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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/17/2016 in all areas

  1. Hello everyone, I have been a longtime lurker here and have not been active much since 2013 and 2015, when seeking advice for grad school application cycles. I applied only during one of those cycles (2013) and got into several schools. I did not receive any substantial financial aid and decided to look into building my professional resume before entering graduate school. I now work with a security organization in DC (originally from Midwest) and have been happy with my decision. I wanted to write to discuss with recent grads and fresh out of undergrad students about the urge/necessi
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  2. I'd say find at least 5 people you want to work with.
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  3. You guys! My washer and dryer just arrived! What wonderful machines and they're all mine! Of course the delivery guys left a sweaty smell in the air, but I can get rid of that. No more laundromat!
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  4. To reiterate what others have said, definitely submit your solo paper. As mentioned, if your other article is published and listed on your CV (or a publications list, if your application allows you to submit those specifically (some do)) then anyone on the committee can look it up if they're interested. Unlike @ultraultra I found that my writing sample was an important component of my application. I applied to 8 programs and got into 4. I was asked about my writing sample during two visits of three that I participated in, but I know it was a key factor for forth school that I didn't visit
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  5. I second everyone here with the umbrella programs! I applied to half interdisciplinary programs, and then the others were molecular biology and immunology. Long story short, I ended up working on metabolism with some immunology aspects, and I love this field. I wouldn't have gotten into this if I'd joined an immunology only program, and I've had way more opportunities in this interdisciplinary program. The other ones I know about allowed us to rotate in labs of faculty across different departments, meaning you could access faculty in both immunology and cancer bio. Feel free to message me abou
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  6. This stuff is incredibly confusing and I may not be 100% right on this. As far as I can tell it isn't about reciprocity. It's listing which states have extra or specialized requirements for licensure in the schools. When you graduate you have a degree and then start a CF. At some point (possibly before the CF? Or when getting your CCCs?) you need to be licensed in the state you are working in and that license may have specific requirements besides the masters' to work in certain settings. When I went to an open house last year for a program they were adamant about completing certain teaching
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  7. First of all, leave your parents out of it. They aren't the ones who have to go this school, you are. This isn't undergraduate where the school name recognition means something, Now it's your PI's name that matters, not the school. Secondly, don't judge by name recognition. While yes, some higher tier schools attract professors who have better output, there are a lot of excellent PIs at "lower tier" schools because they like the environment there better. Now that we got that out of the way, look at the list of schools you are considering. Which schools did you only look at because your pa
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  8. From your descriptions, two things come to mind: 1. It sounds like you are saying that you have a really strong need to be important/significant. For example, you feel disoriented when you aren't the foremost expert in your field in the room. You want to be unique/special in a romantic way to a potential partner. Being important / making a difference in a world is a common human need. I feel that your expression of this need is more extreme. Of course, it's your life and your choices, but may I suggest a slightly different perspective? You want your potential partner to have "otherworldly
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  9. Yeah. My point was that cog neuro people tend to have bio/chem backgrounds and not just psych backgrounds, so their GPAs might be lower. Clinical usually has the highest GPAs just because clinical is so insanely competitive. Although with sample sizes so small, this isn't always true. No problem! I think most schools look at applications holistically, and so research experience + strong letters of recommendation can make up for so-so scores, but if you're applying to really competitive places it may be more of a factor. I think it would be really interesting to see ho
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  10. nevermind

    Fall 2017 applicants

    If you want a solid guide to writing an email to a POI, read this: http://theprofessorisin.com/tag/how-to-write-an-email-to-a-professor/
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  11. Quickmick

    Fall 2017 applicants

    @rojano first of all, try to relax a little bit. If I wanted to meet someone, I didn't ask in the first email, but waited to see how my message was received. After that, if it looked like it was worth a trip, then I asked. What I did was have 3 dates that I knew worked for me...something like any Friday afternoon the rest of the month (or whatever) with the option of giving me dates if none of that worked. That way--if it suited them--the could just say Friday the blahblah. Seemed to make the planning easier without a lot of back and fourth regarding dates. If you are currently in Canada,
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  12. No, don't do this. It will give the impression that you are trying to seek an advantage by forming a direct connection with the admissions committee. What you could do instead, if it's the norm in your field, is to email professors who study the subject areas you would want to do your PhD with and let them know about your interest. This Skype meeting or phone call can also help you decide if you would get along with this person and can help you decide whether or not you would want to apply there. Don't bring up the admissions committee question and don't worry whether or not they are on i
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  13. Hi afgun_haund, Many Test Takers spend 3 months (or more) of consistent study time before they hit their 'peak' scores. Since you're still early-on in your studies, instead of thinking in terms of "how many more questions do I need to answer correct...", you should put your analysis into WHY you got questions wrong. While practice test review should be a bit more detailed than what I'm about to show you, here's an easy way to get started: After reviewing this MST, how many questions did you get wrong: 1) Because of a silly/little mistake? 2) Because there was so
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  14. I gained a lot of weight in school, but I didn't let it get me down!!! Good luck you guys, and stay true to yourselves!!!
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  15. This is just my two cents, but I think you need to love your body as you are, even if you do gain a few sizes in school. You are beautiful!!
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  16. Unless you are a total asshole in person, you should have your pick of schools. Your profile makes me incredibly jealous!
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  17. Hey, 2017 cycle peeps! I thought that I would make a general post here to just lay out some of my thoughts on applying to grad programs (to be clear PhD programs - not masters). I spent a lot of time comparing myself to other people on this website, and in retrospect, it didn't really do much good. However, here are some points that I picked up along the way that I think are worth sharing: GRE: try to get both the verbal and the quant section ~80th percentile for any school. Some highly competitive programs look for better, but I think this is a good rule of thumb. I had to take t
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  18. Maybe it's a good time for some of you guys to take a break and relax and come back in a few days.... These poor 2017 applicants are going to have to read through all of this.
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  19. If you are going to choose grad. school based on rankings with dubious methods you are going to have a bad time... You're better off looking at specific faculty ( and how productive they are), productivity and funding of dept. (again a bit hard to judge because funding situations are fluid). Look at how productive students in the program are and where their alumni have gone. Also to any future applicants reading this thread you have to take everything here with a grain of salt. Everything you see here is anecdotal based on ours and other's experiences. The only real concerns anyone should hav
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  20. I spent so much of my life trying to force myself to eat tiny amounts of super healthy food, while occasionally doing little baby aerobics work outs. It sucked. I never had enough willpower to reduce my calorie intake enough to maintain my weight, and I was extremely weak and stressed. Now I do intense workouts a few times a week and let myself eat whatever I want. I feel great, I'm the strongest I've been in years, and I've been dropping pounds steadily. I do strength workouts with weights now, instead of just using my body weight, and oh my god what a difference it's made in my muscle
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  21. I think I probably would have started studying for the GRE a lot earlier -- maybe the year before I knew I was going to take it. By the time I was satisfied at where my practice scores were, I only had one chance to complete an actual exam before January applications were due. Ending up with a respectable 166/160/4.0 was nice, but I think I'll probably end up taking it again when I apply for Ph.D. programs in a couple years. I also would have started preparing my personal statements, statements of purpose, and statements of intent a lot sooner. I think I'll start writing the batch that I int
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  22. I guess the take away message for future applicants would be: 1) if in doubt, contact PIs with a short email... It can't hurt and could potentially help a lot 2) if you are worried about annoying PIs as I was then it might be a good idea to ask the department secretary if they recommend contacting PIs. They will know whether it is normal in that department. Not contacting worked out well for me but rotations are common in my field so you don't come in with a designated PI already. Even still, I doubt it would have hurt anything to contact people and it could have helped. I may have reach
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  23. I recently had a friend (who is a Ph.D student at a top university) look over my SOP. She very honestly-but kindly-told me that essentially, my statement was just a repetition of what was in my resume. While reading a book on SOP's I discovered that this is one of the biggest mistakes that applicants make. Your essay is an introduction of you to the admissions committee, so you should write about what makes you, well..you! I think the most important question to respond to when writing an SOP (even though most schools don't explicitly ask this) is: Why should we choose you over all the o
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