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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/24/2014 in all areas

  1. When shopping, I immediately go to the back of the store and find the sales rack or shelves. For clothing stores, I'm not really aware of anything that's not on sale; also for clothes, I try to buy out of season and anticipate what I need (in moving across the country to an actual seasonal climate, I bought a bunch of sweaters last month in H&M for around $5 each). Watch out for psychological tricks, especially in advertisements. Just because it's on sale doesn't mean it needs to be purchased. I learned this lesson from my dad, who goes crazy with coupons and sales and stockpiles items
    2 points
  2. Vene

    Selecting schools

    I'd say not to be afraid of applying to higher caliber institutions, your degree is just as valid as any from a high ranking university. If they don't want you, fuck them. For lack of a better reference, feel free to apply to programs typically ranked in the top 50. Of course, you shouldn't be looking merely at ranking/prestige, make sure that wherever you apply suits what you want. Think about how much location matters, do you want to live in a city or someplace more rural, how big of a program do you want to enter, and of course what are your research interests. For example, if you want to d
    2 points
  3. I think it's interesting how the public-private thing plays out across social sciences. It really isn't that big of a deal, but it's not-a-big-deal-ness varies a bit across disciplines. Think about a discipline generally more liberal than our own (like sociology) or one more conservative than our own (like economics). I'm painting with really broad brushstrokes here, by the way. Anyway, I took some US News data for the top 50 or so schools in each discipline and made this plot. Note that the divide is stronger in econ than it is in polisci, and that the divide in polisci is stronger th
    2 points
  4. W/r/t "hot topics," for what it's worth, when I visited WashU, some of the professors there said they got really bored/annoyed reading a hundred writing samples all about the same "hot topic." I think this past year metaphysical grounding and evolution and morality were both really big. I think it is more important to say something new and interesting about any topic you want than it is to stick with a topic that is popular in the literature at the moment. I think the best thing a writing sample can be is original. You don't want to rehash old arguments in favor of some position. You don'
    2 points
  5. Are your parents experts in your field of interest? If not, then tell them (nicely, of course!) to back off. It may even be worthwhile to show them the grad school pages where they explicitly state that they prefer applicants 2-3 years out, as you're 100% right that work experience is extremely beneficial to MPP programs. After your campaign experience, I think it could only help you to work for 1-2 years in a field related to your interests to clarify what you'd eventually like to do long term. Good luck, though -- I know what it's like to have pushy parents...
    2 points
  6. Some crappy journal might, but the good review journals don't publish papers that are just lit reviews; they need to make a novel theoretical contribution or synthesis (e.g., Psych Bulletin, Personality and Social Psychology Review). I'm not capable of this level of thought myself, and I already have my PhD Some journals are (mostly) invitation only too (e.g., Psych Inquiry, Current Directions in Psych Science). They're darn hard to get into. I'm speaking for social psychology, anyway, which fits with the topics you mentioned; maybe IO journals are different. So, realistically I think
    2 points
  7. Hi all, I have been working as an RA for a professor at my local university in the I/O department. The experience has been great; however, she is the closest I could find to my research interests but they are still not that close, and no one else at the university or even in the metropolitan area has any closer research interests. Is there any way I can produce something that would be valuable to the admissions committee that doesn't involve funding and studies? I would like to produce some sort of evidence that I really am interested in the topics I am (primarily goal-setting and motivati
    1 point
  8. Thanks Applemiu and ss2player! And no worries, my list is actually currently sitting around 14 schools, but I didn't really want to take the time to write all of them out, I won't make the mistake of only applying to a couple!
    1 point
  9. oh, sorry i wrote "late July" and it should be "late June ".... im wondering when we will get some info
    1 point
  10. Garyon

    FALL 2015 APPLICATONS

    Ok, I guess I'm gonna start. Hi everyone! I'm Italian and I will (obviously, since i'm writing this post ) apply for a Ph.D. in Linguistics next year (wow!). I'm interested in theoretical syntax, formal models of language, (first) language acquisition, and neurobiological foundations of language. Currently, I'm getting ready for my TOEFL and GRE and I've just started working on my SOP. I'm also looking at faculty's research in order to decide which programs would be most interesting for me. So far, also following my Italian advisor suggestion, I think i'll apply to: Yale
    1 point
  11. I am going to go against the grain and recommend that you have a clearer idea of what you want to study in a PhD program before you start selecting schools. It is not clear to me why you would want to study higher ed specifically. Based on your experience so far - it seems like you would be a better fit for an Applied Linguistic/ESL PhD program not a Higher Ed PhD, This assumes that you want to do research - which I am not convinced that you do. Ultimately - you want to select PhD programs that have professors that you want to work with because their research interests overlap with your
    1 point
  12. I have meetings to plan future meetings. I have meetings where everyone gets to have their say and then the PI just decides what they want to do anyway (seriously, why did we just spend an hour talking about ALL the possibilities... just make the darn decision already!). I have long, long email threads about logistics... where, when to meet? Oops, someone can't make it now, let's ALL look at our schedules again. These things drive me crazy!!! BUT, they are a necessary part of working on research projects with large groups of people. Most of the big grants in my field go to PIs wit
    1 point
  13. Congrats to everyone who got in ! I'm currently still on the waitlist for U of T's 2 year MSW and I've kind of given up for this year - but reapplying in the fall. I was just wondering if anyone in here, who didn't make it their first try either, had any advice on reapplying and getting ready for the next set of applications. I've tried to contact York to see what I could have done better/differently to enhance my application - but from what I've read, it might be too early to do that?
    1 point
  14. Pro: Thank you so much for all your support during this whole grueling process!! And thank you for the dancing!Abed!! Side note... I got my paper accepted to that conference at UMD in October! Are you going to be there? (It's the 'Knowing Nature' two day conference at the end of October.)
    1 point
  15. I know how you feel, and a few months ago I was asking myself the same thing. I ended up writing a lit review over winter break of my junior year with no help. I wouldn't necessarily recommend it as far as publishing goes. I had my advisor look it over then I sent it to an undergraduate psych journal. There are a few out there but I only sent it to one (due to copyright stuff). I got rejected. I don't blame them! If anything, I felt as if writing this paper was a great learning experience for me. Then I submitted the abstract to a regional conference for an oral presentation and it was accepte
    1 point
  16. I agree with what Realities has said though I do slightly disagree that journals don't discriminate. It is not so much the title per se (e.g. RA vs post-doc) but if they aren't familiar with your name in terms of the rest of the literature, that can hold you back. For example, I am currently authoring a lit review that would be relevant to a developmental psychology journal (we are writing about neuroimaging in premature babies); though because we are a neuroscience lab that has never published in a psych journal (only neuro), my PI thought it a bad idea to submit to them since it might be tak
    1 point
  17. For what it's worth, I didn't have any hard evidence to prove I was truly interested in the topics that I am passionate about. I will be entering a Clinical Psych PhD program in the fall, but my undergraduate institution does not have a clinical program. Thus, I was an RA in two developmental labs and one human factors lab. I used my personal statement to demonstrate my research interests, and then, at the interview, I was able to talk intelligibly about my interests in depth. This is what I would recommend to you. I also wouldn't necessarily view your research experience negatively -
    1 point
  18. Looks like you got a little bit of Ron Burgundy in you. Edit: Swanson, Ron Swanson. I got my Rons mixed up.
    1 point
  19. Princeton Review has a useful prep book that also includes a practice test. The book lays out the simple but practical concept of evaluating what to read by "points-per-page." E.g. Keats Odes, taken together, are as likely to turn up on the test as is, say, Joyce's Ulysses, which means the points-to-page ratio of the odes is something around 1:10 where Joyce's p-to-p is 1:1000!!! So it makes much more sense to save time you would spend on works like Ulysses for works like the Odes. http://www.amazon.com/Cracking-Literature-English-Graduate-Preparation/dp/0375429719/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&q
    1 point
  20. UBC and Brown have some pretty good basic archaeology books on their PhD reading lists. http://cnrs.ubc.ca/2013/02/08/ph-d-in-classical-archaeology-reading-list/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/graduate/field.html Take an especially close look at Alcock and Osborne's Classical Archaeology. For archaeology in general, I recommend Trigger's A History of Archaeological Thought and Renfrew and Bahn's Archaeology: Theories, Methods, and Practice.
    1 point
  21. queennight

    GRE Cheat Sheet

    I'm not sure whether or not this requires an entirely new thread, but I figured it might help out some people who were in the same boat as me. I apologize for this rant in advance! I only had about 1 and 1/2 months to prepare for the GRE General test, and I wanted to share some tips for anybody who is in a similar boat (strict timeline, not able to rewrite because of finances, etc.) or has simply just slacked away their time (we have all been there!). If you have any other suggestions for General (how you studied, your timeline, etc.), please share!! I'm sure it could help some lonely and
    1 point
  22. CSU East Bay has the same requirement. To meet this the college offers a class in the summer called Human Biology for Social Workers Look at the school you are going to attend to see if they offer something similar. Community Colleges offer human bio, but often it comes with a lab requirement. Really talk to the college and see what they will accept.
    1 point
  23. Don't get me wrong, it's great to share resources, and it's great you're reading so much, but this test is not designed to be a comprehensive exam like you will have after you finish coursework in a Ph.D. program. It is designed to measure breadth of exposure, so if you spend all your prep time reading books rather than becoming familiar with major characters, basic plot, and major quotations from central texts (check out vade mecum and hapax legomenon in addition to the UCSB list) and preparing to handle theory questions or very specifically framed reading comprehension questions, you're not
    1 point
  24. Along with looking into good intro to classical archaeology textbooks, you should also look into regular archaeology textbooks. Those will normally have all of the information associated with archaeological methods and theories. I say this because while classical archaeology texts will have more information pertaining to the classical world, you won't have any actual archaeological foundations. My school uses the Greene & Moore textbook Archaeology: An Introduction. ISBN: 9780415496391 If you have any other questions pertaining to archaeology I might be able to help. I'm actual
    1 point
  25. Postan92

    ...not excited

    You're most certainly not the only one! I'm actually very nervous about starting graduate school in the fall! I heard a lot of stories about busyness and a significant change in life and it unnerved me. But reading through the rest of the posts on other threads here have calmed me a bit. It sounds like even though biology experiments will force wonky hours and a lot of work, that it can still be balanced with time to relax. I try my best to also recall the fact that if you're going to graduate school, then it's a huge accomplishment. In many cases, high grades and successful research exper
    1 point
  26. I agree with albuhhh that it's probably self-selection. When I did my MPA at Syracuse most students were left-leaning politically (including myself), but we had a couple of conservative students who added greatly to classroom discussions. I wish there had been more.
    1 point
  27. I don't at all think that it will hurt you in admissions. Most schools, especially the elite programs, are looking to fill a diverse class where the students can learn from each other, and my guess is having work experience that differs from the rest of the applicants can only help you. I think the main reason it seems that MPP/MPA students are overwhelmingly left leaning is self-selection. I have plenty of right leaning friends who work in politics/government, but for whatever reason, very few of them apply to MPP/MPA programs and instead tend to lean towards law school. Anecdotally small
    1 point
  28. Students, When you are visting programs this semester you will meet a lot of graduate students. Keep in mind that the first and second year graduates students have very little idea of what it takes or means to be successful in a Ph.D. program. None of them have successfuly completed a program and many of them will fall victim to attrition at some point. Keep in mind that the first year graduate students you meet have only completed a single semester of graduate training. These people will want to give you all sorts of advice and try to speak with authority about graduate school. Try not to
    1 point
  29. We came across your conversation about joining a master’s degree and would now like to inform you about NIT, Northern Institute of Technology Management in Hamburg (Germany). NIT offers a double degree program, including a Master of Science in Engineering plus an MBA or Master of Arts in Technology Management. This combination is unique in Europe. Studying at NIT means living and learning in an international, multi-cultural atmosphere. Our students and professors come from all over the world, all of our courses are taught in English, and our curricula address the international issues facing
    -1 points


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