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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/12/2018 in all areas

  1. I would submit your score. Since it is not required a lot of students probably will not submit their scores because they do not have to, this could be used to your advantage. If you and another applicant are head to head and they did not submit their scores you most likely will get picked because you go up and beyond what is required and two they have another way to see how "perform" . I would also submit it if you are applying for funding as well. Most GRE scores are there to weed out people if it is required. Since your program does not require them they might not even look at them until it
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  2. The verbal and writing scores are pretty high and I expect the program will look at those two rather than the quant. Does the application say not required but preferred?
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  3. 1 point
  4. I think this is acceptable, and actually good practice for graduate school, where you sometimes have to email academics you don’t know (potential outside committee members, big names you want to meet at a conference, journal editors). You want to be polite (perhaps even acknowledging the awkwardness of the situation), but treat them like a future colleague. I would also make sure to email a graduate student in your sub-field, who will generally be able to give the most helpful answers to any question, and explain why you reached out to them in particular. If I were on the receiving end of this
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  5. The third person applying for developmental psych PhD in this thread. I'm currently soooo stressed on my application. I just sent the first round of emails to PIs a few days ago. Currently haven't finalized my PS and hasn't even started to fill in the application. I have three professors who agreed to write LOR for me but I haven't asked them yet to start write them. I spent the whole summer and the early September on a very difficult EEG project (had to learn a lot of math, realize a very novel algorithm in code, do statistics, make posters and do presentations) that's why I started so late.
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  6. Just a clarificatory note: You said (per the link to Leiter's blog) that Michigan is only placing 20% of their grads. The figure from Leiter is actually that Michigan is placing 20% of their students into PhD-granting institutions. I feel quite confident that the percentage of students placed into full-time jobs at colleges of all kinds is quite a bit higher.
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  7. I generally agree, and I certainly think OP shouldn't be freaking out about it. But there certainly are some schools that actually do see GRE and will likely reject you if it's below their threshold. Those schools often mention their score range (for example, one of the programs I know clearly states that they rarely accept students with 95 percentile or lower on Verbal on their admission website), so it would be a good idea for him or her to check the websites. Also, if a program states an average GRE for their accepted students and if your score is a lot lower than that (e.g., another p
    1 point
  8. The GRE really isn't that critical. They'll look at it, sure, but it won't discount your 4.0 or your experience. They say GRE scores can only help, not hurt you. That being said, if you can take it again, no reason why not. A month is plenty to study and take it again. If you're going to retake it, make sure you take a bunch of timed, online practice tests, and practice your vocab. Just remember that it isn't the most important thing on your application.
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  9. It takes about 10 days (or we can say 14 days, just to be safe) to get the official score, and ETS claims that it will take appx. 5 business days after sending the report. So we can say you gotta give 15 to 20 days before the deadline. That being said, I do think you can take another month to study for GRE, but not more than a month. Also, I've known some people reaching out to the school and asking if they can submit a new GRE score after the deadline. And some of them got a positive response, some of them didn't. So I'd suggest that you contact the programs you're going to apply and as
    1 point
  10. AfricanusCrowther

    Applications 2019

    Not if the citation is logical and appropriate.
    1 point
  11. Submitted my first application today!
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  12. In other news, I submitted my first application today!
    1 point
  13. Warelin

    September Top Posters

    I think we're in an era of a lot of changes coming to grad schools. Policies are changing due to changes in USA law. Some schools are dropping GRE requirements or are in the middle of revamping how they choose who to admit or how their curriculum to work. Many of us remain active in our own forums. On the Literature forum, there wasn't much of ad admin presence in the past; now there is.There are other forums that lacked much of an admin presence but now have one. I'm wondering if the reason you feel that we're less active is because we're active on different forums? While the previous ad
    1 point
  14. It is common to have problems settling in for the very first semester. No need to feel embarrassed. You are definitely not the only one, even if you feel this way. You will not be the first student who has ever gone to the graduate advisor for matter like this. He has seen that enough to not think you less of it. So basically, tell him what you wrote here, that you are struggling to catch up with your physics course. Tell him that you have tried meeting with the professor to clarify but you lack the background to understand the lectures. He should be able to point you in the right direction, e
    1 point
  15. Hello Team! Good to be back! This is my second year applying to grad schools. Last year I was directing a full length during applications, so I only applied to Yale. I got an interview, so that was promising, but was rejected after that. This year I am planning on applying to Brown, Columbia, Northwestern, with a side trip to URTAS in Chicago. I am approaching this year with a little more confidence in myself and a stiffer upper lip for inevitable rejection (easy to say now). Starting a little slow this year, but hoping to jump into drafting and compiling tomorrow. Eek!
    1 point
  16. I also believe the GRE does not reflect someone's intelligence, just how well they do on standardized tests. I scored very high myself (168V, 164Q, 5.0 AW) because I am a natural test taker with no test anxiety. I studied for the quant section because my math was rusty but didn't study for the verbal. I think someone who struggles at testing and must work hard to overcome it is more impressive and demonstrates far more diligence, problem-solving, and mental growth than someone like me who is competent but lazy. I will argue, though, that the GRE actually does have a little bit of releva
    1 point
  17. Professors often encourage students to get as high of a GRE score because it can make up for weaknesses in an application. Additionally it is cautioned/advised that a really high quantitative score is required for graduate programs in many STEM disciplines. Many of my professors have expressed that as a strong engineering student, that the GRE quantitative section should be easy and should require ~1 month of preparation. This is a sentiment which is common among many in the STEM disciplines. Unfortunately, this has not been my experienced. I have never had a knack for standardized examin
    1 point
  18. As a former student who attended the program a few years ago, the short answer is "probably not." If you're interested in getting into a PhD program in sociology, an MA degree can allow you to build connections and conduct more research so you can build a stronger academic profile. However, you would be better off going to a program that provides more financial aid, preferably a full ride. The Columbia MA program generally does not offer any financial aid to those admitted. A few students get some financial assistance, but still not nearly enough to cover the cost of tuition+living expens
    1 point
  19. Hey everyone, I recently discovered this website and have found it extremely helpful in answering my grad school inquires but I would like to connect with other students interested in my field of study (because I have yet to find any). I am a currently Art History BA (at top public university) applying to PhD programs in the fall 2017 (to begin in Fall 2018). I am interested in African Diaspora Art History broadly. If you are in a similar field of study or currently in a Art History PhD program, pleaseee comment! I would love to speak with you about the field and talk through some o
    1 point
  20. I have to agree with what CakeTea just said, especially regarding MPPs at SAIS and Georgetown. Both those schools are known for IR- but not MPP programs. And while HKS is listed as a top MPP, be aware that some people feel it is simply a cash cow for those that want to say they went to Harvard but it does not have a great reputation in some circles. The HKS MPA in particular has become this a mechanism for foreign bureaucrats to say they went to Harvard and I heard the qualifications of some people in the program are not nearly as high as you would expect. Apparently Harvard law and busin
    1 point
  21. Thanks for replying everyone. As a first generation college student, I don't have many people to reach out to in terms of academic advice and getting into a PhD program often seems like a distant dream lol. I'm currently interested in applying to these schools with these POI Columbia (Kellie Jones), Northwestern (Krista Thompson), UCLA (Steven Nelson), UT (Cherise Smith), NYU (Deborah Willis), Cornell (Cheryl Finely), Yale (Kobena Mercer), Derek Conrad Murray (UC Santa Cruz) A few questions... when is a good time to reach out to faculty of interest (plan on applying in Fall 2
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  22. I think any program that doesn't offer funding is a money-making program. A lot of people would advise you to not pay for a graduate degree. I don't really like telling someone what they should or shouldn't pay for, but there are a ton of programs out there that won't put you in debt.
    1 point
  23. Start on your SOP EARLY. There is no such thing as "too early." Start writing a rough draft the summer before you apply and research the professors from each of the schools you're applying to so that you can mention it in your SOP. Show interest. Don't do a "blanket" SOP for all your schools. The rough draft will go through a lot of revisions. Have a professor read over it. Do this early so that they can give you feedback without the pressure around peak time (October-December). My SOP went through many revisions before I submitted it. When I was done, it looked nothing like the original I wro
    1 point
  24. I go to Columbia; I'm not in sociology, but I wouldn't recommending doing a one-year master's here. Chances of funding are slim because the free-standing MA programs at Columbia are money-generators for the university. You'll basically end up taking on $60,000 of debt. But if you are planning a PhD in sociology, you can't expect to make much more than that, so you may be in more debt than you can afford. (Also, I'm not sure that Cambridge is a "backup" for Columbia.) Personally, I think the best course of action is to get an MA at a Canadian university. It's likely to be far cheaper for
    1 point
  25. Double spacing just looks to me like someone is trying to make a short, crappy essay look long - brings back memories of middle school homework assignments. I never use double spacing unless I'm printing something out to edit it and plan on writing a lot of notes in pen - I always use 1.5 spacing. I'm sure 1.5 spacing is fine for writing samples, but I wouldn't fiddle with the font size or margins. Generally I think that's a pretty obvious red flag that says "my essay is way too long and I'm trying to prevent you from noticing." It's like when people think double-spacing their bibliographies w
    -1 points


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