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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/16/2013 in all areas

  1. American students are nice but sometimes they are unapproachable Just like students from *any* country...? Is it American's TRADITION for an american to take a stranger home for the Thanksgiving meal without permission from his parents? Why are you generalizing to other Americans from the experiences you had with ONE American roommate? Some American young women might do things like this...most probably wouldn't. It seems that she was trying to be nice to you by bringing you to Thanksgiving dinner, but she was inconsiderate to her own family by not warning you ahead of time. You had
    2 points
  2. MissMoneyJenny

    One out, one in

    Two weeks ago I was rejected from the University of Toronto. Thankfully their letter was not snarky or mean, but it was short and I feel like I wasted too much of my time impatiently waiting - not to mention the couple hundred dollars I spent to apply and to have a copy of my transcripts sent. I wasn't too discouraged when I first received the rejection, it wasn't my top choice of school and I had a conditional acceptance elsewhere. But, as time passed, I soon became more and more worried about my situation come the fall. The rejection slowly ate away at my self confidence concerning my ac
    1 point
  3. Thanks everyone for your encouragement and support. Sigh, I'm not sure what to think now. Nothing is ever transparent when it comes to project details and potential outside collaborations with my PI, and I feel this will become a bigger problem in the future. I tried to approach my PI with this, but apparently I got the impression that I've overstepped my boundary, and I only need to "just do your experiments". While I do have other projects that I can based my thesis on, I find it difficult to carry on without fully trusting the PI. People always put their own interests first. I just
    1 point
  4. I agree with some of these but I also think it is worthwhile to read them on your own and see what get out of them. Foucault can be difficult, for example, but some of the best analysis I've ever seen is by people otherwise unfamiliar with his work. I also don't think it ever hurts to read these types of books more than once and in different contexts.
    1 point
  5. Hi texasteacher, Regardless of one's "greatness" in terms of academics, which can be measured in different and sometimes conflicting ways, I think anyone who responds to you and says you can attend this university or that university for sure is blowing smoke to say the least. Graduate school admissions vary greatly by university, or even by department or program, so there are no absolutes. It seems like most grad schools use a holistic approach, choosing candidates who have a number of strengths (or perhaps strengths in certain highly regarded areas). That said, you're in control of a
    1 point
  6. You pretty much hit the nail on the head. Ph.D programs are pretty hard to get into, and as it stands, you don't have very much to show that you're qualified for a Ph.D program. You don't have to know exactly what you want to do going into a program, but most programs need to know that you a) understand what linguistics is and have potential in succeeding as a scholar. Although many people come to linguistics from a variety of disciplines (math, computer science, foreign languages), they usually have to have some demonstrated familiarity with the field before getting into the field. What clas
    1 point
  7. OK this is one of those DUH THIS IS SO OBVIOUS WHY HAVEN'T I BEEN DOING THIS ALL ALONG moments, but here is what I just realized: The BEST way to find POIs is to do this very simple thing, go on the department website and look at the past few years of courses, and figure out which courses look the most interesting to you, and see which professors teach those courses. VOILA. I mean, seriously, I'm sure many other applicants already realized this was the thing to do, but I've been parsing through those one paragraph self-descriptions instead of just checking out courses. I was doing it all w
    1 point
  8. We are all impressed
    1 point
  9. Sure thing! Unfortunately, our first offer didn't go through. Fortunately, we had a second house we really liked, so we are waiting to hear back. Turns out, obsessively watching HGTV doth not a real estate expert make. Edit: WE GOT A HOUSE! In Washington DC! Wow. Just, wow.
    1 point
  10. I have an apartment and the kitchen is magnificent. (As is the pizza place around the corner.)
    1 point
  11. Hello, It varies depending on how you'd want to approach Romanticism. Most schools rarely have more than three Romanticist, so it might be difficult to locate a scholar whose work directly aligns with yours. That said, I haven't had too much trouble finding suitable programs that could match my intellectual needs. At any rate, here are some schools to consider: UC has several very prominent Romantic scholars, such as James Chandler and Frances Ferguson, among more. Also, check out UCLA and Berkeley. Kevis Goodman, who teaches at the latter, is amazing. UW-M is pretty good, too. CUNY. Rutg
    1 point
  12. I found a bundle of professors/programs for you: Petra Dierkes-Thrun, Comparative Literature, Stanford (https://www.stanford.edu/dept/DLCL/cgi-bin/web/people/petra-dierkes-thrun) Elsie Michie, English (Women's and Gender Studies specialization), LSU -She doesn't mention New Woman lit as one of her research interests, but she directed a student's dissertation on New Woman lit in 2006. Beth S. Newman, English, Southern Methodist University -Teaches an undergrad course on New Woman lit Talia Schaffer, English, CUNY Graduate Center Elizabeth Carolyn Miller, English, UC Davis
    1 point
  13. gradventurer

    Virginia Tech

    Hi All, I shall be attending VT as a grad student in EE, Fall '13. Could anyone give me any pointers (or any helpful links on the internet) about whether to go for On Campus housing or Off Campus. I am what they would call a mature student (34 y.o.), Male, from India. I would want a room and bathroom to myself, apart from that I'm pretty flexible. I would prefer someone near about my age (25+would be good, but as long as the room mates are quiet and sane, I don't particularly care). How do I go about finding suitable accommodation? I already did extensive Google search on "graduate/housing
    1 point
  14. Simply familiarising myself with the work (past and present) of faculty members who are of interest to me. Also keeping up with general things in my discipline. And working on French. Duolingo is wonderful.
    1 point
  15. Everybody does it. It's like saying 'have a great day!' to service providers or signing your email with '(warm) regards.' It's a polite communications convention. Trust me, you wouldn't like it if everyone signed the email with what they really think about you! Don't you think you're reading too much into this?
    1 point
  16. I fail to see the problem.
    1 point
  17. Thank you guys for your suggestions and contributions. I eventually graduated this Spring semester. But, it took great efforts from the Provost as well as the Provost's Associate to assist me graduate despite all efforts made by my advisor not to let me. As you guys suggested, I already quit the program before getting to know the University's ombudsman. I was able to set up appointment with him and eventually convinced him that my advisor is deliberately making me not to graduate I knew that certainly I had to stop working with my advisor 'cos his support is annually. By last Fall, I had
    1 point
  18. We did the trip (~22 hours, not including stops or getting stuck in traffic) with our small dog last summer. Some thoughts: - Read up on what pet-friendly food can be calming (special treats, parsley, etc) or they especially like and prepare special treats to give at rest stops (if your cats aren't the sort to throw up, I made up peanut butter and dried liver kongs) - Screw on "coop cups" are a great idea for water/ice cubs. This is the one we use http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GDVUE6 - Take a bottle of your home water to slowly introduce pets to new water - I *highly* recommend a s
    1 point
  19. If there's nothing like an essay to re-grade, I don't think you'll have much luck... and I don't think one grade will make much of a difference long-term anyway, especially if you're not going to grad school for German. You could perhaps ask to go over what you were scored down for and then retake the oral, but I don't think you'll get very far. A friend of mine is a TA, and a kid complained that he did better than other people but got a worse grade (he didn't take into account how different portions of the grad were weighted). When the TA said the grade was legit, he went behind her bac
    1 point
  20. Vocabulary is still very important for the GRE. However, compared to the old GRE -- esp. those pesky antonyms! -- the new GRE allows you to rely on context. For those who are avid readers of The Economist and magazines of its ilk, being able to rely on context is a boon. The other piece of good news is that much of the archaic and formal vocabulary that had crept into the old GRE (basically as a result of everyone cramming most of the high-frequency vocabulary) is absent from the new GRE. As long as you can recognize most of the words in a edition of the New York Times you should be fine.
    1 point
  21. I don't recommend this book for those who are comfortable with math, but the Cliff Notes, "Math Review for Standardized Tests," is an excellent place to start if you haven't touched math in years! By the old GRE scale just going through this book alone should get you somewhere in the 600s. Of course, everyone wants to be in the 700s, so you need to do more than just this book.
    1 point
  22. (the following is in no way meant to disparage any previous posters) While I'm sure that on occasion reverse academic snobbery exists, I think more often than not it's a phenomenon much like "reverse racism" - in that the very people who feel they are being wronged are in fact simply worried they will not get the advantage they feel they are owed. I'm not an anti-intellectual, and there is certainly a strange cultural undertow which sometimes makes me feel as if I'm swimming upstream when I strive to be well informed, articulate, and logical. For example, the constant need for politician
    1 point
  23. The general chatter that I have come across over the past couple years of research into Grad programs is that if you received your BA from an ivy or from a top Leiter department, you can most likely get accepted into a PhD. program without the MA. But, I know the MA route is becoming more common. I think admission committees view it more positively than negatively these days. A few factors in this change of perception regarding the MA would be that admission committees feel safer accepting some one with an MA because they can assume that that student got a 'taste' for grad work in the MA and t
    1 point
  24. arsenalmath

    Virginia Tech

    For houses, I would suggest Hethwood or Woodbine, both are nice places. I lived in Hethwood, its about a 5-10 minute drive from campus. For apartments, Foxridge is the nicest place in my opinion (It's right next to Hethwood). In terms of daycare, Rainbow Riders is definitely the best, but I've heard that it is difficult to get into so I would check them out as soon as possible. I wouldn't necessarily live in Christiansburg, but if that is the best pricing, etc, then it is only a 15 minute drive to tech (just get on 460 and go a couple exits down).
    1 point
  25. Hi... I am new here but wanted to give my stats as a sub 3.0 undergrad Undergrad- Chemistry 2.7 overall, 3.0 in sciences Masters GPA =3.6 Biology GRE-V=158 ,Q=155 writing =4.5 Work experience- 3 years as a teaching assistant/tutor both at undergraduate and graduate level, professional work experience in the chemical environment working as a lab manager Research conducted at both undergrad and grad levels- working on a paper for grad level Applied to all Ph.D. UIC-GEMS=Pharmacology, UCincinnati- Pathology, U of Louisville- IGPBM- Pharmacology, Rosalin Franklin- Pharmacology, P
    1 point
  26. I have to say, Gentlelife, I was giving you the benefit of the doubt based on your original post. Given your clarifications, however, I think you're being both a bit judgmental and a bit oversensitive. You went to bed early when someone asked if you were tired based on a fragment of a conversation you heard earlier that you interpreted as them wanting to "send you to bed". You are upset that she didn't tell you that she hadn't told her parents, because you view this as "unacceptable behavior". What she did or didn't tell her parents was between her and her parents, and not really for you
    1 point
  27. I'm not sure if this is due to a language difficulty or not, but this phrasing right here makes it seem like you don't really care to learn about American culture or the ways in which Chinese and American culture differ -- you just want to declare that you are categorically "right," and desire commiseration in that respect. Speaking as someone who has been an international student before (in China, no less), you'll find it is much easier to get by in a foreign country once you stop thinking of their culture as inferior to your own or somehow less-evolved/less-civilized. What you think is "ca
    1 point
  28. I have to say, I really don't see how inviting you to thanksgiving dinner without aking her parents was rude to you... Ive done it lots of times with a variety of International students. As for them canceling games on your account- that could be viewed as either rude or quite accommodating to you, not doing things that you couldnt participate in. As to it not having to do with culture shock- it really does. You see it as a large deviation to have brought you without asking her parents, but it doesn't seem very out of place to me. Just my thoughts. I enjoy it when my Chinese lab ages inv
    1 point
  29. I am an American student doing a double master's in France and Germany, and I have had plenty of culture shock to go around. The French can be especially difficult, even when you speak the language well - to them, you'll never be Français. It's just a fact you have to live with! So I learned to have a sense of humor (albeit a French sense of humor, which involves a bit of bitchiness - not at all my personal style, but I saw it as an investment to get my hands a little dirty). I'm in Germany now and Germans are much closer to Americans in terms of personal style and directness, but they, like t
    1 point
  30. Dinali

    What's your specialization?

    Yeah, distributed morphology is a bear. I spent almost half a quarter studying it in a syntax class though, so that'll tell you where IT lies at least. On another subject, I've had this conversation too many times: "I'm particularly interested in phonology." "Wait, what? You mean . . . analyzing the bumps on people's heads?" At that point I have to just say yes and offer to do a reading.
    1 point
  31. Apparently, there's something I need to clarify here. My original post does not go down into specifics...My bad... I've never denied the fact that my housemate was quite open-minded because I do sense that she endeavored to do all she could to make me feel welcomed, to make me feel at home away from home. Meanwhile, as I mentioned previously, I cheerfully accepted her invitation with pleasure and have always been willing to embrace exotic culture. I was happy to go to dinner with her and I personally believed this could be a golden opportunity to get involved. However, if I knew she hadn't act
    -1 points
  32. Well, it is true that I am the only child of my family, but I am by no means "a spoilt kid". No one has never got hurt since he left his mother's protective shelter but it is human nature to be self-defensive. I never take it for granted that I should be invited, and I do be grateful to those kind offer, but surely I'll not accept any "humiliating" offer. A red carpet welcome? Your buddy or female friend would not make that remark if he or she faces that situation. This has nothing to do with one-child policy. Many Chinese students do compare the bad of America with the good of China, which I
    -1 points
  33. Good for you that you got accepted to that many programs, but to the point that your letters of rejection would be stained with tears is a bit extreme (and it's greedy on your part to want to send clones of yourself...).
    -1 points
  34. Please try not to be biased for this poll...
    -1 points


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