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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/11/2012 in all areas

  1. pinkrobot

    Name Dropping in SOP

    I think there was a thread earlier this year where someone set up a poll to ask who spoke to professors ahead of time, who didn't, and what their results were. I think that thread showed that there didn't seem to be much correlation between the categories; relatedly, I also personally know a lot of people who didn't contact professors and wouldn't change a thing about their choice, and a lot of people who did contact professors and wouldn't change a thing about their choice, and a lot of people who did one or the other and wishes they'd done the other one. Probably this is up to each person an
    2 points
  2. I'm reapplying again this year too. This will be my third time applying. My first round I was completly unprepared - working FT and completing my thesis. I had no idea what I was in for or the time to really complete my applications. In addition, my GRE scores SUCKED. Last year I made it onto 3 waitlists out of 5 programs. I retook the GRE (increasing by 40 some percentile verbal and got a 6 on the writing as compared to 4.5) and revamped my SOP and writing sample. I think last year was a matter of number of schools applied to. I also think that it was my SOP -- I don't think I was as
    1 point
  3. Thanks everyone for your input... It's be a tough decision, but I have decided to defer for a year, reapply for more fellowships and programs. And already, other opportunities are presenting themselves for the next year... The disappointment is still there, but I have some peace of mind. So thanks a lot!!
    1 point
  4. If you want an industry job as a software engineer, I don't think it matters. Write good code (and pass interviews) and companies will be happy to hire you. No one will care much about your research (e.g. all those PhDs who go to google don't work in their former research area). If you want an industry research position, then of course it matters more. The key question here is: does your research have an industrial application? I'm pretty sure some companies hire all sorts of researchers (e.g. you can probably work in almost anything at MSR) but in general I don't know the ratios. A priori,
    1 point
  5. I heard conflicting opinions on this matter as well. Like Eigen, I'm also not my advisor's first graduate student (but the second), so far my experience is both good and bad, but I consider this common -- nobody is perfect, advisors are learning how to be a good advisor, especially these young faculty. I second what Dal PhDer's comment, that how well you get along with your advisor depends on multiple factors. I don't think you need to avoid joining a young faculty's lab, or thinking they won't provide you with good job prospect. Rather, put 'people' before 'science'. If you do join a new
    1 point
  6. Ah man, I clicked on this thread, ready to wax existential about the question seemingly posed in the title, and answer it as a legit question. Little did I realize:
    1 point
  7. Yep, this will be the first week of classes:
    1 point
  8. Amazon sells pretty much everything and has a program with free two-day shipping and cheap 1-day shipping called Prime. I think you can get a free trial, but it's only $40/year for anyone with a .edu email address. If it's not absolutely vital that you have all items the day that you arrive, sign up for one of these accounts and order them about 1-2 days before you arrive (sometimes items come sooner than expected and it could be a huge pain if something is delivered to an address where you aren't living yet). That's the cheapest option I can think of.
    1 point
  9. Your "field of research" is far too vague for anyone to give you any concrete advice.
    1 point
  10. I'm not sure how you found this site, but this really isn't the right place to ask about this. I would suggest going to your campus tutoring center, or going to your professor for assistance. It's also never a bad idea to make friends with classmates and have someone to practice with or review your work.
    1 point
  11. Could be any number of reasons; intentionally blowing you off probably isn't it. I would send a kindly reminder, or if she has a phone call her (enough time has elapsed between email and phone call). When possible I phone people; email is great for a first contact, but since the email has become a bit more ubiquitous than the phone in dealing with these kinds of issues in academics, it's too easy to ignore or mistakenly pass over. A quickie phone call to her or an admin in her dept. leaving a messag (or inquiring if she is on campus) will do far more to get the result you want.
    1 point
  12. This. Definitely. And don't be afraid to use your resources in your current program! Generally, your profs will have friends or connections in other programs that will, at the very least, give schools to rule out. They might recommend schools that you'd never considered. I'd also like to add using conferences to actually meet POIs in person--big conferences, like NCA, will have both grad fairs and receptions, and if you have a narrowed-down list by then, you can go to panel presentations and actually see what people are doing right now. One of the faults with looking through publications is
    1 point
  13. Hmm...seeds. Are they roundish with spots on them? If so, you might not want to grow them. Or you might
    1 point
  14. Although MyFile at York changed to "reviewed-unsuccessful" and I subsequently received a form letter in the mail saying pretty much the same thing, I e-mailed the School of Social Work and asked for confirmation. After all, they had previously told me that I was on the waiting list. They promptly replied and told me that my application was not successful, etc. A week later? I get another e-mail saying no, actually it appears that I am on the waiting list. Really these people should give up on Social Work and go into drama. They'd be great at writing farce.
    1 point
  15. Eigen

    This is how I react...

    Ah, the lengthening coffee line- truly the bane of graduate students everywhere! My university built a coffee shop into the breezeway in our building, almost directly under my lab. It's great during the summer, but it's busy as all get out during the semester. Especially right at the start. I swear most undergraduates seem to live on food from there, I'm not sure where they get the money. On the flip side, though, they open an hour earlier and stay open 5 hours later during the semester, so I don't have to rush down at 5 to get my evening caffeine. And for us, we get more undergradu
    1 point
  16. I couldn't agree more. In the end, I think it comes down to this and whether or not the advisor is good at what they do. Being good encompasses a range of qualities: being able to effectively get a student through their degree, being able to adapt to students' personalities and learning styles, being open for seeing your mistakes and learning from them, and encouraging a peer-peer communication between advisor and student- these are just some of the qualities. I also think that it comes down to personal preference too...some students may love the way one professors is, while another might n
    1 point
  17. Thanks everyone I feel quite cheered up!
    1 point
  18. Duna

    Dating younger men

    I think this whole thread is simply adorable. Girl, I wish you all the best! And if it doesn't work out, there'll be others...
    1 point
  19. R Deckard

    Dating younger men

    Going to disagree with you here.
    1 point
  20. The best possible advice you can get
    1 point
  21. I dunno - I'd be super nervous too at that age attending an overseas program.
    1 point
  22. These are natural feelings that all students have throughout their grad school journey. You will have them before you start, and right until the end when you walk up on that stage and collect your diploma. I think these feelings and doubts are what make us successful at what we do. We always feel we are not equipped enough to make it, so we try extra hard to be successful, which really pays off. Graduate school is an exciting experience where you will be met with happy, sad, challenging, inspiring, and exciting times. If you were not prepared and equipped for graduate school, you would not
    1 point
  23. Pas

    pre departure freak out

    One. Day. At. A. Time.
    1 point
  24. wildviolet

    Dating younger men

    Yeah, I'd like to know if he's single, too! I'll find out in a few weeks... Yes, what you described was my situation. Something that I should add, though, is that my ex is bipolar and he never shared that with me directly. He finally told me about it when we were on the verge of separating. I read all I could about bipolar disorder, and it all started to make sense--his bizarre energy levels, moods, violent outbursts, uncontrollable temper, and charismatic personality. If he had told me about it truthfully, when we first met, I probably wouldn't have stayed with him let alone marry him (
    1 point
  25. Sigaba

    Dating younger men

    MOO, the issue is not the age difference, but the context -- a first-year doctoral student in your field. Will you be able to stake out enough space/time for yourself if a relationship develops? Will you be able to step back from the personal to focus on the academic side of your interaction with him or he with you? (For example, one of you pulls punches out of concern for the romantic aspect of the relationship.) And then there's the issue of your personal privacy. The amount of, ah, comparing of notes, that can go on in a department is something you will have to experience to believe.
    1 point
  26. imonedaful

    Dating younger men

    Agree with the poster above. Three years is a wash. You should look at men as being in your age bracket, not younger/ older. A few years one way or the other does not drastically change a person maturity level. Make your decision based off on personality factors. Older does not necessarily mean wiser. It actually makes more sense from an athropologic standpoint for women to marry younger men since we typically live longer them. haha
    1 point
  27. ktel

    Dating younger men

    ^ God somebody ban him already... To the OP, I would hardly consider a 3 year age difference significant, especially at your age. My mom is 6 years older than my dad, they met when she was about your age.
    1 point
  28. About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a hea
    1 point
  29. Sparrowing

    Vancouver, BC

    I grew up in Vancouver so I thought I'd offer a few tips. 1. Despite what others have said in this forum, public transit in Vancouver is TERRIBLE. I can say this because I've travelled extensively and have lived in various cities in North America and Europe. So if you don't have a car and want to avoid long commutes, try to live near one of the major transit corridors. Also consider cycling if you're going to UBC. 2. For people planning to attend UBC, the West Side of Vancouver is beautiful but expensive, so allocate lots of time for apartment hunting. I wouldn't recommend cycling from
    1 point
  30. I have my test on September 14th. Let's talk. alf10087@gmail.com
    -1 points
  31. wildviolet

    Dating younger men

    OK, I cannot believe I'm actually going to ask, but I really want to know what the GradCafe community thinks, so here goes... what do women think about dating younger men? And, what do men think about dating older women? Now, I don't mean cougars chasing after 20-somethings. Here's the situation: When I went on my campus visit, I met several current students. One of them was a very cute first-year doctoral student. We had a great hour long conversation--the kind that you wish would never stop. Afterwards, a few minutes of web searching revealed that he graduated three years after I did.
    -1 points
  32. I am taking the GRE towards the end of September 2012; perhaps we can try to study together. Email me at subravenkat [at] gmail [dot] com
    -1 points
  33. Ok guys, need your feedback on this one! A PhD student at my university has entered in a consensual romantic relationship with an undergraduate student. There is no supervisory/TA dynamics involved watsoever. The school does not have an official or unofficial policy about relationships between faculty and students. We have looked at the policies of some other schools, but they vary greatly. So what's your take - should the PhD student voluntarily disclose the information, and if so, to whom (Chair, who also happens to be supervisor, Dean of faculty, Dean of Grad studies, other?) Cheerio!
    -1 points
  34. I noticed there was a fall 2013 forum alive and kicking in the History section and a pang of jealousy came over me. Is anyone else out there gearing up for the Fall 2013 admissions cycle? I am finishing up my masters degree this fall and seem to be at a loss on the best possible approach. When are we supposed to contact POIs? Are we required to contact POIs? I feel like I'm trying to figure out how to join a secret society and the stress is already getting to me!! I'm slightly OCD, so I have written (and ripped up) far too many "academic game plans" and I think an electronic forum might be a
    -1 points


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