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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/27/2014 in all areas

  1. Never ever ever. Just pretend the exam never happened and move forward with your applications.
    2 points
  2. Hello All, I haven't blogged for bunch here, but I thought I would just make a list of advice I thought of as I've been in graduate school a while and am starting at a new school. This advice isn't necessarily unique, but hopefully it will help people anyway. It doesn't make sense to apply to a few top graduate schools, it makes much more sense to apply to many top graduate schools. This rational should make sense; if your ultimate goal is to go to a top program, apply to all of the top programs for your best chance. Too many times I see people who target midteir schools and throw in t
    1 point
  3. Yep! I did the same thing while waiting in the car this morning. Cracked open the Cracking the GRE book and re-read the A- and B-list materials...and a couple of things helped me get what I'm assuming were correct answers. It just goes to show that all the studying in the world can help you a bit, but usually it's just lucking out by having certain things fresh in your mind that happen to be pertinent for the exam. It really seems like cramming is a reasonable strategy for the GRE subject test in literature...which sounds crazy, but there it is.
    1 point
  4. Well, that's over with! How's everyone feeling about it?
    1 point
  5. Well, first off, I don't think your problem will be so much how to deal with bombing your first paper as much as it is how to deal with your professor. You seem to have some pretty basic disagreements. I've received plenty of negative feedback on my writing and speaking - how can you improve if you don't know what's wrong - and public embarrassment is, if used correctly, an effective teaching technique, but I don't know anyone who would use it as their first teaching technique. I would certainly go talk to him and see what's up. The worst that can happen is that he tells you all the things you
    1 point
  6. This is phrased somewhat negatively and the author isn't my favorite person, but it's sound advice: Grad school is one of the last opportunities you will have to freely admit ignorance, make mistakes, or explore new intellectual ground and get feedback on it not only from your peers, but also from your supervisors without repercussion. Failing to take advantage of this only hurts you. You should also remember that 'talent' is, more or less not a real thing. When I first started, the distance I perceived between myself and other graduate students was immense. They were so good at t
    1 point
  7. Yeah, this happens. You want to be fair and are afraid you might screw it up. It'll get better as you become more experienced and confident in what you're doing. If you're unsure, start out slower and give yourself more time. Do one round with just reading and comments, without taking off points for anything. Do one question at a time and go through your whole pile. When you're done, you'll have a good idea of how people did in general, what kind of mistakes you see, and therefore how you might want the grades to come out. As you go, keep a list of the kinds of errors you see and how many poin
    1 point
  8. Are you very unsure of your research interests or something? I understand applying to 2 different departments at the same school if the faculty overlap alot but there is certainly no reason so apply to 5 programs at the same school unless you have absolutely no idea what you want to study (and in that case, get more research experience first!). This list also seems way to top heavy. Honestly, looking at this gives the impression that your goal is to go to a fancy school, not pursue research. I would choose one program at each school that best fits your research interst and apply only to t
    1 point
  9. ProfLorax

    Department Activities

    I think this question is dependent on your department culture and whether or not you are funded. As a funded PhD student, I figure that the departmental events (not all, but some) are part of my job. As a first year, I went to as many as I could and was interested in. In terms of culture, last year, our grad student org president emailed a scathing email to all first-years claiming that faculty and staff pay attention who show up and who don't. It was pretty apparent that we are expected to participate in departmental culture, and that first and second years (pre-ABD status) are doubly expecte
    1 point
  10. I think you have reasonable chance at some of those schools but a word of caution. I know from experience that Hopkins will allow you to apply to multiple programs but the programs have little to no communication between them. I ended up with 3 interviews there and quite a cluster during interview weekend...
    1 point
  11. Just as a word of caution, check the results page to make sure you are in line with who has gotten admitted into these programs in the past. At least in my area (BME), these schools pretty much require 95% plus quant and 3.9 + GPA. I would recommend considering applications to some schools who have a lower threshold for GREs and GPA.
    1 point
  12. 1. That is an excessive number of applications. 2. You should check if you're even allowed to apply to so many departments within a single university. 3. You probably want to fine tune your research interests if you can't your list smaller than that.
    1 point
  13. Also, it might help to think into the future for low-functioning individuals. They may seem nonverbal, but maybe they can sign. Perhaps they understand much more than it seems. As you continue to study, you start to learn about how the brain is impacted with different disorders and how you can best reach these individuals. They might be frustrated because they're not being understood and this manifests itself in those bad behaviors. When you can find them a functional mode of communication, they will gain confidence and communicate in their way and their time
    1 point
  14. I've never read any of my letters but here are three important characteristics. 1. Positive. Especially for American programs, it should use lots of standout words like superb, unique, exceptional (source). It should emphasize your research ability because perceived competence drives hireability (source). 2. Detailed and concrete. It should have specific examples, e.g., ran studies, analyzed data, wrote results. As Izs said, more than just what's on the rest of your application or in your transcript. [i get reference letter requests from people in my large lectures and I tell them, "I'
    1 point
  15. A good letter says a lot more than "got an A in my class." A good letter shows that the writer actually knows you and your work and your capacity for graduate study, which in many ways is very different from undergraduate study. Preferably, the letter is written by someone who has worked with you outside of class and/or has supervised your research. The letter should say things that the admissions committee would not already know just from reading the rest of your application. It should attest not only to your intelligence but, importantly, to your maturity, responsibility, work ethic, and str
    1 point
  16. Speaking from a Canadian perspective....You can apply to a Clinical Psych PhD program with an MA in another area of psychology (such as an experimental program), but you will need to take clinical master's courses as part of your program to catch up on the missing coursework and your schedule will be very different from most people in your cohort. So yes, it is possible. However, this path is typically more difficult to embark on. If you apply to MA Clinical programs, many schools will take somewhere between 5-10 students (most closer to the lower end of this range). Nearly all MA students wil
    1 point
  17. So, I'm a little nervous because this will be my third round of PhD apps (first time was to just 4 socioling programs straight out of undergrad, second was last year to 7 socioling after finishing my MA). I feel like I'm a much stronger candidate since last time because not only do I have my master's (from NYU in Spanish linguistics), but I just completed a research fellowship in Greece and Turkey and have a bit more experience under my belt. Somebody recommended branching out to ling anthro since they tend to have more funding, so I'm going to give that a shot. My undergrad GPA was a 3.65 gra
    1 point
  18. I find it VERY easy to believe that people would have no idea Columbia is an Ivy in large swaths of the West Coast. My High school counselor in charge of arranging college admissions information sessions, and inviting recruiters didn't know (and couldn't name) the Ivy leagues but did know the Big Ten (and then, the Pac-10) schools. I found this out because I went to a University of Penn session, which the counselor thought was actually for Penn State, and introduced it as one of the Big Ten (sports) schools. Both I, and the UPenn rep had to correct her that it was actually not part o
    1 point
  19. Why not do a limited application cycle this year and see what happens? Apply to your top, top choice programs and also look for jobs. For what it's worth, I went straight into a PhD program in public health from undergrad. My undergrad GPA was much lower than yours (a 3.42); I did not do an MPH and in fact did not have a master's; and I didn't have any practical public health experience. I did have 2.5 years of research experience in undergrad, though. Your GRE scores are low-ish but still acceptable, I would say. You may want to retake them if you have the time and money. I would
    1 point
  20. My program is not History but I've been saying do not contact professors, especially do not contact professors via email, unless you really have a purpose. Most posters incorrectly infer I am saying do not email or contact professors, which I am not. But I feel really good that half the posts on this thread including the dean mentioned in the first post, are against it. The more people you network with the better, but spamming people in positions of authority is a bad idea. I just checked my pending applications and only one asked about POIs - the question was not who I have talked with but wh
    1 point
  21. I don't think you know my background so I won't be offended by your ignorance, but I did post a disclaimer, did you notice that? At least I identified my program, unlike your anonymity. And most programs have much in common, so, yes, I think it was a helpful post. Now, can we help the OP rather than needlessly attacking others?
    1 point
  22. xolo

    Standing out in a crowd

    I said my view does not represent the common wisdom, but looking at the replies makes me wonder how carefully my post was read. There was a much broader question posed by the OP.
    1 point
  23. Hey everyone-- I had already made my graduate school decision when my husband and I received notice that his job might be changing locations permanently. The graduate school that I had previously accepted, (which I very much want to attend) was very sympathetic to my situation and let me know that they would support me regardless of my decision to remain in that area. They even offered to write me letters of introduction to other graduate programs for a late admission or a Spring start-- of which I have been so appreciative. My issue is this: I applied late admission to a school in the
    1 point
  24. Oh wow! I was a topic of conversation. (I was having a blissful summer free grad student hand-holding.) Yes, that comment was a bit rude. I probably should have left off the last two sentences. However, that doesn't change the meaning of my post. If my grad chair believes someone is not qualified they won't always respond.
    1 point
  25. ghanada

    Los Angeles, CA

    Just wanted to throw in my opinion, as I used to live in Redondo Beach and commuted to UCLA everyday on a motorcycle. Probably about the same distance of commute as what you are proposing. So the motorcycle life is awesome in terms of getting through traffic and being able to park for free. I also love riding so it was a fun way to start and end my day. I think it is doable for sure, but I also want to give you some things to consider. Just keep in mind that riding in LA, especially on the freeways, is no joke. The average speed for cars on the 405 is like 20-30 mph for most busy sections,
    1 point
  26. Let me get this straight: You are upset because someone told you that you're not qualified for admission? He did you a favor by taking time out to respond to you. I tell people all of the time that they're not qualified for admission. What makes you a special snowflake? You'll need to grow some thicker skin if you want a PhD.
    -1 points


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