this route in case you decline your offer. I hope this helps! And I wish you success in your decision.
  6. Thank you. I somehow didn't get a notification about your reply. I wish I read your post sooner though. I went ahead and asked another professor if he was interested, and he responded within a day. I'll follow up with the professor I was concerned about though.
  7. Hi everybody - I'm super new to this site, but have found more than a few helpful posts thus far. I'm planing on applying for biostats / epi programs this cycle with the hope of matriculating in 2021; however, I'm torn between the two fields and simply can't decide what the right path is for me. I believe I'll eventually want a PhD, but I'm aiming for Masters programs initially. Posting my profile below, and would appreciate any thoughts or comments on what seems to be the better and also more realistic fit. Undergrad Institution: Liberal Arts, Top 50 Major(s): Natural Sciences (Biostatistics concentration) GPA: 3.82 Type of Student: Domestic, male, two or more races GRE General Test: Q: 163 V: 156 W: TBD - thinking 4+ as I think my essays were solid (fingers crossed) Programs Applying: Biostats or Epi (undecided) -- PhD is a stretch for sure but I'll throw a few to second tiers and below just to see what happens; realistically I'll end up at a Masters program, and I'm currently planning on applying to higher tiered schools Research Experience: 1 year of research in global health epi + additional research on supervised learning methods as they apply to sports modelling; epi paper is currently under review for publication and expected to be published Teaching Experience: tutored multivariable calculus and intro biology for a year in college Pertinent Activities or Jobs: 2 years in consulting working across life sciences & healthcare; not too relevant, but have done a bit of machine learning work Letters of Recommendation: one from an epidemiologist and another from a statistician (should be good); planning to get others from a manager at my company and my college career advisor Relevant Coursework: differential calculus, integral calculus, multivariable calculus, linear algebra, probability theory, mathematical statistics, normal model inference, nonlinear model inference, biostatistics, epidemiology, global health epidemiology, molecular biology Questions: 1. Is biostats or epi a better route given my profile? I really can't decide and like both fields equally as is. 2. Is it realistic to go for a PhD in biostats given an average quant GRE score and a lack of real analysis? I know that it's almost impossible to gain admittance to public health PhDs off the bat, so not considering that a viable option Appreciate any advice you may have, and thanks for taking the time!
  8. Hi everybody - I'm super new to this site, but have found more than a few helpful posts thus far. I'm planing on applying for biostats / epi programs this cycle with the hope of matriculating in 2021; however, I'm torn between the two fields and simply can't decide what the right path is for me. I believe I'll eventually want a PhD, but I'm aiming for Masters programs initially. Posting my profile below, and would appreciate any thoughts or comments on what seems to be the better and also more realistic fit. Undergrad Institution: Liberal Arts, Top 50 Major(s): Natural Sciences (Biostatistics concentration) GPA: 3.82 Type of Student: Domestic, male, two or more races GRE General Test: Q: 163 V: 156 W: TBD - thinking 4+ as I think my essays were solid (fingers crossed) Programs Applying: Biostats or Epi (undecided) -- PhD is a stretch but I'll throw a few to second tiers and below just to see what happens; realistically I'll end up at a Masters program, and I'm currently planning on applying to higher tiered schools Research Experience: 1 year of research in global health epi + additional research on supervised learning methods as they apply to sports modelling; epi paper is currently under review for publication and expected to be published Teaching Experience: tutored multivariable calculus and intro biology for a year in college Pertinent Activities or Jobs: 2 years in consulting working across life sciences & healthcare; not really pertinent but it's different Letters of Recommendation: one from an epidemiologist and another from a statistician (should be good); planning to get others from a manager at my company and my college career advisor Relevant Coursework: differential calculus, integral calculus, multivariable calculus, linear algebra, probability theory, mathematical statistics, normal model inference, nonlinear model inference, biostatistics, epidemiology, global health epidemiology, molecular biology Questions: 1. Is biostats or epi a better route given my profile? I really can't decide and like both fields equally as is. 2. Is it realistic to go for a PhD in biostats given an average quant GRE score and a lack of real analysis? I know that it's almost impossible to gain admittance to public health PhDs off the bat, so not considering that a viable option Thank you for the time and help!!! Really is much appreciated.
  9. If anyone else with perspective in this area can give a 2nd opinion, I think that would be helpful. However, my thoughts are: 1. Unlike PhD, Undergrad, or even more hard science oriented Master's programs, in a "terminal master's program", aligning with your faculty's field is usually less important. Generally speaking faculty are generally removed from professional opportunities as their goal is to publish and do research. Adjunct Professors (not Adjunct Instructors) can be of value in professional connections though. That being said, I wouldn't translate a Professor's field directly translating to career opportunities unless they are involved an experiential learning program. For professional schools, I think it is more important to see where the alumni have gone (you can do that via LinkedIn) and ask Career Services to talk to a current student. Professors are important for what skills, topics, and insights and they can provide. You make you credibility in the professional world by virtue of the projects you take on (with the school and without). That being said, I would check out your schools less by professors and more by alumni outcomes and reach out to recent alums in LinkedIn 2. So I can appreciate the Policy work isn't what you want to do. However, in terms of pathways to non-profit management in the food security space, the two most robust are via the business side and via the policy side. Hypothetically, you can also get to the non-profit management via the fundraising or event planning side, but that doesn't require a master's degree. Food security/sustainability is also extraordinarily complex that any management of it requires some level of policy understanding and analysis in understanding regulatory impacts - at least the non-profits I know. Again anyone with another opinion please chime in.
  10. It seems to me that you need to use two lists with a list of the pros and cons of this proposal. It can only be your decision and none of us can know what will be better or more interesting for you.
  11. As for me, Sociology is more interesting than Anthropology, but this should be your decision.
  12. Hi everybody! I am trying to figure out which of these options is better, and I was wondering if you had any opinions on this as I am really unsure. 1) Masters in Biomedicine at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden 2) Masters in Neuroscience at GSN-LMU Munich in Germany Ultimately, the goal is to do a PhD in neuroscience, maybe at one of these institutions or maybe in the US/UK. Both programs would allow me to complete research projects with their faculty, and in both places, there seems to be fascinating neuro research being done. I am particularly interested in translational neuroscience, would any of these programs be better suited for this? And would you say one is more known than the other? Thank you!
  13. Hi ! mine is english 🤷🏻‍♀️
  14. Please help me to decide and to identify more pros and cons for each scenario. Goal: Career change; Break into academia. Idealist plan: PhD in System Dynamics @ STERN or PhD in Neuroeconomics @ NYU Realist plan: Lab manager / Data analyst / Bioinformatician Scenario 1: MS in Information Systems @ Baruch College. Presential classes. $17,000 total (future) investment. Should take 1.5 years to finish. Scenario 2: MS in Bioinformatics @ University of Maine. Fully online. $21,000 total investment. Should take 1 to 2 years to complete. Background: I moved to the US in 2016. My husband is a scientist, and he got a position in the US. At 27, I had a pretty good mid-career corporate position in our home country, but the economy was falling apart and it wasn't worth to stay there. I hold a BS in mathematics and a graduate certificate in finance, and I had a pretty decent track of achievements in my home country. All of that fell apart in the US. I started a MS in Information Systems at Baruch College in 2017, but fell severely sick shortly after, leading to severe financial hardship. I had to drop from the college. I studied only one term, finished 6 credits with a insufferable 2.7 GPA, and had to withdrawn from the other 2 courses I inadvertently tried to do(but couldn't because of pain). The health issue is super relevant to the decision, so please bear with me: ended up, I have a genetic disorder and in my home country they just used to give intravenous opioids whenever I was in pain. I did not "fell" sick when I arrived in the US, I just lost access to my medical network and did not have any pain control. Now, I'm diagnosed, but I still don't have access to pain meds.... I have physical therapy twice a week and take anti-inflammatory, muscle relaxers and sleeping pills, plus manage the pain with Kratom (legal herbal tea). In January, we were finally granted permanent residency to the US and I can use FAFSA to go back to school. I'm averagely employed, earning about $50k/year in a position I do not cherish and I want to change. I've been helping my husband with his job for years, and honestly, I want the flexibility academia provides. I've done lots of data analysis for him and its def something I would be very happy doing as a professional. So here's the dilemma. Should I go back to Baruch? MIS @ Baruch pros: 1. Baruch is a some-what respected school of business; 2. I already started, and looks bad being a drop-out. 3. Good job market outlook, aligns with my background. 4. Might give me more leverage to pursue a PhD in System Dynamics at Stern, granted I manage to reverse the initial stain. MIS @ Baruch cons: 1. Because of my GPA, I'm not eligible to work-study, grants, or other benefits. 2. It will show the bad GPS and withdraws on my records after I graduate. 3. It's presential, so I will need accommodations to attend and may take longer to finish - because pain. 4. I want to work in academia, and in the short term I see no clear path from Baruch to academia. Maybe I'm shortsighted?? Bioinformatics @ UMaine Pros: 1. Fully online. I can take more classes at once, maybe even finish in a year. 2. Academia-focused institution. If I'm smart on how I network I can easily secure a research assistant position in a lab in collaboration with them. There are a few in NYC. 3. Its fun to do and I like it best. 4. No bad GPA/ withdrawn in my transcripts. Bioinformatics @ UMaine Cons: 1. Rural institution, I'm unsure about its reputation. I doubt I could use it to gain admittance to MIT. 2. Far from me, will be harder to network and I may end up anonymous to my professors. 3. Out of water fish trying to change careers. Uncertain transition. Thanks y'all.
  15. hi, thank you TMP for the helpful and detailed advices, will do so according to your suggestion ~
  16. Yesterday
  17. i got it, thank you for the info:)
  18. Hi all, I am one semester away from graduating with a double major in political science and English. I have some fantastic mentors who have pushed me to conduct research and present at conferences. So far, it's been a thrilling experience, and I have fallen deeply in love in rhetorical research. Recently, the conversations have turned toward what I want to do in the future, and I've decided that graduate school is how I want to move forward and spend my time. However, I cannot seem to get any of my mentors to give me any solid or consistent guidance on programs that fit my interests and suit my needs. After spending countless hours scouring the RSA graduate programs list, I am a bit overwhelmed to say the least. And now, I turn to the masses. What are the highest ranked schools for rhet/comp? Is there a reasonable expectation of tuition remission or GA-ships across the board? Should to apply to schools that have highly regarded faculty, or are there other considerations that are more important? I realize that the answer for some of these questions is probably, "it depends." Even so, I'd love to hear your thoughts. If it helps, I have a few schools on my radar, but I have no idea of their reputation; University of Washington and University of South Carolina are two that have come as suggestions. As of right now, my research interests include environmental rhetoric, political communications, and archival writing. I will take any and all advice that you are willing to give!
  19. I am seeing someone. Someone I knew for four years. He made a love declaration to me. He had been waiting for me for four years. I said yes. Falling in love during the pandemic was totally unexpected and not within my plans. It's not official yet and I am scared. He's scared too. But according to our closest friends, we're experiencing a beautiful story that has a lot of depth, respect and love. Something very strong and rare. I am going back to my hometown next week to see him again. This time as a potential lover, and not as a friend. And I am scared. Almost as if it was my first date or the first time I see him (although I've known him for four years and have seen him multiple times in the past years). I am both happy and scared.
  20. I am tired. I know it won't change anything to the situation. I know it's hard for everyone. But I need to vent/rant. I live on my own, two hours away from my hometown. I had moved for my first year of university and had always planned to move back to my hometown afterwards. But because of COVID-19, I have not seen my family and friends in person since March. I am quite an independant woman, and it was okay at the beginning (the first two months). But now, I am fed up to be honest. It impacts my motivation re: my comprehensive exam as well. I have low energy and feel like I'm stuck between my four walls. I can't even do the things I enjoy doing on my own (going to music concerts, watch independant movies at the local movie theater, going to music concerts, etc.). I can't study at the local library or café. I'm at home all day long. All my activities entails going to the grocery store, talking walks with music, and watching some webinars. And cleaning up my appartement. That's it. I speak with my friends and family through Zoom, phonecalls, Messenger, texts daily. But it is not the same thing has having a real human being in front of you or to get a hug. Plus, to my surprise, I fell in love with a man that loves me back during the pandemic (we knew each other for multiple years). He made a love declaration to me and I've responded back positively to it. But he's in my hometown. We speak over the phone daily, but we cannot see or touch each other. Falling in love has impacted my level of concentration. It,s a bit better now, but I still feel like my head is up in the clouds. And I am notorious for how focused I am. But I just can't focus. I think travelling is now allowed between Canadian provinces. I am going to take a shot at taking the train next week to go back to my hometown. Because I am going crazy and feel bored.
  21. When I was applying to programs, I found it most helpful to identify potential advisors by searching the authors of papers that I liked. This can be good not only because it connects you to potentially good advisors, but also gives you something to talk about with them (referencing their prior work is a great way to show you're serious). Another sure-fire way is to ask current anthropologists you know (could be professors, grad student friends, or undergrads at other institutions) if they know anyone doing work related to what you're interested in. Having a common connection is a great way to get your foot in the door. I am a biological anthropologist so can't say much about specific cultural anthropology methods. However, I would suggest that you consider the benefits of different types of advisors. For example, one that specializes in the methods you are interested in will obviously be able to help you learn the methods. However, an advisor that works in Colombia and Honduras will likely be able to connect you to many more people who do research there. I would say reach out to both types! There is certainly plenty of time to decide, and you will likely sadly talk to a decent number of people who just aren't interested in working with you and/or you realize your personalities aren't a good fit. Reach out to a lot of people and narrow from there.
  22. Hi all! I wanted to start a thread for prospective DrPH students applying before Dec 1 2020 for 2021 matriculation. I was browsing similar threads from previous application cycles and thought this would be helpful! I’m planning to apply to Johns Hopkins distance DrPH program. -MPH -East coast -I’ve worked in hospital epidemiology for 10 years, currently in a leadership role. Nice to meet you!
  23. I figured I'd start a gathering place for us quant folk, so hello! I'm a current MA student doing research in quant and I have a list of 12 programs so far. Once I email potential advisors, I'm sure that list will change. Interests include structural equation modeling and nonparametric analyses Who else is out there?
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