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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/19/2017 in all areas

  1. https://www.buzzfeed.com/tracyclayton/stop-calling-women-females?utm_term=.dvW7DZ2vz#.wszZdPxe9
    3 points
  2. Don't do that. If you've taken the time to look up the grievances against Manning, then you've seen that she uses feminine pronouns. But, I understand your point and I tend to think in the same way. It makes a difference if it's an institutional issue or if it's a smaller division of the university.
    3 points
  3. TMP

    To outline or not

    In.... what context?
    2 points
  4. aina7

    HGSE 2018

    Hello, everyone! I am a devout gradcafe lurker, who has finally decided to apply to HGSE! I have attended two HGSE Diversity Recruitment evengs, and have talked to dozens of HGSE alumni, and I would like to share with you some of the info that I have collected over the years: - H is not "a perfect place but it is a special place" - Mohan Boodram, Assoc.Dean of Enrollment & Student Services - "H doesn't have outliners here. H has a home for everyone" - M. Boodram - Goal of HGSE Admissions office: fit is paramount. We want to make su
    2 points
  5. So, I'm sure you guys saw that Harvard took back their fellowship offer to Chelsea Manning. One commentator I was listening to said that we should all stop supporting Harvard, stop applying. They said that Harvard was effectively controlled by the government, because they listened to the criticism of the CIA. It got me thinking. Are there any schools you won't apply to because of something controversial they've done? Is it right to blame an entire institution? For example, with Charlottesville, are any of you not considering the University of Virginia because of the Neo-Nazi demonstrations? Or
    1 point
  6. Hello everyone! I am a senior with a psychology major and am currently applying to SLP grad schools for FALL 2018. I have a 3.7 GPA and will be taking the GRE this week, but am not feeling too confident about my math scores. I have a lot of research experience from psych, but not too much experience within the field of speech pathology (just 25 hours of me observing). I have strong letters of recommendation as well. Does anyone know any schools that do not require the GRE or seem like a good fit for me as a non major? Or if anyone has any tips in general! I would greatly appreciate
    1 point
  7. 1 point
  8. Tigla

    To outline or not

    Yes, I think outlines are a must. In my undergrad, I was able to wing it and write from my head fairly easily. My first grad paper, I tried to follow my typical routine and fell flat on my face. Since then, I have written a basic outline with the questions and some bullet points to remind myself what exactly I'm trying to demonstrate. By doing this little exercise before I write, I noticed that my arguments have become more refined and polished. In the end, it is up to you and you need to find the way(s) in which you write best and most effectively.
    1 point
  9. t_ruth

    Ph.D. Advice

    There are always conferences with deadlines coming up Get together with a few similarly-minded peers and put together a Google Sheet with conferences of interest and deadlines, locations, etc.
    1 point
  10. I absolutely love how supportive this community can be.
    1 point
  11. Something to consider that I'm running into now. If you would like to apply for external funding for your PhD after your MA, the NSF graduate student research (grant, fellowship...don't remember the official title) is only for graduating seniors and graduate students in their first year of grad school. It is possible you will be unable to get funding through NSF to help offset the cost of a PhD program (external sources of funding can make you look pretty good as an applicant). That being said, I also did a terminal MA and it helped quite a bit by giving me research, presentation, and pub
    1 point
  12. I did a standalone MA (in interdisciplinary social sciences, not specifically Anthropology) before starting my PhD and I think it has been useful so far. Doing the MA first helped me to formulate more concrete research interests which was nice for PhD applications. It was also helpful in that I had the opportunity to write a thesis and do a few conference presentations, which provided me with better writing samples than anything I would have had applying straight out of undergrad. Spending an additional two years in grad school before starting a doctoral program was certainly a pain in the
    1 point
  13. The main downsides are the additional time it will take. But, it sounds like you already have compelling reasons to do a MA first. If you can find funding, the research experience you gain during a MA program can definitely make you a more desirable applicant for PhD programs.
    1 point
  14. Calgary is a strong program. Their business school also has several I/Os, and they work closely with psych folks.
    1 point
  15. hj2012

    Choosing PhD Topic

    While long-term thinking is good, you should also consider the likelihood of reaching your most immediate goal, which is acceptance to a fully-funded PhD program in the United States. Not to be a total party pooper, but what you've written thus far does not inspire confidence that you understand what is required to gain acceptance to these highly selective programs. First, PhD programs -- at least in the U.S. context, with which I am more familiar -- do not take students and train them from scratch. That is, if you don't already have training in statistics and mathematical modeling, it is
    1 point
  16. It's possible to study Kierkegaard in either a philosophy or religious studies department. The philosophy route, however, would require application to a limited number of programs since there would have to be an actual Kierkegaard scholar, or at least someone with a strong secondary interest in Kierkegaard, in the department in order to be accepted. That's not necessarily the case with religious studies, which is more interdisciplinary. If the proposed project is really strong and there are faculty with expertise in 19th century philosophy/theology more generally, they might take on a student
    1 point
  17. I did exactly this, started my PhD in my mid-30s as a single childless woman in a cohort where most other students are about a decade younger. What helped me the most was going in knowing that my cohort or even my department wouldn't meet all of my social needs. I do sometimes socialize with my cohort because they are nice people and can actually be fun, but after spending so many hours with them each week I really don't desire to hang with them all the time outside of that. I figured being at a large public university I'd be able to connect with grad students in other departments that migh
    1 point
  18. If students are too young for you, you might try to find events that target postdocs and junior faculty, who are more likely to be in the right age-range for you. Not all events will be open to grad students, but some social events might be.
    1 point
  19. AP

    Starting PhD...in 30s?

    One of the best options in that case is attending as many mixers and events as you can. I live in a place with several colleges and universities so I cannot completely relate. Yet, I was in my early 30s when I started grad school and I met my bf in a grad school event (he was a postdoc in another department, nothing to do with my discipline so it was the only way our paths could have crossed). Also, getting a campus job that has high interaction with people may also help! Edit: I realized you were not looking for suggestions, but these are the thoughts I've got right now...
    1 point
  20. hats

    2018 Applicants

    @punctilious Can I ask what parts of this program research your husband is planning to do? I get that literature students switch fields and topics a lot more often than anthropologists do, so it can make sense to go to a program with generally "good Americanists" for a master's degree (or possibly for a PhD if you want to focus on teaching? I'm not sure, I'm in a different field) but it doesn't sound like that's your husband's situation. It sounds like he really likes literary scholarship, it isn't something he's just okay about while he gets to his dream of teaching college students. And that
    1 point
  21. It can be really hard to sort through those posts because there are SO many responses in a thread. I think it's nice to have a thread about this all together for future applicants. Anyways, when I reached out to POIs, I erred on the side of professionalism. That means says "dear" at the start, as awkward as that feels. Here's a sort of template to go by: "Dear So and So, I am a (enter here: graduate of, undergrad/graduate student at, etc.) studying (enter major/specialization) and I am considering applying to doctoral programs this fall. My interest(s) is(are) XYZ, and afte
    1 point
  22. hj2012

    2018 Applicants

    Non-fiction programs - especially full-residency programs with stipends - are absolutely not receiving fewer applications than PhD programs. Wisconsin-Madison's numbers are not outliers. Creative nonfiction programs are extremely competitive, as the opportunity to have 3 years to work on a book project is very compelling even to professional journalists, editors, and writers. For example, I have a friend who recently transitioned from a full-time job as an investigative reporter to an MFA program with far less prestige than the Iowa Writer's Workshop. She has years of experience, an excellent
    1 point
  23. It's hard to say what exactly got me in, but if I were going to try to help someone shooting for humanities PhD programs, what seemed to work for me was: - I built relationships with professors during undergrad. This is the single biggest thing that I think helped me get into grad school. When I found a professor I liked, I tried to take multiple classes with them so that they could get to know my work and style. I did a summer abroad intensive with one prof. I was a paid reader for another prof. I stayed in touch with other professors and asked questions about their subjects when it was r
    1 point
  24. Though my POI have mentioned some of the things they liked in my application, I find it difficult to conduct a post-mortem on my season. For privacy's sake, I'm hesitant to specify the programs I applied to, but I was accepted at three of the five schools I applied to (and every program I applied to was in the top 15, regardless of what ranking you use). I'm inclined to think that this fortune is the result of sheer dumb luck or the inane superstitious things I did to get me through February (I started seeing signs in the crossword puzzles I did to relax). But here are the things I think helpe
    1 point


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