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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/09/2018 in all areas

  1. It really depends on the subfield. I can say that hardly any of the faculty in my subfield (broadly "ancient history") have a PhD from an "history department." Most come from religion/religious studies, classics/classical studies, or ancient (near eastern) studies. But you move even close to "medieval history" and a PhD in history seems to be common, if not the expectation. I wouldn't focus too much on subfields that are not your own. The info below your name says you're in American Religious History, which I know basically nothing about as a discipline (post this in the history subforum, too?
    2 points
  2. I'd echo sacklunch by saying that this is really subfield dependent and that having an ongoing conversation with your advisor(s) is really important. I'll say it is generally true that religious studies departments are more friendly to people who have a PhD in a different field, but the reverse is rarely true. Philosophy and history departments are especially "title protective" in this regard--they really only hire people with PhDs in their field. It's also true though that those departments tend to care very little about religion qua religion (whatever that really means). Ironically, per
    1 point
  3. That's a different matter altogether and neither here nor there. As a graduate student, your aim needs to be to write articles that can get published in peer-reviewed journals, not to unsettle the assumption that only single-authored publications are the goal. As a graduate student, you have limited time and resources. You need to make the most of that time so you can put yourself in a good position for the job market. Again, same idea applies. Edited book volumes are nice, but they do not carry the same weight as an article in a peer-reviewed journal when one is on the job mark
    1 point
  4. Your profile seems like it'd be in the conversation anywhere you apply. Do you have a list in mind?
    1 point
  5. This is the right advice. Widen your scope beyond what you think "makes sense" (within reason - don't apply to places where absolutely none of your interests are pursued.) Anecdata: the PhD I'm entering in the fall & and the 3 faculty members I'll likely work the most closely with -- One has a similar transnational/historical methodology to mine but works in a related but very different region. One has a similar interest in diasporic literature but focuses on another related but largely different region and looks at media I don't currently consider. One has a hemispheri
    1 point
  6. Yes! I totally agree that people should generally resist and avoid adjuncting, as it's become a huge problem and is exploitative. We had a guest lecture talk to one of my classes about this very issue last year, and he said that the only way he thinks we can change the adjunct situation is if people flat-out refuse to do them, because then universities will be faced with a crisis and may have to consider offering more secure positions (perhaps that's an optimistic view; in my pessimistic view, I'm sure they'd find some other way to exploit labor). But, I digress... Discussions of a
    1 point
  7. Lots of good advice on this thread. (I can personally attest to @Rabbit Run's wealth of knowledge on this subject- he was really helpful to me when I was in the application cycle). I'm at PTS for the MDiv right now and it sounds like it would be a good fit for you, at least based on the info you shared. PM me if you wish to speak further about it. Also, if you're interested in the Presbyterian route, Union Pres could be a good fit. There are several students here who visited and loved it there; their funding and faculty have a good reputation.
    1 point
  8. Exactly this! The mentors in my program told me to choose a PhD program based on faculty who are interested in my work and who can offer some expertise, though not necessarily know every single thing about it. For example, if you're in comp/rhet and you want to study writing program administration, it's good to have faculty in your program who have knowledge, experience, scholarship, etc. in that general area. They may not be experts in the exact WPA area you study (maybe they work on first-year writing administration and you want to focus on capstone courses or something), but they should be
    1 point
  9. No, your friends should not do that. They don't need more teaching experience. They probably need more money and should do what @a_sort_of_fractious_angel did. Adjuncting is horribly exploitative and should be avoided if at all possible, not just for their sake but for the profession's sake as a whole. And as @a_sort_of_fractious_angel points out, additional teaching experience will NOT help their application.
    1 point
  10. Today, I sent the first draft of my lit review chapter to my supervisor. Yay! I am also going to a free outdoor concert tonight.
    1 point
  11. I don't have ideas about departments, other than to suggest you like at Communications, Anthropology, and English departments as possible options. That said, wanting to start in Spring 2019 puts you off the traditional US graduate admissions cycle for a PhD program, which make both being admitted and getting funding much less likely.
    1 point
  12. hi there, I can only speak from my experience at SFSU, but there are people there strong in social/political phil as well as feminist phil. Three faculty members come to mind, which is the perfect number for a committee for a MA thesis (req'd at SFSU). Feel free to send any questions my way, and good luck.
    1 point
  13. While each case is different, and I don't know much about the field of Sociology, in general, a high GRE can counter-act a poor gpa. However, what's more important is which portion of the GRE you score well on. For Sociology, I would assume scoring strongly on the Verbal and AW is more important than scoring well on the Quant section.
    1 point
  14. Fellow Washingtonian here! I definitely think strong GRE scores (especially for a PhD program) will help out your lower GPA. Just put everything you have out there!
    1 point
  15. I think your Q is a bit low. I am majoring in Literature and I have the same Quant.
    1 point
  16. Daniel998

    SLP Post-Bacc

    Have you considered online options? ENMU has a leveling and 2nd bachelors degree option. USU has a 2nd bachelors degree program for SLP hopefuls. ENMU was the cheaper option between the two so I left USU as it was getting a little too expensive for me. I believe it is ~250 a unit at ENMU so about 750 a course if you are listed as a leveler. Dr. Swift is really supportive as well. Northridge also has an online post-bacc program I believe. Hope you get into both LA and Fullerton. Best of luck
    1 point
  17. Hi, karish11! I'll likely be completing a handful prerequisites this upcoming year, so I've been looking into post-bacc/leveling options myself. If you're open to taking classes on-line, I've found Utah State's post-bacc to be the top recommended program on these forums. People also seem to dig Longwood, Vermont, and Idaho as on-line options. Portland State and University of Washington have been the most talked-about on-campus options. I've seen you around the forums, so I'm sure you already know this, but for the sake of lurkers and other future applicants: each of these programs has
    1 point
  18. Nah. The fact that the email was sent anonymously--and from a fake account, no less--means that it's not worth dignifying or thinking about. If we're going to teach our students anything about post-college life, we have to stress that integrity is key. If you can't make a complaint in person or under your real name, you can't expect an audience to respond to your problems. You can't expect people to drop everything to come and troubleshoot your issues when you refuse to air those issues under your real identity. The OP used their computer to fact check the lecture and check wor
    -1 points


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