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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/18/2015 in all areas

  1. I thought I would do American history for a quite some time because I basically sucked at foreign languages. I could never make As, let alone any grade above a B-. Confidence had a lot to do with my desire to avoid foreign languages even though I really did like learning about other cultures. Then I had a supervisor who told me flat out that I would not get a job in my dream field of work without German. Having already struggled through three languages by that point, I had to think pretty hard about how badly I wanted to do that kind of work. Eventually, I buckled down and learned German (
    2 points
  2. Just awarded a scholarship for "academic excellence" after completing my first year of graduate studies. I don't care what anyone says - grades DO matter, even if it's only for scholarships.
    2 points
  3. ^^ re: the last two posts especially, I love an excuse to talk about the importance of languages, but the OP's made it clear they're not interested in pursuing a Ph.D (which leads me to believe academia is a firm "no") so I don't really think it's a "requirement" per se. That being said, OP languages are exceptionally difficult and while they may not be required for your line of work, any work or comfort you can show in them will do miles for your career. Especially in the digital age; while people are converging on the use of English, there are rich conversations that are being held in all s
    1 point
  4. I honestly believe that people who are reluctant to take language classes should re-evaluate why they want to get into academia. If you are in the humanities you really should know French and German. Not for your day-to-day research necessarily, but you'll need these languages for historiography, attending conferences, and collaborating with other scholars. You (universal *you*) are pigeon-holing yourself by not wanting to take language classes.
    1 point
  5. In a previous life, I was working full time, and taking 3 graduate classes per quarter (although the average full-time student there took 4). I was single at the time, and had no pets, and no friends outside of work (which was OK for me then). At it's hardest, I would get to work around 7 or 8, go to class on any given day for three hours at some point (which my bosses OK'd), and stay at work until about 6 or 7pm. I ate breakfast and lunch at work, usually while working, and occasionally dinner, too. Then I'd go home and read and write for anywhere between 1 and 4 hours. Sometimes I'd pull ove
    1 point
  6. gellart has it nailed. Do you want to just graduate? Then those expectations sound fine. But if you want to land somewhere at the top of your field then more is required... It's the same in any professional field--just ask an associate who's trying to make partner at a top firm, or a med student who wants a residency at Harvard Medical School.
    1 point
  7. Spring admits for most programs are almost non-existent. There are usually course sequences you need to complete (especially in 2 year Masters) that make spring admits difficult for full time students. If you live close enough, there is nothing wrong with reaching out to the department about setting up a visit. I would suggest contacting the department admin, let them know you are a prospective student looking to visit, and that you would like to set up meetings with the DGS or professors. My department doesn't fly in MAs, but will usually let them come to a class/meet profs on request. One su
    1 point
  8. I agree with Gellert. But I would also recommend that you try talking to your adviser and letting him know that the project you are working on isn't really appealing to you. He may be able to have you work on something that appeals to you more. Since he is funding you, it's better that you work for him for a semester or a year before you try leaving him. As someone above mentioned, it won't be a complete waste of resources for him since you would hopefully get some work done for his group. If, after a considerable time (like a year), you still feel disinterested, you should try to change advis
    1 point
  9. It does sound like an amazing opportunity. You could always check with your school and see if they'd accept the credits as transfer. Sometimes they can find equivalent courses, my school did that for me when I transferred in. But you don't need to do that because it sounds like your GPA is pretty good. Most schools look at the last 2 years (Sophomore and Junior) when you apply from what I've heard. Plus your major GPA is perfect. So I don't see why you'd have a problem. Maybe try taking the GRE first and see where you'd land. What kind of graduate degree are you looking at getting? One
    1 point
  10. Hi there, from my experience with applying schools will have a form to be completed. Some schools do allow optional, but not in lieu of, letters. You should definitely narrow down your school choices as soon as possible then go to each school's website to locate, if available, the LOR forms.
    1 point
  11. Doing a master's was a good play in your situation as that GPA and lack of research experience would have disqualified you from the majority of PhD programs. You are basically doing right now all you can do to make you a good candidate for those schools you listed though I wouldn't apply to quite so many. Refine that list based on your interests in geophysics over the next two years as you learn what you like and don't like in research. Get at least one good quality publication, present at conferences where you can network with potential PIs at the institutions you are interested in, and get a
    1 point
  12. auygur

    Gre for application

    Hi Elif, Low score in XX, is always a relative term. What are your scores and are you applying to masters or phd? I didnt go to MIT info sessions yet but I just went to Harvard's phd info session. They (of course) said they dont have a strict cut off for GRE but people they have been accepting were in 85th percentile in BOTH verbal and quant sections. Well, that was certainly a bad news for me since my verbal score in only 58th percentile (quant is 97th). I think if you want to be competitive - I would suggest you to be min 75-80th percentile for MIT. I am retaking GRE as a matter of fact. (Pl
    1 point
  13. Oh, wow, yeah why did they do that? The signatures were a really helpful way of getting a snapshot of peoples' information and interests, and of keeping track of their outcomes. Now that they no longer exist, my statement about my signature is entirely unhelpful. So here goes: I received my BA from a SLAC back in 2010, double majoring in philosophy and music. I applied to a small handful of programs in the fall of 2009, but my applications were hashed together quickly and I didn't take the time to thoughtfully consider which departments would be a good fit for me. Consequently I was shut out.
    1 point
  14. In my opinion, you aren't going to be able to hide your GRE scores. They are either going to be too low or they won't matter enough to sink your application if its strong enough. You should be writing about the research you want to do in your statement of purpose, and not about the past. Listing tutoring, qualifications ect will be on your CV. Why waste space? You need to show why what you want to do in the future fits well with what the department wants to do in the future: there are very few applicants (in general) who can eloquently describe that. It is much harder to do that than get a
    1 point
  15. My experience in graduate seminars has really been as wide ranging as Wonton Soup describes. I've had a feminist theory class where nothing the professor could do managed to keep the atmosphere from becoming progressively hostile through the semester. I've had classes where the professor is so dynamic that everyone's performance is made better. I've had classes with a professor who is amazing and helpful one-on-one, but will bore you to tears in a group discussion. If I had advice, I'd say expect the same variety of human error as anywhere else. I'd say the biggest difference from undergrad i
    1 point
  16. It depends a lot on the students, the size of the course, and the professor teaching the course. Sometimes students will be asked ahead of time to lead a week's discussion; sometimes the prof will do a little kickoff; sometimes it will be all about small group activities; sometimes the prof will guide discussion using questions/comments from a message board everyone writes to before the class; and sometimes it's just open, blank discussion. The number of students in a class will influence what a day looks like, as open, unstructured discussions are generally bad for larger classes (where the l
    1 point
  17. Also, why did they get rid of signatures? That's kind of annoying.
    1 point
  18. I'm starting a one-year MA in the Classics department at the University of Toronto in September, with a focus on ancient philosophy (the department's willing to let me do nearly all of my coursework through the philosophy department as long as I also stay on top of the... intimidating Latin and Greek reading list, which is pretty exciting). This year will be my second round of applications: last year, I was accepted to a couple Ph.D. and Masters programs, but wanted to take the year to consolidate my abilities in Latin and Greek before starting my Ph.D.. As you can guess, my principal areas
    1 point
  19. Okay, so first off, this is normal, and revisions suck. That said, if this is your first major piece of academic writing, there is a lot for you to learn both in terms of how to write for your particular scientific community, and in terms of how to clearly and concisely communicate your ideas. This is not something obvious or necessarily natural; there are (sometimes unwritten) rules and conventions that you have to learn. Some of that you may get through reading articles in your field, but it's not always going to be clear what is important and what isn't, so you may get a lot of comments al
    1 point
  20. In experimental psychology PhD, my schedule looks like this: Go in at 8 am on days I have class, 9 am when I don't. Work work work Meetings meetings meetings Go home at 6 pm Keep working Stop working at 10 pm Bed 8 am - 10 pm day On weekends I work from maybe 9 am to 6 pm. I work the LEAST out of everyone in my program. (Or, idk, do I? I don't have to TA or RA, so I spend most of my time doing my own research. The people who work longer than I do are usually juggling TAships as well, so that eats up a lot of their time.) Basically, ymmv. In grad school, you
    1 point
  21. TakeruK

    Backpacks/Bags

    I have something like this and it has lasted me many years now: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/targus-tanc-laptop-backpack-black/8848527.p?id=1219371611317&skuId=8848527 The exact model I have is no longer available though. The factors that I care about for these bags are: 1. Padded laptop compartment 2. Padded shoulder straps 3. Extra clasp that goes around your waist (like a hiking backpack) that you can use when it's really heavy 4. Side pockets for water bottles that are zippered (ideally, like my current bag, you can use them both as a zippered pocket or not Extra bonus
    1 point


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