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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/30/2018 in all areas

  1. I would like to provide some information regarding the reality of getting admitted to top 5 ranked Canadian graduate schools in the Computer Science Program. I work in the field and it appears to me that many applicants are not aware of some of the basic requirements to be admitted that are not overtly stated but definitely required. Unfortunately, I am unable to reveal my university or position as I wish to remain anonymous. Most of the time, you MUST have previous degree from a top school of your country, especially for students with a degree outside of Canada/USA/UK. This is extreme
    1 point
  2. Does anyone have any advice/experience with disclosing a mental health condition or chronic illness to an adviser? I have schizophrenia and it is very well-managed, but I was thinking I might let my adviser know in case I happen to have any relapses in symptoms. I am an incoming Master's student for Fall 2018. I have been stable for two years now - I take my medication, go to therapy, and see a psychiatrist on a monthly basis, and this has gotten me through the graduate school application process without any issues. I understand graduate school will be challenging, which is why I'm asking
    1 point
  3. jheytvelt

    Rensselaer - Fall 2018

    Hi everyone, didn't see an RPI thread, so decided to post this. I'll be starting my PhD in Electrical Engineering this fall. I'd like to talk to other incoming grad students, maybe create a WhatsApp group?
    1 point
  4. OHSP

    Applications 2019

    This is a good start but I'm not sure I come away with any sense of what you're really, really interested in, in terms of questions. Don't worry about claiming to have any answers yet, instead show readers that you can formulate a historical question.
    1 point
  5. I called MoMA three weeks ago to make sure my application went through since I didn't get the automated response. The internship coordinator told me that at that point half of the departments have already chosen their "final candidates" and all the departments were expected to decide who they would take by the last Friday, July 27. I assume the museum has already sent out offers to those "final candidates" and is waiting for their acceptance (or decline). There's always a hope for sure until you get a rejection email, but changing gears towards some other opportunities might be more realistic
    1 point
  6. This may sound silly or redundant, but looking back I wish I knew that there are absolutely NO stupid questions. Ask questions while you are still expected to be learning! Also keep positive rapport and good relationships with the professors and supervisors you will have in the future-- it pays off and goes a long way in our field! You will need them someday and they can also learn so much from you. ? Best of luck to you!
    1 point
  7. AP

    Applications 2019

    I agree with @Sigaba's questions. Especially, I think it's important for you to argue why this is a good project for a PhD in history and not in anthropology. Historicizing recent events tend to demand methods from Anthro. I am not saying this is not a good project, but a friend of mine had this question raised over and over again because he too dealt with recent events and their roots in the late 1970s. Don't let them wander.* Your third sentence looks important but it is very week. It has "became" as a verb (weak verb), it's too long, and it has a long list after a sentence with another
    1 point
  8. I'm starting in September. Interested to chat with someone about their plans for graduation timeline etc. I'm in Cogs PhD though.
    1 point
  9. IT’S DONE! I finally got the GRE over with. I’m not the happiest with my score, but I feel as though it’s good enough to not get my applications automatically thrown out... anyways, time to try to relax and read a bit the rest of the summer!
    1 point
  10. E-P

    4 Year fully funded PhD in the USA?

    With respect, I think you might be approaching it from the wrong angle. Generally, the reason to do a PhD is to research. You can't do the research that you're interested in in all places. Therefore, you have to first figure out your research interests, then find out what universities have similar programs and professors doing that. Then, you figure out admissions requirements. So the real question is: What are you wanting to research, and where can you do that?
    1 point
  11. I have not taken these, but I have worked on the Judaism module twice now. It gives a lot of good and well-resourced information, both broad historical overview and close studies of specific texts. The students who participate as much as they can on the forums, interacting with the material, one another, and the teaching staff, seem to learn a lot. In terms of the amount of content, it's probably comparable to reading a "Introduction to X" book on the topic aimed at the mass market, though with a lot more interactivity. Two things to note: the series focuses on scriptures, so most of the
    1 point
  12. Based on how many chemistry classes you've taken? You're definitely over thinking it.
    1 point
  13. Agree with others that you should register with the disability office of your school, and that you should disclose vaguely. Unfortunately, schizophrenia is a mental illness that is highly stigmatized and often labeled as craziness. Unless your advisor happens to know this illness well enough, e.g. someone close to him/her has the illness, it is best to avoid a full disclose. Something alone the line like "a chronic medical condition that may relapse in future", like @lemma said, would give enough information for your advisor to know that you may be unwell at some stage. It would be better to d
    1 point
  14. My advice is not to disclose immediately; unfortunately, there is a lot of stigma and misunderstanding surrounding mental health, so I suggest that you get to know your advisor a bit and build a relationship with them first. Let them get to know you and form an opinion based on your personality, knowledge, and skills, not your health. Of course, if you run into a situation where your health requires attention and it is affecting your performance, you may need to disclose something a little sooner than desired, such as mentioning that you have a health condition that you are managing. How much
    1 point
  15. Congrats on getting the schizophrenia under control and working hard on your health! I have a condition with some shared symptoms, and I elected to not tell my supervisors, but I did register with the disability office. I also had to take time off during undergrad due to some major episodes, and am also doing much better these days, but I knew that doing nothing wasn't an option, because if I relapsed I wouldn't be in a state to organize accommodations. I have had a really good experience with the disability office, and I recommend seeking them out and getting registered. They can act on
    1 point
  16. Good compilation of advice from early career faculty to new grad students. @Gradslack compiled the questions and asked them to the @NewPi_Slack community via Twitter, then compiled the answers. Nice range of topics from keeping up with literature, preparation for becoming a PI, and the perennial favorite of dealing with imposter syndrome https://gradstudentslack.wordpress.com/blog/
    1 point
  17. Just got through to the PI I want to work for which is such a huge relief and she would be excited to have me so I'm going to my top choice! Sorry for the freak out - I still honestly have no idea what I would've done if I hadn't heard back from her.
    1 point
  18. You don't mention your discipline, so this may be off base. But in the sciences, you are largely being paid to forward the goals of the PI and the lab, and being asked to help with another students project is absolutely par for the course. It would not at all be considered blackmail to get the sort of email you cite in any lab I'm familiar with, it would be considered a reprimand to a graduate student who's not living up to the expectations of the PI and department. The latter part, the request that you spend at least a few hours in lab every afternoon is also worrying to me, as
    1 point
  19. My department has not been as politicky as some, but here's some general advice for the first year (and beyond, really): Try not to say bad things about people. Anyone. Even if it seems like the person you're talking to won't care or won't know the person under discussion It's much better to avoid those tricky, facepalming faux pas moments than attempt to fix them once the words have escaped your mouth. Also, people may love gossip but they don't always feel the greatest when they realize that you might be spilling dirt on them at some point. Listen more than you speak. Without goi
    1 point
  20. 1) definitely budget well for first few months. moving, getting an apartment, buying textbooks, and waiting until the end of the month for your first paycheck sucks. hard. 2) you will have less time than you think. even though you've been warned that it's a lot of work, it's still more work than you think it is. get used to 60+ hours of work a week. 3) you'll have to schedule your fun time. i hate planning my fun, but without doing that, it turns out i never have time for fun. at a certain point, you need to accept that you're not going to finish X tonight and just go grab a beer. 4)
    1 point
  21. A lot of good stuff has already been said, so here's my take. The first year will, almost always, suck. So, find a way to make it suck less. Figure out which work *has* to be done and which work doesn't, then work accordingly. Make friends with your cohort, or at least some of them, so you have someone to talk to during breaks in class. Remember that you don't have to be best buddies with any of them. In fact, it's probably better if you aren't. Either find a new hobby or stick with an existing one. Write it into your schedule so that it happens. I recommend something that incorporates exer
    1 point
  22. I concur with a lot of the advice that has been given, so I won't repeat it. Something that hasn't been directly discussed is learning the difference between undergrad and grad school. It is monumental. I didn't go through the whole application process to get into my master's program so you all are probably further ahead than I was straight out of undergrad. I had a vague understanding that graduate school was about research but I didn't really truly get it until I was in my current program for 3/4s of a year. I have been told many times: if there comes a time when you have to choose betwe
    1 point


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