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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/26/2016 in all areas

  1. Evening! I'm currently revisiting my undergraduate papers for submission for Ph.D programs in rhetoric and composition. The trouble is, I have never taken a class in Rhetoric and Composition. I didn't know that Rhetoric and Composition was even a field until six months ago. As such, I'm moderately wigged out about having no writing samples in the subfield. I have plenty of English papers (some of them are even good!), but they all take a lit-crit approach. My question is whether any of y'all know if it's a cardinal sin to not have any written material in Rhet/Comp when applying for Rhet/C
    2 points
  2. I get questions like the third one all the time! I get questions about the War of 1812, various other wars, ancient history.. And when I can't answer it I get "but I thought you knew history." I do! Just a very, very minuscule portion of it on a topic you probably don't care about. Oh and then I get this one from my boyfriend: "Why would you choose to go to school for even more years? you nerd."
    2 points
  3. I'm starting my MA in rhetoric and composition and am technically taking 14 credits in the fall (it's because we have a teaching practicum that starts before the regular semester yet is still billed/counted for the fall semester. So, I don't think it'll be too awful!!). In addition to the teaching practicum, I'll be taking the next part of the teaching practicum (basically a weekly class period to check in/troubleshoot anything), a rhetorical history class, and a public rhetorics class. I love classical/historical rhetoric and am excited to learn more about it, but I haven't done anything
    1 point
  4. Well why do you have to move to study that? There are plenty of Universities right here where you already are, why can't you just go to one of them? I get this question most often from people who didn't go to college or maybe just took a few classes. It's like they just can't fathom how every single school doesn't have a program for every field of study.
    1 point
  5. I'm taking 11 credits my first quarter. My first is a Scandinavian Studies Method course with my DGS and is a required course. I think it should be good, it's a lot of literary theory I've encountered before, but being discussed in a new context. The second, a Textual Theory and Practice course, is through another department. I was very excited to get in as it's the intro course to a grad certificate I'm hoping to incorporate into my masters. I'm interested in print culture and the theory & practice course, in addition to challenging the very definition of "text," covers the production, ci
    1 point
  6. Depends on the program. None will, of course, claim to look at your application any differently, but many will prioritize students who are of an age where they can begin a career, since that's the purpose of doctoral training. But the three questions you should answer are: why, why now, and what do you want to do with it.
    1 point
  7. You don't actually have to go home to do the inspection, just to the state of Texas. El Paso, Amarillo, etc., are way less than 17 hours from anywhere in Arizona.
    1 point
  8. Most popular questions: 1) So what do you do with X degree after you get your Ph.D.? (tempting answer: become a shamaness and guide the world after the apocalypse annihilates civilization) 2) Wow, why does X degree take so long? (tempting answer: I don't know, how long should it take to become familiar with everything written about the history of European Civilization in the past 50 years or so?) 3) Can you answer X random question about the Nazis? (tempting answer: #notallgermanhistorians) Please pardon the saltiness.
    1 point
  9. @Butterfly_effect thanks for posting this. Like you, I come from a humble background: my parents don't have college degrees, my grandparents were immigrants, and we often struggled financially while growing up. When I first started grad school, my mom was living in a trailer, and with my grad stipend, I was making significantly more money than her annually. I recently got my first car at 26, and it was a 20-year-old hand-me-down from my father after HE was able to get a slightly newer hand-me-down car from relatives. What surprised me most about grad school was that most of the other gra
    1 point
  10. I'm always surprised when I get this one. That's pretty presumptuous of people, but they don't seem to think so. Don't we all want supportive spouses?
    1 point
  11. Taking solid state and quantum mechanics. I'm also in a new subfield @eternallyephemeral, so we can definitely commiserate!
    1 point
  12. You got this! Its been a few years before I finished my last 2 years at the 4 year college and now I am pumped more than ever. My previous uni never offered these planetary geology courses so I am super excited. My family also does not give a crap about me being my school or they think I speak another language when I mention it! Only my husband, but hey that is what matters!
    1 point
  13. I moved to another country at the start of undergrad, and then transferred to another university (and a different major) back in the States a year later. I hated leaving uni in London to move back to the States: I loved the culture, the diversity, and I was worried that I would drift apart from my friends. Some of the relationships I formed in London haven't lasted, but I still talk almost daily with a few other friends I made while overseas. It's hard realizing what you're giving up to pursue academia. I cried a couple times and asked myself "what am I doing?" over and over again. I wen
    1 point
  14. plume

    New to the SLP World

    Sorry, I must not have read your post fully! The link I provided is a list of "leveling tracks," which integrate most prerequisites into the master's program. I am not sure of the most affordable prereq options, but most schools that offer master's degrees also offer 1-year post-bacc programs. I have heard that it is cheaper to take prerequisites on your own though, rather than entering a post-bacc program. Good luck!
    1 point
  15. About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a hea
    1 point
  16. Grades need not be inflated for everyone to get As -- especially in grad school. If everyone works hard and learns the material, they should all be rewarded with the As their hard work earned. In grad school, especially, where students are already supposed to be among the best, what is wrong with everyone doing well? If they could not succeed in grad school, they should have never been admitted. Don't hand out As like Halloween candy, but don't be afraid to give them either.
    1 point


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