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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/24/2018 in all areas

  1. Well, I promised myself if I ever got into grad school I would post on gradcafe to help others out there that are trying to as well. Hopefully this information inspires you to pursue your dream of becoming an SLP. Back story: When I was younger, I was diagnosed with a learning disability (auditory and visual processing). I always had to try harder in school than the average student. I went to community college after high school because I wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I always had a liking working with kids. In the back of my mind, I always knew I wanted to be a teacher, but I hated s
    1 point
  2. uncannywriter

    Samford University

    Hello, For those considering Samford University, I advise you with caution. The program is in crisis and there are a lot of concerns with the development of the program. I understand the stress of getting into an SLP program, I have been there and the struggle is REAL! Therefore, I know a class with be guaranteed for next semester. I do want to warn you. The program has recently lost 6 students in two semesters. They started with 23 and now only have 17. When you arrive for your interview they will inform you that they want you and they care about you. They will also sell you a line about
    1 point
  3. No. PhDs train you to do research. JDs train you to do law. The two are not the same thing. @ZeChocMoose not in legal academia, but a friend of mine who is says the credential needed to teach law school is called the JSD.
    1 point
  4. Honestly, without asking the students of those professors, there is really no way of knowing what kind of feedback you will get. Your adviser's list are people s/he knows who will do his/her job dutifully of providing appropriate criticism and approving your thesis. Your own list is also worth considering and sharing with your adviser. Your adviser may know some of those people and had chosen not to share those names for particular reasons (won't be a close reader, gives no positive feedback, too busy, etc.). Just pick a name. The worst that happens is that the person says no, and you
    1 point
  5. No. I am assuming you mean that you want to use your J.D. to be a professor in one of those subjects? That is not how it works. You need a PhD in one of those fields or a closely related one to being able to secure a tenure track position. Even then - you would not be competitive unless you had teaching experience, publications, possibly grant-funded research, great references from well-known scholars, etc. It is very difficult to get a tenure-track position! The easiest thing at this point if you want to be a professor would be look into job postings for TT professors and instructors
    1 point
  6. You can never know whether your examiners are harsh or not until after they examined your thesis. That said, if it is an internal examiner, you may get some ideas from previous students who got their theses marked by that examiner. If I were you, I would not worry whether the examiner is internal or external, but the expertise of the examiner. Examiners who are renowned for your field and have examined a lot of theses before will most likely have realistic expectations to a master thesis. So go for big professors in your field. I did not pick my examiners for my PhD. My advisors di
    1 point
  7. PsychBoy

    Vanier 2018-2019

    absolutely! I didn't even have two pages.
    1 point
  8. I agree with @t_ruth and @ZeChocMoose: finding academics whose research you're interested in and working backwards to the universities is a good way to get started! You might try reading abstracts in the Journal of Early Intervention, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, and Early Childhood Education Journal. If you find something you like and want to read more, researchers will sometimes make their articles available on ResearchGate or provide full copies upon request. If you're interested in a SPED focus, you might try looking at publications coming out of Vanderbilt, Kansas, UT Aust
    1 point
  9. With that age group I think you will have more luck with Dev Psych programs than with Ed programs--unless you were interested in early childhood policy. I can PM you a name or two.
    1 point
  10. Totally, I have the same thing. I remember even in undergrad, at an admitted students day, this guy came up, I think he was an adcom, and started off with something along the lines of, "Congratulations. And no, don't worry, you really were admitted to Berkeley--no one will come yank you out of your English class. There was no mistake, I promise--you deserve to be here." The whole room burst our in laughter. I think a lot of people feel this way, especially when getting into higher-ranking schools. I feel like I've had it throughout the process... like, I felt like my GRE was a fluke and I
    1 point
  11. As a fellow old ABD (I think @jrockford27 and I started around the same time?) I want to second all of this advice, but I also want to reassure you that you really don't need to be an expert in your potential field when you apply. That's what the whole experience is for! That said, your need to interrogate and expand your own knowledge base is something that will absolutely serve you well through the process. I don't think it's possible to be truly engaged in the process without constantly looking for ways to refine your goals and writing, and I think a good SOP shows that more than anything.
    1 point
  12. This is not even unique to graduate school. I've said this before; it's still true: You're not good enough to be in graduate school. No one is good enough to be in graduate school. There is no great platonic abstract of "good enough" which, if obtained, opens the path to tenure with a choir of angels. Everyone's a failure. Everyone is faking it. No one knows what they're doing. Usually, we call this "adulthood". Being shit at something is a necessary first step towards being good at something. "Talent" and "natural ability" are bullshit terms that mask the absurd amounts of hard wor
    1 point
  13. It seems like you have possibly already made a decision, but just to toss another couple of pennies into the pile: I've always had a dog, and I don't know how I would live without one. There are a lot of things that you need to adapt to in order to have one, but after a while, you don't even notice. Some things to consider: -Having a dog means asking potential landlords "Do you allow dogs" as your FIRST question. The answer will eliminate at least half of the potential rentals. -Dogs are expensive. In addition to regular vetting, there is food, toys, damage, grooming, emerg
    1 point
  14. SLP112494

    Re-taking CSD courses?

    I feel like it depends on the programs you are applying to and the area you are looking at! I am from the NJ/NY/PA/D.C area and got into schools in all 3 states with a 3.2 GPA and average GRE Scores after waiting a year. I worked for a year, had killer recs and a personal statement, and CALLED the departments on a biweekly basis as well as emailed the programs to show to show my continued interest. Some programs look at students more holistically than others. I applied to 10 schools and got into 2 of them, then waitlisted at 5 (3 of which I got a yes from after frequent follow ups). Pers
    1 point
  15. Alice, I'll try answering your questions from above, being that I am bilingual and were accepted to a few bilingual programs/research labs. 1. Is this GPA really just hopeless? I have seen so many people who have their GPAs around 3.3 and do not get any offer. Would it be a better option if I just delay my graduation for another year, and re-take more classes and get more experience? (that will not help my GPA by too much though. My school does not take out my former grades after I re-take courses) I had a GPA lower than a 1.0 when I first started college .... I took a break fo
    1 point
  16. I am not able to answer all of your questions, but some programs do require a second language and those ones typically have less applications, probably giving you a better chance for admissions. For example, the University of Utah offers a MS and a MA, the MA requires you to have a second language. I'm not sure of other schools that do the same, but I'm sure there are some. You should definitely talk about your unique experience in your personal statement!
    1 point
  17. Tall Chai Latte

    4th year

    It's been a while since I blogged on the gradcafe. Last time I blogged, I was in the midst of the never-ending rotation streak, and it felt like I would never manage to land anywhere in the program. My program is an umbrella program, I rotated through FOUR DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS! Well, I did find a lab home to stay, passed my prelim and became a candidate, and now arrived in the middle of my fourth year. Many research-related ups and downs happened, projects initiated and terminated, and time went by really fast -- It only seemed yesterday that I was fretting over how to find an advisor at all.
    1 point


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