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  1. I wasn't saying I didn't see your point at all Arcanen, but you don't seem to want to acknowledge that it isn't the only way of looking at the issue. I was trying to be honest and diplomatic, but I feel like you're judging and scolding me for explaining my situation and perspective. I'm not hiding behind the fact that I'm an introvert; I'm aware of that fact and trying to take steps to make sure it doesn't stop me from having a great experience in grad school. I have lived in my own apartment for four years and I really love it and know it works for me, so I'm planning to continue with that ty
    3 points
  2. The writing sample should be your best piece of academic writing, whatever that may be. I've heard of people writing a new sample entirely from scratch if they didn't have a piece that lined up with their stated interests in their Statement of Purpose. It can be whatever you make it, though I would recommend if you are going to do a new writing sample, you start it as early as possible and have it finished by around mid-August so you have plenty of time to go back, revise, and tweak it before you start sending your applications out.
    2 points
  3. So let's say that you have multiple research interests in different categories (IR, CP, PT or AP)...How did you decided which one you would: A. Write about in your SOP B. Study Further in graduate school C. Write your dissertation on I have structured this question so pretty much everyone can respond somehow.
    2 points
  4. As long as there are Christian colleges, Bible will not be a bad choice. But then you'll probably get fired for challenging fundamentalism.
    2 points
  5. Converge them on a single plane! I have structured the answer so that pretty much of your questions are responded to.
    2 points
  6. PROFILE: Type of Undergrad Institution: R1 state school, but likely not highly regarded outside of the region Major(s)/Minor(s): International Relations Undergrad GPA: 3.9ish Type of Grad: Public Policy (combined program with undergrad) Grad GPA: 3.7ish GRE: 166V, 161Q, 5W Any Special Courses: One grad intel studies course, 2 course Phd stat sequence audited, relevant methodology courses from graduate degree, relevant study abroad Letters of Recommendation: Assistant prof/mentor I RA'd for during undergrad with similar research focus, two non-academics in research-oriented careers I've
    2 points
  7. jmu

    Signing emails with "Best"

    I say "best." On a related note: http://theweek.com/article/index/241210/digital-etiquette-what-your-email-sign-off-says-about-you
    2 points
  8. I knew there was a reason I hung with Catholic schools so long....
    1 point
  9. Kuriakos

    Foreign PhDs

    It's sort of an open secret that UK profs often end up accepting more Americans for the money and consequently end up supervising more people than would be considered acceptable in the US. At least, that is what a former prof who has worked in both countries told me.
    1 point
  10. Both, if you can. I have been doing this with German for the past month without too much trouble. Spend like an hour a day on the GRE and then continue with the Latin. Hell, even spend half an hour and it will help. I have been using this for the verbal: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1479216925/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Also, this is one of the better/comprehensive sets I have used: http://www.amazon.com/Manhattan-Strategy-Guides-Edition-Instructional/dp/1935707981/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1370543293&sr=8-1&keywords=manhattan+gre The latter includes a verb
    1 point
  11. If I were you, I would 1. start volunteering in CDB. keep your research experience grow. i doubt that it is a good thing to have an academic / research gap for a long time. 2. start looking for LORs immediately. Informed them about programs that you are planning to apply, etc. Keep them in touch with a monthly / bimonthly updates, until the application cycle begins (which should be sometime around late August - early October, depends on the programs). 3a. start to look for schools and programs that you want to apply. Look at those CDB programs and see if any PI's research matches your in
    1 point
  12. Stolpher (or others currently attending) -- Could you please share a bit about your average daily routine and what patterns you've established that have made you a successful grad student?
    1 point
  13. I think it depends on how you ask the recommender. I had two recommendations from professors, and one from my (non-research) internship supervisor who did not hold a PhD. I asked the two professors to write about my research ability, and asked my internship supervisor to write about my work ethic. It worked out really well. That being said, I think you should try to have professors, advisors, or PhD-holders as your recommenders. However, if you're in a situation like mine, where a non-academic recommender knows you better than a professor, it's not a bad idea to ask for a non-academic lett
    1 point
  14. I don't think you should worry too much.... there's lots of other cylons out there for you to meet!
    1 point
  15. electric

    MSc in Geophysics

    Hanyuye, I was a physics major, then civil engineering MS, now geophysics phd student. Keep in mind that petroleum engineering is very specialized. While you're surely capable enough from a math/science perspective, there would be a lot of catching up to do in other things, and many grad departments aren't flexible about this. Civil engineering, on the other hand, is very broad, and I was able to do research that could have easily been called applied physics. When I think of applied geophysics, along the lines of your interests, I think of a few other schools in addition to the ones yo
    1 point
  16. I agree with Condivi! The only thing I would add is: submit your "absolutely best" piece of writing. Last year I had the opportunity to speak with several professors in the top programs in the US, and though they offered a range of opinions regarding the content of writing samples (in terms of area of research, methodology, etc), they all agreed that one should ALWAYS send their best work - even if that means submitting a paper you wrote on "medieval manuscripts," though you are actually interested in contemporary art. Some POIs mentioned that they actually prefer the latter since they be
    1 point
  17. In case anyone is curious, 28 out of the top 50 programs (rankings according to the US News) DO NOT require the subject test. It might be 30 out of 50 but two of the websites I was trying to look at weren't working. I'm still in the process of deciding which programs to apply to, but I have a feeling that there's plenty to choose from that don't require the test. I'm not taking it as of this point--unless there's a school that I absolutely must go to. We'll see...
    1 point
  18. Good for you, nehs! You never know until you try it. I thought I would love teaching (because I loved school as a student). Well... a decade later, and I discovered that I don't love teaching as much as research. Actually a balance would be nice, but I couldn't do much research as a K-12 classroom teacher. I think being in academia will allow me to do research on something that I'm passionate about (education, schooling, teaching, learning) and still engage in teaching but to a lesser degree. I've just recently decided that I do want to aim for R1 institutions, not because of academic prestige
    1 point
  19. condivi

    Fall 2014 Applications

    Ah, I see. Ideally, your writing sample would have something to do with your proposed area of research, even if only tangentially. So, for example, if you wanted to work on twentieth-century art, it would be best to submit a paper on a twentieth-century topic. Even better would be if the paper spoke directly to your specialty and your approach. If that's not possible--and it isn't always--submit your best work, and explain in your personal statement how and why you've changed your area of focus, and, if possible, try to show how your previous work as embodied in your sample has informed your c
    1 point
  20. AdventureFinder

    Ithaca, NY

    Buying Property in Ithaca: To reintroduce an topic touched upon a couple years earlier in this thread, I'd like to know specifically about Ithaca's real estate market at this time. I will start my PhD this fall and expect to be near campus for 5 - 7 years, possibly traveling for fieldwork for one or two of those years. I've heard about Ithaca being a desirable location to own property, and about it's recent transition to a "seller's market". Does anyone have insight into buying a home there? Is it economically sound at this time? Is it easy to rent? Is the task of purchas
    1 point
  21. Check it out. All the schools are here: http://www.aucc.ca/canadian-universities/study-programs/
    1 point
  22. Not as far as I know- but from what I've observed art history programs tend to be disproportionately peopled with female students- at least at the graduate level
    1 point
  23. Meetup.com is pretty cool for meeting people who are into some interest or activity. So you could network with other people interested in what you're studying, or you could meet other people for activities or social gatherings.
    1 point
  24. I do appreciate the suggestion of stepping out of my comfort zone and living in a residential school, and (if not for the cat issue) would agree that maybe I shouldn't immediately write off that option. However, I know that for me, and people like me, it would not be the most fitting option and it doesn't just have to do with a comfort zone. Being introverted means you generally lose energy from being around groups of people and feel more energized when you are able to spend time alone. This doesn't mean you don't need human contact, but it does mean that you need space and alone time to thriv
    1 point
  25. TMP

    Fall 2014 Applicants

    @oseirus None of my fields relate to diplomatic history (though my dissertation does deal with it). Remember, transnational doesn't necessarily mean diplomatic or military history. You can go transnational in social history when you examine networks (social, economic, labor, activism, etc) and migrations. My primary focus is naturally transnational in nature (though much of it has been Europe-centric). I'm not really into world or global history though I do like to examine history through global perspective. PM me if you have any more questions.
    1 point
  26. Thank you so much!!!! I am excited! I probably shouldn't say it, but I think that this is one of the best, most supportive threads on this forum! All of you are awesome!
    1 point
  27. I thought about it when I moved for my PhD program but, the graduate housing isn't a "residential college" with a common dining area, it's set up as apartments. And, it would've been $150 more per month (not counting having to pay for on campus parking for my car) to live in a 4 person graduate apartment than it was to live a mile from campus in a house with two roommates. There are lots of reasons why people don't choose to live in graduate housing, whether they be personality, cost, the quality of the housing (lackluster in many places), or otherwise. And while you don't have to accept them,
    1 point
  28. There are obviously a lot of ways to answer this depending on what one is interested in. American Christianity comes with very different prospects than either NT or theology, though there's some overlap. In my department, 40% or so of students study American religions (and most of those American Catholicism.) None have any interest in jobs at religiously affiliated schools. I, on the other hand, would be willing to take a job just about anywhere that would have me--as long as I could sign the statement of faith in good conscience! Point is, it's hard to compare subfields within RS. But I c
    1 point
  29. a shortened version of may the best of luck be with you - similar to may the force be with you. I think I'll start writing "Best of Force" now, that sounds good
    1 point
  30. I fail to see the problem.
    1 point
  31. I don't have book recommendations, per se, but I thought you might want to consider taking a Yale open course or something from Coursera over the summer. Yale's open English courses has an introductory literary theory, and getting some theory in your background might be really helpful. Bonus: you can do the whole thing on your own schedule. Here is their website: http://oyc.yale.edu/english
    1 point
  32. Everyone here is so much nicer than me. I must be taking crabby pills. As a PhD student who teaches - it sounds like a nightmare for your profs. You said you F-d up, but now are trying to hunt down any point you can find or negotiate. What happens when you find every legit point and come up a little short? I would hate having a student putting me in that spot. Second, a B- average would be on the cusp of failing out of grad school where the work will be much harder. So you might want to find a more successful strategy to assure doing well if you get in.
    1 point
  33. I hate to break it to you, but clinical psych PhDs and PsyD are brutally competitive. I would strongly suggest prepping for your verbal as well. . You're at the 4% for math and 15% for verbal. I suggest you aim for 50% in both, which require scores in the 150s.
    1 point
  34. PROFILE: Type of Undergrad Institution: Top private university Major(s)/Minor(s): Political Theory Undergrad GPA: 3.57 Type of Grad: MA in the social sciences Grad GPA: 3.82 GRE: Q710/V670/5.5 Any Special Courses: mostly advanced theory courses with some qualitative methods coursework Letters of Recommendation: three tenured profs (although I really don't think the rank of the profs matters as much as the degree to which they can speak to your interests and skills). Research Experience: aside from working as an RA for a prof in an unrelated field, none Teaching Experience: none Su
    1 point
  35. This is a poor reason to apply to a purely biology PhD in my opinion. It's a common misconception that bioengineering is the same as bioMEDICAL engineering, which it really is not. In practice, there is little difference in the research you'll be able to do in any of these majors. It just depends on your interests and what projects/labs you decide to go into. The main difference will probably just be in your classes and how easy it will be get in to the program. You can go into an engineering major like BioE and it doesn't have to have anything to do with devices. I have a bioE background,
    1 point
  36. I think this thread is only for profiles for future applicants. If you have a question, you should make your own thread.
    1 point
  37. First of all, Welcome!!!! Secondly, of course it's a good sign. Dare I say great sign? One thing I'm starting to realize is that faculty in grad programs are extremely busy! If you received an interview and a nice "long" letter (MY GOD WHAT I WOULDN'T DO FOR A NICE LONG LETTER!!!) Sorry, focusing on you. Then that means they are very interested in you and that is amazing news. I'm so glad you shared it. We need good vibes. I'm happy for you. This process is like the long line in the supermarket. It is super frustrating and you just want it to be over. But as long as the line is movin
    1 point
  38. 1) definitely budget well for first few months. moving, getting an apartment, buying textbooks, and waiting until the end of the month for your first paycheck sucks. hard. 2) you will have less time than you think. even though you've been warned that it's a lot of work, it's still more work than you think it is. get used to 60+ hours of work a week. 3) you'll have to schedule your fun time. i hate planning my fun, but without doing that, it turns out i never have time for fun. at a certain point, you need to accept that you're not going to finish X tonight and just go grab a beer. 4)
    1 point
  39. this thread is discriminatory against people with sub-2.0 gpas!!
    -1 points
  40. I feel like I need to make a thread for 4.0 undergrads with no acceptances to balance things. (charter member)
    -1 points
  41. Depends on your career goals. If you think you would like an academic position, then it's important to go to a top 10-15 place and the best path into those places might be via an MS. Otherwise a lower-ranked PhD where you could gain direct entry might be sufficient.
    -1 points
  42. Hi, Is anyone else planning to apply to Baruch - Zicklin's P/T MBA program? Or, better yet are you an alumni? Any inside details would be most appreciated. I plan to visit the school next month but want to get a feel for the school culture. The price attracts me to the school not to mention that it is located right here in Manhattan. Thanks so much!
    -1 points
  43. I'm not talking about graduate housing in general (as you say, most graduate housing is just a collection of apartments that happen to be majority student occupied), and I recognise that many universities don't have residential colleges among their graduate housing options (which is unfortunate for such schools and students). That said, I do think there are some advantages to standard graduate housing over leasing an apartment in a non-affiliated apartment building and especially a house with regards to meeting new people, but that depends on the areas demographics. I was being fac
    -1 points
  44. hashslinger

    Am I Okay?

    Thanks for sharing! When you have students of your own, you'll be on the receiving end of the very same sentiment. Best of luck.
    -1 points
  45. I recently turned down my offer for TWU's M.A. in Sociology. I am still awaiting results for the M.S. in Applied Cognition and Neuroscience at UT-Dallas. With this being said, I figured the worst case scenario is, I don't get into the M.S. program, I enroll in an introductory algebra class, study well and hard for the GRE and retake the test sometime in November. I scored a 4.5 on the analytic essay portion, a 137 on the math and a 142 on the verbal. This was my first time taking the GRE (I am very happy with my essay score). I figured, I lack algebra skills in general, I didn't take it in hig
    -1 points
  46. Graduate residential colleges generally aren't like in undergrad, the vast majority of them have one person per room; you get the benefits of living in a community while still having some space that is yours alone. I used to think exactly the same thing. Very private person, couldn't deal with it, didn't want to deal with it etc. Then I tried it and had the absolute best time of my life. Doing something outside of your comfort zone doesn't mean you're forever uncomfortable, it means that the size of your comfort zone increases. This is an example where such an increase in your comfor
    -2 points
  47. The reason I'm so adamant about this is precisely because I myself am introverted. Your assumption that it's impossible to have time alone or recharge just isn't true; you still have your own room. Thriving as an introvert in a residential college is very much possible. It is about comfort zone, because while being introverted is totally fine, introverted people too often use it as an excuse to avoid things (that are much more to do with their own comfort zones than any unchangeable introversion nature) that scare them. You want to know how to push yourself and be more socially ac
    -2 points


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