Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/09/2014 in all areas

  1. 3rd-year PhD here! There's LOTS of great advice on the forum, but here are some quick points that I wish someone had told me in my first year: (1.) Lots of good advice on this list, pick a couple items out (especially the ones about forming good habits) and commit to trying them: http://scholarshape.com/blog/2014/3/18/101-tips-for-finishing-your-phd-quickly (2.) Try to get social like, once a week. While out, especially with other grad students, talk out your projects a bit (but talk about other stuff too!). You'll be amazed at how often things "click" while you're talking them out. Th
    3 points
  2. Two things. First, it's not clear from what you describe as your interests why you want to do a PhD in a linguistics program, as opposed to Computer Science or even Cognitive Science. Some of the options you are considering are strong theoretical departments, and the adcom will certainly wonder about this question. If in fact linguistic theory is not so important to you, I'd expand my search to other fields. MIT Brain and Cognitive Sciences, for instance, does a lot of modeling of language (even some "non-traditional models", as you put it). But this work, as far as I know, is not strongly gro
    3 points
  3. I lied! I got in too! YAY!
    2 points
  4. I was curious about some tips for what to do the day before my test. I thought this list had it all -- check it out if you're unsure of what to do! http://grockit.com/blog/gre/2013/09/25/study-week-gre/
    1 point
  5. Scores are displayed for the timed tests only.
    1 point
  6. Whoa, that's weird. Maybe something to do with the fact that it was untimed?
    1 point
  7. Hola! I'm applying to MA programs in teaching and I'm curious as to the importance of GRE scores. I'm applying to Stanford STEP, UCLA TEP, maybe Columbia, and some other fairly competitive programs. I have a Q157, V168, and 5.5 in W. Obviously, the verbal and writing scores are good, but I'm a little concerned about that 157 quant score after talking to some friends and browsing the GRE forum here. I'm wondering if I need to at least bump that score to 160+. Any input on to how important GRE scores are to these types of programs? Worth retaking the test? Or do teacher preparation a
    1 point
  8. A few things to consider: given that most applicants will also have stellar grades, one semester of good grades won't get you into a program. That being said, if you feel like the work you are doing this semester is truly phenomenal, maybe have one of your letter writers touch upon what you're working on this semester. Or heck, you can bring it up yourself in your SoP: "This semester, I working on a paper on blah blah blah, which I hope to expand into a larger project on blah blah blah."
    1 point
  9. This is something I wonder about a bit too. It might be dependent on field or even specific research project. For my current project, I have a library of about 200 papers but I probably have only thoroughly read about 20 or so. In the paper that I am finishing up, I think I cite about 50-60 of these papers. For the ones I didn't thoroughly read, I just know what GeoDUDE! wrote above--i.e. their main result and how they got there. I find that when I start a new project I might read a bunch of key papers in the field. For example, several papers that set up the problem, then several that de
    1 point
  10. I agree with others that with your current profile you should maybe focus on neuro work that is going on within psych departments. I think that you would be a strong candidate for programs like this. If you are interested in more of the hard science aspects or want to apply to programs in biology departments then holding off a year and taking some basic science classes like ogranic chem and physics could go a long way in proving that you can handle the course work. Also, many people applying to top phd programs in the sciences probably have GRE Q scores around 165 so increasing that score
    1 point
  11. I'm not in a neuroscience program, but I'm currently working in a neuroscience lab and although we very much are focused on the molecular biology aspects we are collaborating with a psychology lab as well for the behavioral aspects. So, I don't think you're completely out of luck, if you apply to neuro programs where they expect significant behavioral work. If you can find some way to get some biology knowledge it may help strengthen your application a lot.
    1 point
  12. I haven't been admitted to any neuroscience programs, but based on my own personal research and people I know, it really depends on the kind of neuro program you want to attend. If you're aiming for molecular neuroscience and you have no background in bio/physics, that might be a problem. Though most of the time, the program will state on its application page what classes are required, if any. On the other hand, if you're interested in neuroimaging, most labs that involve this kind of work are housed within psych departments (e.g. UCLA's PhD in Psychology has a behavioral neuroscience tract)
    1 point
  13. Do you want to be a math teacher? If not, I wouldn't worry about it. Check out Magoosh's GRE averages link by major and tier. It looks like you are in a more than fine range.
    1 point
  14. Thanks proflorax and Wyatt's for your replies! You're right, I should just do both. I'm not worried, but I am international, so it's expensive to send (though not prohibitively so).
    1 point
  15. For almost all of my applications, they send the email either: 1. When you enter the contact information for each recommender (you can usually skip right to this page and not fill in the rest of the application yet) or 2. When you enter the contact information for all of your recommenders and then hit "send" on the LOR page. (again, you can skip right to this page if you want the requests to go out now but not fill in your application info until later). In only one case did a school require me to actually submit the application before they would send the LOR request.
    1 point
  16. Not true at all! It's a good example of what a first draft of sorts looks like. Fuzzy made a lot of great points to help you improve and I really don't have much more to add unfortunately. When you write your next draft, try talking about what your research focus will be, how you fit with that school's particular program, and lastly what you plan to do with the degree and how it would benefit your department. Good luck!
    1 point
  17. Old Bill

    Fall 2015 Applicants

    For what it's worth, I did send Harvard hard copies.
    1 point
  18. omensetter: I didn't apply to Harvard, but I don't see the harm in just following both sets of instructions. Many programs will have different needs than the grad school themselves. Are you concerned about needing to send a hardcopy of your transcript to the department?
    1 point
  19. I just joined grad cafe and have been checking it out nervously while comparing my states to everyone else's. I'm happy to say I just got my acceptance to Fresno State Spring 2015! Can't wait to meet my new cohort! I hope there's a Facebook page or something!
    1 point
  20. I'm not one to tell someone they don't have a chance at anything but I like to be honest. Most MSW programs really do value experience in the field of social work. I don't think you have enough, I think at least a couple years under your belt would be better. Your GPA is pretty good though. They also require some classes, and I know Biology & Stats are some of them; you have stats, but make sure you meet those requirements. I think if you do decide to apply, definitely include in your statement of purpose the reasoning behind switching and what influenced your decision.
    1 point
  21. If you just listed that you have 9 patents, I really wouldn' worry about it. Im mean seriously, look at everything you just listed. Are you really worried about a mediocre verbal score? How does one get 9 patents in undergad anyway?
    1 point
  22. I think the Signo 207 is the best "cheap" pen on the market. Outside of that I prefer Staedtler drafting pencils.
    1 point
  23. @GeoDude, My top program of choice only offers a Master's degree. This was the program that wait listed me last year and ultimately denied me because my GRE quant score was too low. I am from Sacto and go back home a few times a year. I have visited UC Davis on more than one occasion and know for a fact they will not admit me into a Ph.D. program. So, I will be applying to UCD for a Master's w/thesis. I was not aware UCD requires Ph.D. students to complete the entire program, that is good to know. I was also not aware that Brown and URI require the same. I did know that MIT/WHO
    1 point
  24. Not at all! No offense taken. I guess this would depend on what we mean when we say 'believe.' For example, I work also in classical studies, and while I 'believe' that a lot of what, say, Pliny the Elder or Plutarch write, is wonderful (or I believe in its usefulness, it resonance deeply with my own experiences), it's different as I am not using such texts as part of a 'religious' canon (though a different kind of canon). We could extend this to any number of students/scholars who study philosophy, art, and so on. To be more direct, I meant that I think it's a bit sad and misguided to imag
    1 point
  25. So happy that my daughter got into CSU Fresno for spring'15. What a relief!
    1 point
  26. Though anecdotal, my scores weren't exactly glorious in either the General or Subject exam. 156, 142, 4.0 (though having taught comp, I get what they're looking for now). I took the exam for MA program applications and just didn't have time to retake it for PhD apps. I won't even mention the Subject score. Moral of the story: they aren't the end of the world. Did they keep me out of Harvard? Likely. But I got into a handful of programs and am quite content with where I am.
    1 point
  27. All fair points - and you definitely shouldn't apply to a school you wouldn't ultimately want to attend! However, I'd just like to clarify something in case anyone else might be thinking about UC Merced: they are indeed a new school and might not be prestigious in the eyes of many, but their Cog Sci department is absolutely fantastic and their professors have a LOT of "street cred" on the field, which is what ultimately matters in terms of research. So for others that have other requirements and might be interested in Merced, do not feel discouraged.
    1 point
  28. It is a common question here, but I don't really blame you for asking. Even though I took the GRE general back in May, just yesterday I had a mini fret session over whether or not my scores were good enough, and searched old threads on the topic for the umpteenth time. A verbal north of 160 / 85% seems to be a pretty good benchmark for most programs. Better is better, of course, but these things are relative.
    1 point
  29. I am only skimming right now. Forgive the frankness, but: 1. It reads very conversational, like you're telling me your life story over drinks at the bar. 2. It's longer than it needs to be. 3. Despite being long, the important pieces are either short or missing: the emphasis is almost exclusively on the past (~800 words); you only briefly mention your current interests and your future plans (~350 words). 4. It's very self congratulatory. You want it to be inferred that you're great, but it really doesn't sound good when you just come out and say it yourself. 5. There are typos and mis
    1 point
  30. I just want to throw in my thanks to those who are sharing their experiences and general tips. I'm an Oct test taker and really appreciate everyone's kindness and generosity
    1 point
  31. Does anyone have anything to add to what omensetter said about time? For my part, when I took the practice tests, I typically finished about 35 minutes before time; during the actual test, I finished maybe closer to thirty, so not a large difference at all. There was nothing surprising about the formatting for me, and the reading was actually a little easier for me than taking the practice tests (probably because I practiced on the computer--on paper, it's a lot easier to stay focused and to viciously cross out wrong answers). For anyone taking the October date, I recommend taking at least
    1 point
  32. I tried chatting with the two other lit test takers, but they didn't seem to want to engage much. I decompressed by...spending six hours at a wedding. It was enjoyable, but boy am I ever beat...
    1 point
  33. I was pointing out that you can easily be sexist, paternalistic, and condescending while making factually true statements, things your previous post implied were mutually exclusive. In fact, it's precisely what happened. What you originally said was this: If being sexist, paternalistic, and condescending is not your intent, next time I would say something along these lines: "Hey, I know you've been taught that women are supposed to play hard to get and wait for men to ask them out or show interest in them, but this is a terrible way to go about doing things. You'll find life is s
    1 point
  34. It might surprise you to know that what you have posited here as a binary is, in point of fact, not.
    1 point
  35. I don't think that's common at all. What you sometimes see is people with a linguistics PhD whose research concentrates mostly on a particular language or language family get a job in a language/lit department that specializes in that language, and offer a few linguistics courses there. Off the top of my head I can think of people who have done that with Japanese, Russian, German, and English. I'm sure there are others. It's not always something people want to do because it means that you may get isolated as a scholar. You won't have (m)any other colleagues who work within the same theoretical
    1 point
  36. Here are some Sunday-afternoon ramblings in response to your question... Def a third author on a better journal. It's much better for you to be an author on a well-cited article and know the hoops one must jump to prepare an article for a good publication. However, if you want to head to an R1, you should try to get your name on as much of anything as you can. I recently had a paper accepted to a good journal and the anticipated publication date is 18 months out. It took 6 months to work through revisions with reviewers. Given these kind of timelines, you should be working on 2-3 art
    1 point
  37. just to show how bad my slump is, i went through my entire closet and threw out everything with holes or stains in it. five garbage bags worth of clothing that have been waiting to be purged since my first year of college. and i did laundry and cleaned the bathroom and exercised this morning (which i usually do at night, if at all). i must really not want to get to work...
    1 point
  38. So many of these posts describe my context exactly. Done courses, done comp exams, done ethics clearance, doing most of my data collection this spring... hoping for Dr. Andsowego to be born in spring, 2013. I have found it sooooo hard to stay motivated at times! However, I've had some great advice: We're not meant to work 24/7 on academics. Life isn't like that, and even though it's hard to feel "good" about doing dishes, or reading for pleasure, or surfing the 'net, it's okay. Sometimes I think that as grad students (especially PhD-ers) we are programmed to feel guilty if we're not workin
    1 point
  39. I just had a professor who sits on admissions committees look over my SOP. My introduction was talking about how I liked to go to museums as a child and was fascinated by the ancient world. He said that starting out like this is a huge mistake. Obviously if you are applying to study archaeology at the graduate level, it's pretty much assumed that you're fascinated by the ancient world and probably enjoy museums. But so do lots of people. What makes you unique. Attempt to illustrate your passion for the field without really telling some kind of silly story about your childhood. This is also
    1 point


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.