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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/14/2013 in all areas

  1. Never to late too join the dark side!
    3 points
  2. I would check with an administrator or your advisor first. The information on the website might not be current, or else you might be an exception to some of the stated requirements. Enrolling onto a course at a new school without consulting anyone could lead - in the worse-case scenario - to getting enrolled on the wrong courses and needing the administrators to do extra legwork to sort out the issue. That would count as getting off to a bad start!
    2 points
  3. Sure thing! Unfortunately, our first offer didn't go through. Fortunately, we had a second house we really liked, so we are waiting to hear back. Turns out, obsessively watching HGTV doth not a real estate expert make. Edit: WE GOT A HOUSE! In Washington DC! Wow. Just, wow.
    2 points
  4. We recently received the email below from our International Students Office. I know pretty much the same email went out to students at other schools; this is effective immediately and should also affect new students who are beginning their education in the Fall (of course you don't need the documents proving current enrollment that are mentioned below, if you're entering for the first time!). I don't think there is anything to worry about, but make travel plans accordingly: have any connections outside the US so you reach the US at your final destination, or leave enough time for a connect
    1 point
  5. Is this essay a formality or is this class competitive so you need to invest serious effort into this? Could you (informally) ask around? If the class is required, I bet this is just a formality. In case it's a serious requirement, I'd stick to the bare essentials - you need to take this class to fulfill a language requirement; you work on X, specifically on X.1 and X.2 and you will need the language skills to do Y and Z and work on question X.3. I don't think you need to be too imaginative here.
    1 point
  6. Sometimes I think it is best to avoid outside sources for some application help. For basics things such as sending tests scores and deadlines you can look it up but when it comes to the fuzzy part of the application process I think you should do it your own way. When I was writing my personal statement I had looked at some writing samples from online sources and for the most part, I thought they were horrendous. I decided to write my personal statement exactly how I think a personal statement should look and added my own touches. I know many of us think that people in the application process
    1 point
  7. 1. I'm afraid you have to put in the hours on this one. It's not as hard as it looks though, it is pretty easy to eliminate a large number of profs. if you know what you are looking for. Plus going through all their research is often very enlightening. Sometimes the stated research interests do not give a complete or accurate picture or may not have been updated in a while. I found reading the abstracts of the latest few publications of potential POIs to be the most rewarding process for identifying profs. I would like to work with. 2. Yes do send your CV, but also send a much shorter summ
    1 point
  8. I just retook it a couple weeks ago. I had to retake it because my scores expired. I honestly only spent a couple weeks preparing, which broke down to a few long haul sessions reviewing math and cramming vocab for the last week. I used the princeton review's most recent book to study, and it seemed to work well. I don't know math very well at all, so that was my biggest concern, and there were actually some question types in the exam which the book didn't prepare me for so watch out! I also did the free exams on the ETS website, I would definitely recommend doing those because they'll hel
    1 point
  9. Sending you good thoughts! I just bought a house, so I'm in the middle of the packing process. It's not going so well seeing as I spend more time looking at my books than I spend time packing them.
    1 point
  10. The CRMEP is possibly the best 'Continental philosophy' program in the English speaking world. I applied to their MA program a few years ago and got accepted. Living in Canada, I had to try to cough up the international fees. The problem with the UK system is that their higher education fees are staggering, especially for international students. There isn't a lot of financial aid unfortunately. your best bet would be to win a Scholarship from your country and try put it towards studying in the UK. It's competitive but that's how it is. As for the faculty, you have world renowned names: Pet
    1 point
  11. And remember that this time is way different from last time. Essentially you are almost there. The majority of the work is already done. Now you just need to edit your work and research programs more carefully. You also have plenty of time (6-7 months). It sounds like you are doing the right thing: starting now. If you spread it out I bet the stress won't be so bad this time. Also remember to relieve some stress. You have plenty of time. Work slowly and take a few days off from your applications. On this forum you see so many people who struck out the first time, and then got into an excel
    1 point
  12. No. I went to a *very* modestly ranked small liberal arts college. I then did my MA at UChicago. So I would say that that was the major jump, and that going from Chicago to (now) Yale is a much shorter jump. However, I do want to note that such a jump is in the minority. Like you, I've also observed that the students who end up in leading programs tend to come from other leading programs. I'm sure there is an obvious momentum here--clearly, the best programs desire students vetted by other comparable programs. Yet, this is not an absolute. It can be overcome. It's just unusual and, the
    1 point
  13. Datatape

    Placement Rates

    Part of the job of the graduate director is to have that information available. Trust me, you aren't annoying them (and if you are, then that's likely a sign you don't want to go to this particular institution). A good graduate director will be able to rattle off placement rates from the top of her head and know both where her past students went and what kind of position they acquired (Assistant Professor, Instructor, Adjunct, etc.). Now, with that said, if a school provides an up-to-date list on the website, take that as it is and don't bother contacting the grad director. If there is no
    1 point
  14. I experienced the same situation when i was an MA student. I chose a topic that was beyond an MA thesis as described by the others, and i finished my studies after 4 years. I completely know how you feel, and this experience made me be stronger than before. I'm now in my 30s, but i decided to apply for PhD programs in the US with a GPA of 3.5. It made me be more ambitious than before. Don't let that experience depress you in any shape or form. Good Luck!
    1 point
  15. somethinbruin

    Cleveland, OH

    With a good pair of boots (I like Columbia brand) and a winter coat, I think it's totally doable. It might just take a few minutes longer. Cleveland gets a lot of snow, but we also deal with it pretty well, most people have their sidewalks cleared in a pretty timely fashion.
    1 point
  16. Quigley

    BA/MA

    PS - For future reference, I think you will find that you will get more people willing to offer helpful advice here than when you post these types of questions on poliscirumors.com
    1 point
  17. The best advice I got on the GRE Subject Test was take it if (and only if) you will do well on it. Unless, of course, you are applying to a program that requires it -- but none of mine did.
    1 point
  18. for your moving...sell everything big and only take the essential. I was able to move from west coast to east coast with everything in my car. driving took me almost a week. but with the money i got from selling stuff, i cover pretty much my gas and hotel. so that may be an option you can consider...
    1 point
  19. I've plugged this book recently, but it's a good one! The first couple of chapters deal with the application process and the author poses questions to think on thoroughly and deeply before and while pursuing grad school applications. I think that allotting time for such thinking exercises is worth doing, as it helps to develop a self-reflexive awareness/maturity that will come through in your apps: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/93455 Know thyself! (And know what you're getting into...) I found this blog to be helpful: http://science-professor.blogspot.ca/ She has whole sections o
    1 point
  20. This book on graduate admissions essays. I'm an excellent writer, but writing an admissions essay (especially within 500-1000 words) was really difficult for me. This book really helped break down what admissions committees wanted, and gave some pretty good sample essays.
    1 point
  21. Converge them on a single plane! I have structured the answer so that pretty much of your questions are responded to.
    1 point
  22. Your answer leads me to wonder how much lead time you're giving them, and if you're asking for all your schools at once, or going one at a time for each different school as you apply. Ideally, and especially if you're applying to a number of schools, you'd want to go to them 3-4 months before the letters need to be in, and have a list of all the schools you want them to write for, along with when the letters need to be in.
    1 point
  23. I will be moving to a new city and university where I do not know anyone. I have decided to live in a one bedroom apartment in a duplex building (all residents are graduate students) about a block away from campus. There are other apartment complexes in the area and the average resident is a graduate student. While I am worried about the first few weeks being a little lonely, I know it will be because it will be a lot of change at once. While there were many factors as to why I decided to live in an apartment off campus by myself, I know it will be the right decision for me. Your social l
    1 point
  24. My quant score was an abysmal 153 and I still got accepted to programs ranked 20ish and I'm not even a theorist. Just remember that the GRE scores are simply one part of your application and that you should spend time on improving other aspects of your application (like the SOP). There's definitely hope for you!
    1 point
  25. aberrant, I believe the assumption is that you would not be using Priority Mail if shipping USPS. Instead, you'd be shipping Parcel Post or Media Mail. Media Mail works out to under 50 cents a pound generally speaking. And of course all of this depends a great deal on how far you're moving since the prices are based on ZIP codes.
    1 point
  26. I might hang out here a little bit to offer advice since somehow I was successful this year. There are.... a few things I wish I'd known going into things. Maybe I can come back in a few weeks and post them. I look forward to seeing where all of you go!
    1 point
  27. Don't listen to anything in this thread so far. Formal modeling is when you create and analyze a mathematical model of behavior of some kind. It need not be game theoretic or social choice theoretic, though those are both very prominent in the business. It could be something as simple as the Prisoner's Dilemma, which is a 2 by 2 strategic form game that most incoming students have heard of. The Prisoner's Dilemma, despite being really simple, can be used to develop all sorts of insights about public good provision, and more complicated models of public good provision often boil down to
    1 point
  28. Great feedback. Now, another, perhaps equally pressing issue: when to put it on facebook?!
    1 point
  29. Depends on your career goals. If you think you would like an academic position, then it's important to go to a top 10-15 place and the best path into those places might be via an MS. Otherwise a lower-ranked PhD where you could gain direct entry might be sufficient.
    1 point
  30. kalidousow

    Fordham IPED

    Me! Turns out I got the arrupe thing after all
    1 point
  31. I think you are looking for a PhD program like Science, Technology, and Society. Harvard allows their doctoral students to have a secondary field in STS, including science students. Here's a link: http://www.gsas.harvard.edu/programs_of_study/science_technology_and_society.php Penn State offers this as a graduate minor that can be added to any PhD field of study: http://www.sts.psu.edu/graduates/minor MIT has a PhD program in History and Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS). They have applicants from science and engineering backgrounds as well as social scienc
    1 point
  32. my girlfriend of 4 years and I will both be attending doctorate programs this fall...but 700 miles apart. sadly, we decided it would be best to end it since neither of us wants a relationship where we maybe see each other once a year. plus, it gives us a chance to grow individually instead of relying on each other like we did in undergrad. those are the positives, but it still really sucks.
    1 point
  33. Rents in Manhattan are ridiculous. It's probably a bit more practical to live in Jersey and take trips to Manhattan for recreation. The NJTransit trains go from New Brunswick to Penn Station for $13 though.
    1 point
  34. I've known of people who've done it, but not their first year. I'd say live in New Brunswick the first year, and then once you don't need to be on campus so much you could move to Manhattan. And who knows, maybe you'll find New Brunswick not so bad, and it possible to get all the NYC you need by visiting once a week. It' certainly cheaper.
    1 point
  35. These are unofficial scores. I *just* finished the test, so I won't have my AWA for another two - three weeks. With that said, I feel I did the strongest on that, so I'm hoping for a 5 - 5.5. I'm hoping for top-tier MA/PhD history programs for China. I've read lots of threads on this topic already, so I'm familiar with the proverbial "it depends" response. I don't see my Q getting any better. Also, here in China, the GRE is only on Saturdays, which entails me taking a full day off work. Between testing fees, missing a day of work, commute, etc. taking the test costs me about US$400
    -1 points


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