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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/12/2010 in all areas

  1. Wha...? I really can't figure out the tone of this post. Here's my jargon-free explanation: Basically, think of these threads as rooms. You enter a room where people you don't know are discussing something with a lot of personal relevance to everyone in the room as well as people outside of it, and interrupt it to ask a question completely and exclusively centered on you. Basically, that question seems to be: "I'm bad at math, and don't like it much. Can I thus be a literary scholar?" We all look at each other perplexed, because we have no idea (especially since we don't know you, much l
    2 points
  2. Your question, phrased many different ways has been seeking to discover whether or not your qualitative habits of inquiry fit within the English discipline. As there are many kinds of qualitative analysis, I'm simply saying I can't answer that question at all without having a better idea of the kind of project you're hoping to do in English, and your posts in this thread haven't given any indication of that. As long as your response continues to be variations on the same question with no more specificity indicated, how are we going to say? It would be more useful to know things like, what kind
    1 point
  3. @StrongFlatWhite.... What on earth? You're acting like a child and being deliberately obtuse. You have been asked several times to clarify what you mean by "qualitative niche" and have done nothing but mope about how no one is asking you directly. Sorry that the internet is not a role-playing game in which you are the main character? To respond to your comments/claims/questions that you have advanced here, quite concretely: First, the reason that people are talking about "methodological philosophies" is because that's how you figure out what quantitative and qualitative study means, what th
    1 point
  4. WorldMan

    Oxford or Yale?

    Definitely go with Yale if your goal is PhD in biological sciences. Labs are the same, and you will spend a lot of time there. Besides, life of a grad student is stressful enough, and you would not want to add to stress by living in unfamiliar surroundings. For all other experiences, just travel to Europe.
    1 point
  5. Very key point to make. When I asked about the qualitative/quantitative divide, I did so with an obvious bias, but I also did so wearing my newness to the field on my sleeve. I think I have found that the forum encourages me to ask questions about the field if for no other reason than most people give a lot of thought to the answers, and are on the whole pretty encouraging. That's cool. There is some hostility, some of which I can understand, some of which is a little harder for me to understand. I know that academia is filled with very strong opinions (and that I'm a key contributor to
    1 point
  6. Wow! So, I guess to answer my questions, yes, I am way off base and I am thinking wishfully. Um, I don't really know how to respond other than to reflect a little further. A lot of your comments are something I would agree with wholeheartedly, and seem to suggest that my preference for qualitative is hypocritical. That may be. That's actually what I was wondering aloud, here. On the other hand, there is a bit of a rant here that doesn't really even address my post at all. TS Eliot? Ivies? Merit? I've provided no meaningful commentary on any of these subjects - I've just read
    1 point
  7. A brief response, because I'm not going to get placed anywhere unless I write these papers! Anyway: 1. A caveat: I'm fortunate enough to be in a program that has historically placed at institutions I'd be happy to work at, that has a well-structured pre-professionalization program in place, and that has professors who are knowledgeable about and, through their work, help shape, the current state of the field. As a result, I don't feel the need to think about placement all the time. Instead, I feel safe trusting that if I do what counts as quality work, I'll be well-positioned for the
    1 point
  8. Summit_Bid

    Red Ink!!!

    An old Chinese legend says it's bad luck to write a name in red ink. They say that the person whose name is written in bad ink will soon encounter very grave misfortunes. I work for a Chinese company and write names in red ink all the time when no one is looking and nothing bad has happended. Don't sweat it.
    1 point
  9. I'm probably going to offend someone by saying this, but given rough comparability between KSU and Hawaii, I would much rather spend the better part of my twenties in Honolulu, HI, than Manhattan, KS.
    1 point
  10. I don't understand the qualitative vs quantitative debate when it comes to this discipline, and even less your response to it. You seem to be throwing in everything including the kitchen sink, and perhaps trying to impress us with your knowledge of theory. I'll only respond to the TS Eliot/noblese oblige part since I'm the one who wrote that. I didn't think I had to spell out exactly what I meant by that because I think pretty much everyone understands that the noblese oblige thing really didn't mean much to the poor. It seems clear that throughout history the wealthy have not done that m
    1 point
  11. Historiogaffe

    Which MA program?

    With these decisions, there really isn't an objective point of view, per se – as these replies are evidencing. So, if you'd like my subjective two cents, I would go for Option B. As strokeofmidnight mentioned, it's still funded – do you think the grands you'd be adding onto your debt would be manageable? The "follow the money" advice is good, but these are both offering you money, and I tend to take that advice as "don't drop yourself into unmanageable, decades-to-pay-off debt" – not as a code for, "whichever school offers you more money will clearly be a better fit and experience for you."
    1 point
  12. There are worse things than waiting for 4/15. You could be this guy:
    1 point
  13. Phone them tomorrow and use this line:
    1 point
  14. Well said. Distrusting quantitative data is what makes you a critical thinker. I have really internalized a preference for qualitative over quantitative and has a lot to do with my decision to switch fields. Most social sciences are taking a hard turn towards qualitative, and I firmly believe this to be a mistake. At first, I took a look at my GRE scores and writing, and just thought I wasn't cut out for anything involving numbers (words, however, I can do!). So in the beginning, my switch was purely based on what I thought was a play to my strengths - a personal utilitarian method that
    1 point
  15. I’ve been following this thread with interest, and thanks to soxpuppet for gracefully extracting the most productive part of that other conversation! I’ll repeat what everyone has said, which is that this sort of exchange is exactly what excites me about entering grad school and academia in general – it's thrilling to get to call all of you people colleagues! Which has sort of made me think about forums like this one, and the role of the internet and online communities, which has been mentioned in passing. Financial disadvantage is always going to be the big one that affects and/or determin
    1 point
  16. My short answer: now. Better sooner than you'd like than later than you need! But you might want to gauge the area's employment rates and opportunities in that field, to decide how soon to look. Also, if your boyfriend can freelance, he might not need to be in such a hurry.
    1 point
  17. rising_star

    Down to the wire!

    Serious question: Will having a degree with the exact right focus open doors for you that a slightly less focused degree with 2 years of additional work experience cannot? Like, will the School 2 or 3 degrees help you get a job that the School 1 degree can/will not? If the answer is no, then I think you already know what the right answer for your career is. Then you just have to decide whether to prioritize location or your career. A master's is 2 years, maybe 3. But if you choose something now that will not improve or will narrow your career options, that can follow you for years to come.
    1 point
  18. There's some intrinsic things about academia that I think select for liberals, or promote liberalism. 1. It's not the highest-paying field in the world. That's going to select for people who don't put the highest priority on money. 2. It's creative work, done on a fairly free time schedule. That means that you aren't earning your pay on a 9-to-5 job. That changes your attitude to money. You're less likely to think "I earned every penny of this with my own drudgery." You're more likely to feel lucky (rather than justified) to be paid for playing with your brain. Since producti
    1 point
  19. I agree, though I didn't not submit my scores because they were bad (I had 680Q, 700V, 5.5A and i'm in the social sciences), but because i couldn't even take them before the deadline. Am I now screwed?
    1 point
  20. I like how I seem to have started a sociologist brawl. I can't speak to the influence of binge drinking, casual encounters, and frat parties on the development of political ideology. But I can say that if you are one of those liberal academic wannabes, this week has been seriously depressing. Between whimpering about the Massachusetts election and dissolving in angst over the Supreme Court decision, I've barely had time for my regular what-if-I-don't-get-in mindgames.
    1 point
  21. I'm just not sold on the type casting idea. The survey data is indisputable, the GSS is the best representative sample of the American pop. But I think there may be a better theoretical explanation. Education itself has a way of liberalising individuals. I think the causality might be opposite, maybe higher educations lead to liberal attitudes. You can't tell from the survey, cause the GSS doesn't use panel data. I bet the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (might have then name wrong in sequence...) would yeild interesting results. Tracking political identity over time to see if the
    1 point
  22. Hi folks! I'm willing to apply for a PhD in Bioengineering this year. My top wish is UC Berkeley. What would you think my chances are given my profile? I graduated in Germany with a MSc in Computer Science from one of their best universities. My GPA is strong (I have not calculated it still, because it's a bit complicated, but it should be above 3.5). My research and work experience is: - 2 years in a Biotech company doing bioinformatics research. - 6 months as research scholar at the university in Germany working on a bioinformatics project. - 6 months at UPenn as research sc
    0 points
  23. timuralp

    Laptops

    Yea, consider the above post, and the quality argument goes out the window. It's pretty similar hardware in all the machines. If you want "tougher" cases, check out the toughbook. If you want shiny, go for mac. The "smart" opinion is not very well defined here, and neither is the "quality". I'm really not sure which quality you're referring to.
    0 points
  24. Anyone get selected for VCU Photo? I was curious about something.
    0 points
  25. I want to first say that I lost sight of nothing: when I began this maelstrom of qualitative/quantitative, it had nothing to do with rankings and everything to do with the field in terms of methodology. Granted, I took a quote from rankings context, but my post that fired off GK's lame-ass vitriol was a redirection and a synthesis. To wit: I ask about our field. Now getting to assumptions and original points and underlying assumptions, let me please quote from my brilliant wife's MA thesis in medical anthropology, an admitted social science that struggles between qualitative and quanti
    0 points
  26. Again, it's not a matter of how "privilege" improves your chances, but how the very nature of the system is one that reproduces these systems of privilege. You note that 'merely possessing certain privileges is not a guarantee of success." You're precisely right here, but they are in most cases pre-conditions of success. Certainly not all people from the top 5% of income in the US get "in" to grad school - not all of them want to, nor are they all qualified. But I would make a significant wager that an exponentially greater percentage of people from the top 5% of the US get accepted, and at hi
    0 points
  27. You should have a native English speaker read this and offer suggestions. You are missing direct articles in a number of places and your wording is often quite stilted. Also, you should lose the first line entirely. Become much more specific.
    -1 points
  28. <br /><br /><br /> With the proviso that I know nothing about the topic at hand, from where I'm sitting it looks like someone just got owned.
    -1 points
  29. Tell them, unless you think that theres a possibility you might get two sources of funding. That would be neat.
    -1 points
  30. Not to mention that someone else on this forum got 20 grand from them this year, so perhaps they aren't actually that crunched...
    -1 points
  31. <br /><br /><br /> May I ask how you made it to the US from a small 3rd world village?
    -1 points
  32. Good luck with Princeton! I'm in my own waitlist purgatory over here ...
    -1 points
  33. So glad my GA is going to be as high as it is, 35k =)
    -1 points
  34. Just wanted to wish everyone who's still in my boat of waiting on a wait list and a happy weekend. FYI the latest Rochester post is just another troll...I'm still playing the waiting game!
    -1 points
  35. It strikes me as indicative of the sort group circle-jerk taking place in this thread to create this opposition between quantitative and qualitative analysis and then congratulate your field for being the "only one" to resist it - a rudimentary investigation beyond the very superficial demonstrates that what you appear to be upset with is a prevailing orthodoxy of opinions that makes claims go unchallenged, and not a strict qualitative/quantitative distinction. Then, you make a straw man of quantitative data while freezing both "methods" in time. Look at the outrage that developed in the wake
    -1 points
  36. Hey All -- Though accepted elsewhere, I was waitlisted for my top choice, Fletcher, and am meeting with the Admissions Committee this coming week in an attempt to upgrade my status to a full admit, either for Fall 2010 or Spring 2011. Beyond addressing what I perceive as any gaps in my profile that weren't addressed in my initial application, does anyone have any advice to share on what to say to the Admissions staff? For current or accepted Fletcher students, what about your/your application do you think caught their eye? My stats are all well within range or above range, but I am on the y
    -1 points
  37. Has anyone applied to the Boston University Off Campus Program and received a decision yet? It seems that they are extremely disorganized and keep changing their policies. Initially, I was told that applications submitted prior to the March 1st deadline would receive an admission decision by the first week in April. When I followed up this week, i was told that I would hear from them by April 30th at the latest. I submitted my application mid February and never did receive an email stating that my packet was complete. Confirming that all my materials were received involved 3-4 phonecalls at le
    -1 points
  38. Thanks, Sox. I think I'll take that as my cue . The way I do conversation is perhaps a little different. It's really interesting to note how others may engage a question while simultaneously continuing "the original discussion" (which thread shall I trace backward?). That's a neat trick! Where I live on planet earth, I ask questions for the sole purpose of getting answers to them. Also, thanks that my question isn't entirely off topic! I really appreciate your approval. Next time I'll look for more meshiness, that seems to be key in question-asking, an art that clearly English maj
    -5 points


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