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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/11/2018 in all areas

  1. I got in!!!!!! Online Part time Laurier MSW!!!!! Finally the wait is over! I’ll be declining my offer to Windsor, good luck to those on the wait list!
    4 points
  2. 3 points
  3. Got an email at 7am this morning that I was accepted to Laurier's online MSW for September! Good luck to those still waiting.
    2 points
  4. This is my second time applying for grad school and it would be my third time taking the test. I just can't seem to get the questions right, both quant and verbal. Out of the 10 verbal questions I solved, I got 2 questions right. I'm following magoosh 90day plan and i'm already two-three weeks behind because I have hard time focusing and it takes me forever to find answers to the questions. And when I do, I get the questions wrong, so I go back and spend too much time trying to understand wth I did wrong. This isn't rewarding at all. My scores always have been and it still is
    1 point
  5. I did Lakehead's 1-year HBSW and remember the application process as being quite daunting. From what I recall, your average should still meet their requirements. Marks definitely aren't everything though, I worked hard on my resume, had strong references, and spent a lot of time preparing for the personal statement exam. It all paid off in the end. I also don't think the competition is as fierce as the application may lead one to believe, although I'm sure it varies year to year. If you have any questions about the program feel free to reach out.
    1 point
  6. Louly

    SLP major with a 3.19

    2.8 overall, 3.8 last 60 credits, low GRE but great references, personal statement and experience. ---Accepted into 4 programs. Stats don't always represent a person as a whole. Good Luck!
    1 point
  7. I emailed the person and it turns out that, on a year-to-year basis, they sometimes accept GREs that are up to 5 years old, but that that is a decision for the admissions director, who has yet to be determined for the coming cycle. I'll let you folks know if I hear anything more.
    1 point
  8. If you have 10 years experience, you're in a different category. The standard policy programs are for people with 2-5 years experience, whereas people with your level of experience tend to go for executive programs. That said, without knowing what your experience is, with 10 years of policy (not admin assistant, not random barista job) experience, you are competitive anywhere.
    1 point
  9. Shd90

    MPH Canada 2018

    Yes there is. Let's connect on fb and I will add you to it. ?
    1 point
  10. Wow! My head is swimming in all this excellent advice. Thanks, all, for commenting. Several of my professors also suggested applying to all the programs I can afford and can make time for tailoring apps. Luckily, I'm in the position finance-wise and time-wise to apply to all 18-ish schools on my list (after several more rounds of vetting, of course). @FreakyFoucault Thanks for the welcome and for all the suggestions! You have put my mind at ease regarding the GRE (at least, for now). And as for the money talk, I see now that the return on investment of applying to more schools greatly out
    1 point
  11. I am still hanging on but I am trying to see if I can find a full time job in the field for now.
    1 point
  12. Duuuuuude. I graduated undergrad in 2004, and I'll be finishing my PhD around age 39. Most of the people starting the PhD program at my school are in their 30s. Looking in this forum, a good chunk of folks are in their 30s, with a handful 40s+. Doing a PhD/academia as a second career is very, very common. Basically, don't let being in your late 20s stop you if that's what you want. You would certainly not be the oldest person in your PhD cohort, if you go that route. And it's probably a good idea to not say you're "too old" to do something in a mixed audience, since there will certa
    1 point
  13. @juilletmercredi Thank you for validating my feelings. It is very exhausting: instead of wondering how to make my science better, I am wondering about which parts of my skin I should cover and which parts are "safe" to show.
    1 point
  14. Heart react for support/solidarity.
    1 point
  15. I suggest looking into Learning Sciences programs, which are buried under Educational Psychology, Education, Instructional Technology, and other related programs. Learning Sciences is all about the theories of teaching and learning, and of course, people specialize in higher education (as I've found, undergrads are easy participants to get on a university campus!). I study how to enhance teaching and learning with ed technology in higher education, but in STEM. However, I do know that social science/humanities work in higher ed does exist! It's just hard to find because there's so much more gr
    1 point
  16. All of the higher ed programs that I am familiar with tend to research teaching and learning focused on the STEM disciplines. Depending on what definition of STEM that you are using that also includes social science fields such as sociology, political science, economics, and psychology. (FYI- higher ed programs are more than just higher ed leadership. There are at least 10-15 programs that focus on research about the field of higher education) It does sound like examining PhD programs in either higher ed, curriculum & instruction, or joint programs in education and a social science/
    1 point
  17. My graduate institution (and most of the schools I applied to for my master's) had a certificate program for PhD students in college teaching & learning. Courses/seminars I saw for that certificate were a foundations in college teaching, inclusive teaching, evidence based teaching, active learning in STEM, using digital tools, course development, and college student learners. This program also had several short seminars and one time workshops that counted for credit. Not sure if this is similar to what you're looking for, but in the programs I applied to this type of thing was geared towar
    1 point
  18. Sometimes postdocs are not advertised well or at all so networking can be a key component to securing one. So attending conferences, presenting your research, getting to know faculty outside of your school, etc. can be really helpful on the job market. Also use your dissertation committee and their networks to the best of your ability. They may be aware of additional opportunities/research groups/grants that may be of interest. In terms of preparation - I would just keep doing what you are doing to secure a TT position. Oh, and also have a viable plan B in case you are not successful
    1 point
  19. I would totally second everything said by the other posters. It sounds like you are a very ambitious, very young person who has been accelerating things for a while and you don't feel like you will be able to compete. My senior year of college I was a bit like a (less academically successful) version of you: I was looking at the competition and I spent too much time looking at forums where it seemed like all of the applicants are Ivy League graduates with 3.9+ GPAs, very high math subject test GRE scores, meaningful research, straight A's in graduate coursework, letters from famous professor
    1 point


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