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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/02/2013 in all areas

  1. 2 points
  2. My first week was AWESOME. I haven't really gotten into the nitty gritty of school yet, since classes started on Wednesday, but the last few weeks have been pretty boss. I met the professor that I desperately wanted to work with, and she's amazing and really friendly. I'm still a little awed at how much time everyone spends hanging out together here, but I love it. I'm definitely not missing Pittsburgh right now.
    2 points
  3. It's been a lot of work (a LOT of work), but I'm so jazzed about being here that it doesn't seem like it. I've got one class that's predominantly theory-based, one class that's pedagogy-based, and one class that's professionalization-based, so I feel like I'm getting very well set up for taking the rest of my coursework. There are ups and downs, as with starting any program, but the ups far outweigh the downs.
    2 points
  4. Hey there, It's Labor Day and I'm so grateful for the day off. Last week was the first week of classes at my university. Some thoughts: - I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice everyone has been. - I am walking way more than I have been in the last couple of years... this is a good thing. - I may need to experiment with different bags for schlepping my stuff, because what works for short distances doesn't necessarily cut it for cross-campus treks. (BIG campus!) - The Chromebook is working out beautifully so far. - Suddenly I am interested in everything.
    1 point
  5. It's that time again! Please list where you plan to apply and your subfield.....and later your acceptances, rejections, and waitlists! LET THE FUN BEGIN!!!
    1 point
  6. i'm a 2nd year grad student and heard that a professor at another university is working on a project that highly interests me. not only that, but he is looking for a grad student with my particular expertise. i really want to transfer to this grad program now and i am writing a letter to him right now. but i am at a lost on how i should word the letter. any thoughts? in the end, i want to know if he would be willing to take me on and i don't know how to say that. another complication is that i applied to his department before, but was rejected (he was not on the admissions committe
    1 point
  7. I'm really excited because I am also baking bread! I just got my first bread machine, and made a killer loaf of wheat bread this afternoon. Oh yeah, and classes start for me tomorrow. Stoked! I can't believe it's really happening. But most importantly: I heart bread.
    1 point
  8. Just chilling. Reading some Bakhtin, baking some bread. I'm pretty content.
    1 point
  9. I hate walking on egg shells and while I don't go around annoucning I'm a grad student (I also have a full time job not related to my studies), I don't donwplay it either. I work too hard at work and I too work hard at school to allow anyone to make me feel bad for wanting to pursue an advanced degree....or two. They can think whatever they want, but I don't let it bother me. The saddest part is when said dismissive attitude comes from close family members.
    1 point
  10. First week has been terrific. Very warm welcome extended not just to me but to my spouse by both departments that I'm a member of, facilities/resources almost overwhelming, classes as stimulating and interesting as I imagined, colleagues warm and friendly, etc. But my campus is also surprisingly large and one of my go-to buildings is inconveniently out of the way. May upgrade to a current-gen Air around winter. Other than that I couldn't be happier.
    1 point
  11. I'm glad to hear that others are enjoying their first week of classes as well! I agree that the workload is intense--my one seminar has 600+ pages of reading this week-- but I'm loving every minute of it.
    1 point
  12. look at the faculty at the schools you want to apply to, find out what they do their research in, and if it's something you like, then they can become a potential advisor. You need to do some research before you come on here. Learning about a professor's research interest is actually quite easy (their group website). Make sure you have at least 3 professors at each school who you are willing to work for. Don't get caught up on your GRE scores. Research experience, LOR, and SOP are infinitely more important and if they are stunning, then you'll be surprised where you could end up. I wo
    1 point
  13. That's actually the one thing I think can be improved upon. I was only working with my boss for 6 months when she wrote me my reference and this year she knows me a lot more and I'm sure will write me a better letter. In addition I had another letter from a social worker I am working with but I didn't know her too well either- and now I know her very well. So same thing. My final one was from my thesis prof so I will use him again. I'm sure that one was good. Thank you for all your support and kindness!!!
    1 point
  14. kafralal

    The Luxury of Art School

    It is both a luxury of time and money. Even more so if there is no funding and if your time would be better (for any number of reasons) spent elsewhere. Depending on your long term desires, you have to decide whether it is a good use of your time and money. I don't think this is a discussion particular to art and an MFA; what you have described is common to most dedicated learning situations. I am an older student who home schooled—rather unschooled—four children and so I am a big proponent of both life (autodidactic)-learning and life-long learning, but university has provided me (and my
    1 point
  15. OMG, you have such amazing experience. Now I can see why I didn't get into U of T and you were put on the waitlist. My background seems to pale in comparison. If the journal paper is new since your last application and some of the other things you mentioned, your application should really stand out compared to last year. I agree with MSW13. It comes down to numbers and this program is in high demand. Sometimes when you are so close it may come down to pure and simple luck. Perhaps one or two of the committe members will be different this year and they will appreciate your experience more t
    1 point
  16. That does sound like you did your best. The only other thing you may want to look at is your references. Did you feel that they were strong? Were the people who wrote them knowledgeable? If the answer is 'yes' and 'yes', then I cant imagine what else you could possibly do. You haven't been sitting back this past year so you have some good things to add which will only strengthen your application.
    1 point
  17. lol, yes I totally get the frustration! Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that you haven't done all that already--you sound like you are on the ball and clearly want this very much. When I went over my statement for my second time applying, I did make some changes. I deleted or updated some areas that were less relevant a year later and I changed other areas with better wording. It was a little different for me because nobody read my first submission but I still knew it could be improved. Did you receive constructive feedback from the people who reviewed it? Are they in the field or in a d
    1 point
  18. Thank you so much DreamingMSW, what a kind compliment! **disclaimer** --The following is just my opinion. I have no experience on an admissions committee, nor have I spoken directly with someone who has been on one. I'm just basing this on my own experience and from my own readings on the subject. It sounds like you have a really great list of accomplishments and have a firm handle on what you'd like to do as a Social Worker. I would suggest that you go over your statement and make sure that you've been able to clearly articulate how these experiences have made you realize what you n
    1 point
  19. just as a minor updated, i did end up getting a TA position! thanks for everyone who helped give me the courage to apply!
    1 point
  20. As far as I know, Indiana University's MA is pretty good. (I went there for undergrad) Everyone gets 96.5% tuition remission, free Health insurance and stipends. Of course, it's only MA.... they don't give you 20k/year like in PhD.. After you pay all the service fees and 3.5% of tuition, I think you get just under 9k/year. If you're very savvy, you can probably live off on that. Bloomington is pretty cheap place. If you get a summer job, you'll be just fine. (you CAN work outside of campus if you're international and you've finished one academic year) University of Memphis offers full tuit
    1 point
  21. "Already Attending" !!!
    1 point
  22. I love Fuzzylogician's categorizing. Here's what I do. Local stress: -Put the work down -Exercise -Go for a walk, usually in a public park -Read a non-academic book -Surf the Internet, watch stupid videos on YouTube -Go out with my friends, even if it's just drinks at their place -Watch TV, especially TV where other people have a lot of problems (Grey's Anatomy is really good for this). -Play video games. Smashing things rules. Existential stress: -Talk to my advisor -Talk to a therapist or counselor -Cry and call my mother -Complain to my husband -Talk with my friend
    1 point
  23. Eigen

    Burned out

    Also, don't overstudy. Take a practice test, see where you rank, and study accordingly. The GRE is such a small part of your graduate applications, that you definitely shouldn't spend more time on it than absolutely necessary- put the extra time into writing samples, SoP, research experience, reading papers of faculty you're interested in working with, etc.
    1 point
  24. Okay, here are my thoughts on the rest of your questions! For context, here is some history of when I applied for NSERC awards. In Fall 2009, as an undergrad in my last year at UBC, I applied for a NSERC CGS-M to use at a Canadian school. Then, two years later, in Fall 2011, as a grad student in my last year of my MSc at Queen's, I applied for a NSERC CGS-D. I ended up going to a US school, so, as required, I declined the CGS-D and accepted the PGS-D instead. Also, I guess I misread something in an earlier post. To clarify, since you are current undergrad student, you won't be eligible to
    1 point
  25. One tip I want to add, now that I've completed my first year of PhD work, is that you have to develop a certain level of... I'll call it apathy. This has been a consistent theme when I speak with others in my program as well. What do I mean by apathy? Well, at the start of your first year doing PhD work you'll likely be somewhat frantic. Everything must be perfect! You must study all of the hours! If you don't you will fail! For me, the realization hit right after my first midterms. I was just so tired from the pace I was forcing on myself that I couldn't do it anymore. I starte
    1 point
  26. Visiting is a fraught question indeed - but maybe it does depend on the place. Here are a few more of my thoughts on it. First, I think one reason that the prof I spoke to discouraged it was because of the false hope it gave people. Of course the faculty members you meet are probably going to be nice to you and talk with you, especially if your interests line up. The department might give you a nice tour of the area and have some current students talk with you as well. The issue I see here is that they are going to do the same for the 25 other people who come and visit during the fall, bu
    1 point
  27. A cocky guy I know (with no advanced education) often says: "I have a PhD - a post hole digger."
    1 point
  28. I think you risk more going behind your PIs back and checking around for other positions...there other people you ask might be hesitant to take on a student who is going behind the back of their supervisor...also, if your supervisor gets wind of it, it might be an non-repairable situation in your relationship. I would (a) talk to your department chair about the possibility of switching and working with another advisor, and ( talk to your current supervisor about the issues you're currently struggling with. You should also consider the fact that your PhD work is merely a means...it's no
    1 point
  29. About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a hea
    1 point
  30. I'm going to be attending a program at Depaul University in Chicago. They have funding.
    1 point
  31. Lisa44201

    When to contact POIs?

    Give him a break. Things happen. It could have been something as innocuous as a student talking to him after class that kept him from the phone. Maybe there was a traffic jam. Maybe he had a flat tire. & etc. Life doesn't always go by electronic planners.
    0 points
  32. These walls between disciplines are all quite artificial. Before it became its own field, history was taught through other subjects across the academy. If we must categorize, I'd consider history to be a humanities field, since it is primarily about the interpretation of texts. But historians often weave in quantitative analysis and social science methods, making history (to my mind) the perfect mix of not-flaky but also not-boring.
    -1 points


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