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  1. 6 points
    Like the subject: "OISE would like your help!"... OK well I would like OISE's help in relieving my state of uncertainty!!
  2. 6 points
    Fridayz

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    Trying to make sense of analytics hits that are nowhere near the schools you applied to:
  3. 6 points
    sad_diamond

    2019 Applicants

    Any other Duke Literature applicants going bonkers waiting for news about interviews??? I crave the approval of all those marxist zaddies...
  4. 5 points
    telkanuru

    Applications 2019

    This point gets glossed over too often because stupid people take it for elitism: there is a massive difference between someone who attended UKansas and one who attended Princeton, namely that one went to Princeton and the other didn't. Given the frankly insane differences in the resources - monetary, temporal, and otherwise - that each would have at their disposal, the UKansas student would have to be an order of magnitude smarter and more motivated to produce a CV (and a dissertation) equal to the Princeton student's. And of course if they were, why would the be at UKansas and not at least at one of those top-20 programs @psstein mentioned? And if you think that search committees at every level don't think this way, I have a little bridge in Brooklyn I want to sell. A lot of lower-tier PhD programs try to convince nervous prospective students that it's ok - their graduates do really well at other lower-tier schools, schools where those top-20 don't want to be and which would be nervous about taking anyway since they might jump ship fast. That might have been true 30 (or even 10) years ago, but we're in a market where Harvard grads think themselves darned lucky to get a job at Bridgewater State University, and search committees know it. And even if we leave all that aside, what those lower-tier schools are actually saying is that other schools hire their students because their students are perceived as aggressively mediocre (and unlikely to find a job at a better institution). That's their sales pitch. As you approach graduate school, exercise critical self evaluation. If you go, what are you going to do differently to stand out from the crowd at the other end?
  5. 4 points
    placeinspace

    2019 Applicants

    For those of you applying again next cycle, maybe prioritize your programs based on how early they notify so you find out in early January. ? This waiting is the worst part!
  6. 4 points
    School: Guelph Type: CCAP Date of Invite: Jan 22 Type of invite: Either skype or onsite interview Interview date(s): February 1 (or skype interview at another time) POI: PM me
  7. 4 points
    Another day, another empty inbox. Going crazy here.
  8. 4 points
    Matthew3957

    2019 Applicants

    I agree with @rxing963 I woke up to this thread being very down on itself and it's the not the time for that yet imo. For starters, we've had like 5 schools give our acceptances/interviews. More importantly though you have to remember that getting shut out is not the worst thing that will happen to you and if you're coming right out of your BA it might be good. When you've been in an institution your whole life it's sometimes hard to see/live/think outside of it, a couple years can be good for you. As someone who took 6 years in between BA and MA, and applied to History PhDs in year 2 of that break and got shut out, my suggestion is stay positive because your apps are what you had in you this go around and now they're out of your hands. We will find out in the next month probably. If it's good news then all the worrying energy was pointless and coulda been used elsewhere, if it's bad that's not the worst thing either. Also side note on the whole UCSC lit vs HisCon talk: I second that. I applied to lit for this reason and did my undergrad in the department. It's a good place. Berkeley's rhetoric is usually thrown into the same category of programs as MTL and HisCon so that might be worth looking at too. Sorry for typos morning eyes.
  9. 4 points
    kvlt.nihilist

    2019 Applicants

    i think we're all being a bit too harsh on ourselves and a little bleak... i mean, reality IS gonna be pretty cold for a lot of us in terms of fave programs (and some of us may not be accepted anywhere, which is nothing to sweat even then), but decisions haven't been released yet -- that stage is only beginning it might help to live in the moment for the time being? idk, like maybe go bungee jumping lol if you're an adrenaline junkie? i think it's easy to let anxiety get the best of you, especially if you uh have an anxiety disorder (*sweats nervously*) this is my first time in the grad apps process but i honestly think the key is just being stubborn and embracing the life of an artist.... the whole idea of, "i don't care if i have to friggin wait tables for a year, i'm doing this." idk i know i'm an optimist so i may be shedding undue light here. but also just wanted to share i've been reading a punk history book all of today and stubbornness and suffering and just time are exactly how a lot of the bands became big. not saying most will be "big," but just saying, if you're persistent and a little headstrong, you get places lol im just rambling at this point
  10. 4 points
    grad cafe meet up at ryerson!!!!--we need a cool hand sign to throw at each other so we can be spotted DISCRETELY as total nutcases
  11. 3 points
    Can I email admin offices if the result of me being accepted or rejected determines if I adopt another dog? But seriously just reject me already.
  12. 3 points
    Bodys

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    I mean, yes, I am stressed and obviously thinking a lot about admissions (hence me checking this thread everyday...), but I have a lot of peace of mind knowing that whatever happens with admissions, I will still have my art. Gatekeepers to the art industry have faded considerably in the last several years. Additionally, so far in my life I have constantly created, no matter what less-than-desirable circumstances my life has been in. A yes or a no from a program won't really affect that. I say all that, but obviously I really want to work toward an MFA.
  13. 3 points
    justaylor

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    I think we are all going a little crazy right now, and definitely for good reasons, but I want to say I’m super happy with this forum this year. I’m loving how supportive and informative it is. I know we all applied to some of the same schools and we are all cheering for each other and it’s super good to see! I think at this point, let’s lift each other up and share self care techniques and reads and things that could calm us all down. Cause honestly. This isn’t the end of the world! We all have super bright futures and what will be will be! Super thankful for all of you all and knowing I’m not going through it alone!
  14. 3 points
    Bopie5

    2019 Applicants

    Ugh. I'm feeling really discouraged about my prospects. I know I shouldn't give up but that's a bit how I'm feeling right now. And I know that I still haven't even heard back from 6/7 of the places I applied, but it's been a long time since I've wanted anything this bad and I just feel anxious anticipating the feelings of rejection/failure. But what's supposed to happen will happen, and if I have to try again, I'll try again as a stronger applicant!
  15. 3 points
    I am sick of being patient all the time. I have to be patient for hearing back from the universities, I have to be patient in my relationship, I have to patient to see how life unfolds......... At this point, it is driving me nuts. I am just tired of holding back my thoughts for so long and controlling my impulsiveness just to take pride in the fact that I am a mature adult with a lot of patience. I AM STILL A KID AND I NEED A BREAK!!!!!!!!!
  16. 3 points
    dancedementia

    Interview Attire?

    I personally wore business/office dresses to all my interviews because I move and act much more relaxed/natural in it vs. a suit. I know it's frowned upon by some sticklers, but if the program is going to ding me over something this petty, it's probably not a program I want to be in. I much prefer feeling confident about myself to tugging awkwardly on my suit and being visibly uncomfortable.
  17. 2 points
    Hey, folks. I had a major meltdown this morning so my mom sat me down and gave me some insight into the admissions process now that I’ve turned my applications in. She’s a tenured English professor at a large public research university (with only MAs, no PhD program), and has served on an admissions committee a handful of times. She walked me through the review process at her institution and what she’s gathered from peers who also review doctoral applications at other schools. She shied away from giving me too much information before I sent in my apps because she’s way too ethical and has students applying to some of the same schools as me, but now that they’re in she unloaded a bunch of useful information (which, on second thought, might be more helpful for people applying next year than those who’ve already applied). Either way, I thought I’d share this information in case it gives others some insight into this nightmarish process, or at least assuages some of the dread that comes with waiting for decisions. As always, please take this with a mountain of salt, since its only one person’s experience and mostly hearsay since I didn’t take amazing notes when we were chatting (but I did read this post aloud to her and it has her stamp of approval). And of course, apologies if hearing about the process from a professor’s perspective after submitting applications might feel unhelpful/provoke further anxiety. It was comforting to me just to take the mystery out of it, but might not be to others. At her (small-ish) program, there are only 2 professors who read the entirety of the applications each year Admissions or the college of liberal arts have some basic guidelines, and the department administrator separates out the people who don’t meet these requirements before forwarding the applications to the faculty members The adcomm faculty members still review the applications of folks who don’t meet requirements like GPA minimums, however, especially if they have supplemental letters/explanations for poor performance or test scores (mom says she wouldn’t want to miss a ‘diamond in the rough,’ lol, but she’s been listening to a lot of Hamilton lately) The first thing she does when reviewing an application is independently read the SOP and writing sample There are some expectations for both pieces that determine whether or not the applicant is likely to be considered ‘graduate school ready,’ mostly the candidate’s reason for pursuing graduate study and their demonstrated interest in literary study She says a surprising number of people say things like “I want to go to graduate school because I love reading,” which to her doesn’t show that they understand the demands and expectations of grad school, and it comes across to her like they’re unsure of what to do after undergrad so they just want to bide time Even if the SOP and writing sample do not pass this initial litmus test, she and the other faculty member are expected to read the rest of the application, with the exception of applications that are to the wrong school or unreadable or clearly plagiarised etc. She and other faculty reviewers at her institution almost always place more weight on LORs than transcripts and test scores. I asked her to rank the pieces of the application from most to least important and she said the following: SOP, writing sample, LORs, transcript, test scores (pretty common knowledge already, but it was reassuring to hear that the pieces I have the most control over are the most important) The 2 profs then independently make shortlists of applicants they want to accept, with around 10-15 more people than the average cohort size They then discuss with the other reviewer, and most of the time end up with unanimous ‘rankings,’ but sometimes have to get outside readers (i.e. other faculty or trusted admin) to determine who to choose if two candidates are especially close The top however-many of the list are guaranteed funding or a GTA (since their school doesn’t fund all MA students) My mom’s colleagues at both private and public schools who do have PhD programs review applications in a similar way, she believes, and last she heard there are usually double the number of faculty on their adcomms (so, like 4 or more people looking at each application) depending on program size/number of applicants Her institution does not recalculate GPAs, and she says most faculty are (hopefully) human enough to not put too much weight on undergraduate ‘pedigree.’ She says she approaches applicants like she would her own students, i.e. she’s generally on their side, want them to be successful candidates, and gives people the benefit of doubt when it comes to things like grades and test scores if they have adequate explanations However, really poor writing is the only thing that will automatically remove an applicant from serious consideration when she’s on an adcomm, and of course negative LORs or other similar red flags (like mostly C’s and D’s in English courses, or no academic progression/clear patterns in performance) She also doesn’t view older applicants negatively at all, and the only time she will really question an exceptionally large gap between undergraduate and graduate (like, over 12-15 years) is if their writing isn’t demonstrably graduate-level (and even then she said she’ll consider the possibility they might just be out of practice compared to an applicant fresh out of college who probably have more resources/proofreaders at hand) She said that sometimes older applicants demonstrate a lot of maturity and seriousness because they’ve had enough time to consider their career paths— they’re often her most engaged and dedicated students If a candidate is still in undergraduate but shows they clearly understand what grad school is about, this also will not be held against them Diversity of experience counts a lot in her department She always tries to assess how a student might change the culture of the program ‘Fit’ to her is very much about determining who may contribute to the diversity of perspectives upon which the humanities classroom thrives Academic interests are important, especially if what they want to study isn’t offered in the department, but so is admitting students who can learn from one another, and from whom faculty can learn as well. This sounds cheesy, but she said its an important way to foster a well-balanced program The last thing she said to me is that graduate admissions varies immensely from year to year (which, sort of unhelpful but I guess a harsh reality) Usually its a different set of people reviewing each year at her school, and she’s seen her own top students shut out entirely one year and then accepted nearly everywhere the next Many of the most successful scholars she knows have had entirely unrelated careers before going for their doctorates, or they’ve faced the challenge of having to apply twice or even thrice before finding success It really is a crapshoot, but that also means applying again and again won’t reflect poorly on you for most adcomms because it really depends on who else is applying that year (And she also said some sappy mom-stuff about this torturous experience having nothing to do with my worth as a scholar or person, but that’s not coming from her as a professor so maybe not as helpful) If you’ve made it this far, I’m sorry this is so long, but my mom offered to answer any questions if anyone has any I didn’t think to ask. She didn’t know I have been on gradcafe for so long and is worried that I check it too often, but was also excited when I told her I was posting this stuff because she remembers her application days and how horrible it feels not to know. Anyway, thanks for reading, and I hope some of this was helpful to you!
  18. 2 points
    j.alicea

    2019 Acceptances

    @Matthew3957 Thank you! Just got the call today around four from a poi- he said funding info and official acceptance letter would be sent later this week. Good luck, I’m sure you’ll hear something soon.
  19. 2 points
    School: Immaculata UniversityType: Clinical PsyDDate of invite: 01/22/2019Type of invite: Email from dean of graduate studies - not a mass email, I emailed to follow up and she asked which interview date I wanted. She said she will begin emailing everyone starting tomorrow. Yay! Interview dates are 2/25, 2/26, or 2/27.
  20. 2 points
    I got into UC Riverside! I applied as a safety but I genuinely love the research and I'm so thrilled. I'm going to grad school! I feel so much less anxious now about other schools.
  21. 2 points
    Got my first acceptance from the University of Albany! So happy to finally get the first one off the board.
  22. 2 points
    I’m sure it varies by school and POI, but here’s my experience: I had an interview and it was very laid back. POI was very excited about my writing sample and wanted to talk a bit about how I wrote that. They talked generally about the program for a bit, and gave me an opportunity to ask questions. I felt like it was less of an “interview” and more of the POI trying to get a feel for my interest/enthusiasm for the program before making an offer, as well as trying to “sell” the program to me a bit. I was pretty nervous beforehand but it was really easy: we really just talked about things that I was interested in and knew well, so it wasn’t stressful at all. Good luck, and remember that they’re trying to impress you just as much as you want to impress them.
  23. 2 points
    IsLaNdness

    Fall 2019 Applicants

    I think professors are sending out invites individually, so it really depends on who your POI is. Also if you identified multiple POIs in your application, you might get more than one skype interviews. I feel like the professors at umd are just interviewing whoever at whenever they want, so keep an eye on your inbox: it can be any time now
  24. 2 points
    psstein

    Applications 2019

    Younger faculty members, in my experience, are keenly aware of the problems of the job market. With older faculty, it's about 50-50. I've said this before, but faculty at one well-known program I interviewed with explicitly told me "we don't have alt-ac resources," just in not so few words. Most PhD recipients won't have academic jobs, even from the best programs. That being said, you can't telegraph that when you apply. It makes admissions committees question whether you actually have the dedication to do the PhD or whether you actually need a PhD. There are very few people who go into graduate programs wanting to do anything else than become a tenured professor at a research-first institution. There are some, but the vast majority of PhD students don't enter wanting to work for the National Library of Medicine or the FDA's historical office.
  25. 2 points
    Worries: During the interview, they asked me about a time I offended someone with my work and while talking about it I unconsciously did a jerk off hand motion and then when I realized what I was doing I panicked and went “Oh shit, not gonna keep doing that motion” while pushing my hand down with my other hand ?? Excitement: At least I was chosen for an interview and if I do get in even after doing that then that means that I’m so good at what I do that I’m worth accepting an unprofessional liability with no social filter
  26. 2 points
    With attending grad school looking actually possible for the fall, I have now begun freaking out and convincing myself I can't do a PhD program. I was so excited about my interviews, but now I'm simply terrified..
  27. 2 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Applicants

    Lol this is basically my entire personality but + memes because I’m a millennial and that’s how we roll ?
  28. 2 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Applicants

    I'd really encourage you to try again next year if you are shut out. This is my second round, and I can tell you my applications this time are much, much stronger. There is so much to this process, I think the first year should pretty much be viewed as a practice run. If you don't feel strongly about your materials, start revising them now. Just having been through the process has taught you so much, I'm certain. You'll have more tools in your tool kit next time. If it's your dream, I think you owe yourself another try, personally. Good luck!
  29. 2 points
    chartblob

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    For sure. I feel like I'm mostly checking my analytics as something to do while I wait to get real news back! It's certainly not necessarily an indication that a school likes you because they looked at your website (and not a bad thing if you don't get hits from the areas your schools are in), but it's kind of fun to see cities you're looking for pop up.
  30. 2 points
    psstein

    Applications 2019

    Sure, part of it has to do with the increasing hyper-specialization of the field, to the point where the general public has significant issues engaging with any of the major literature. This is basically the case made in The History Manifesto, so I'd encourage you to read it. The general public is largely interested in questions of military history and adjacent fields. The issue, however, is that military history is in some disrepute in the professional field. I'm not a military historian, but there's a poster who is ( @Sigaba, your and Col. Tigh's presence is requested!) and can speak more intelligently as to it. In my program, which is one of the major nexi for military history, the military historians are always looked at somewhat askance. My next point goes to that, which is that the humanities in general do a very poor job selling what they can offer. We live in a world where, to quote Oscar Wilde, man knows the price of everything, but the value of nothing. State legislatures and many people see humanities and liberal arts as "worthless degrees" or "not real degrees" because they don't provide an easily identifiable skill, unlike, for instance, computer science. The humanities provide the ability to critically engage with ideas and, ideally, the ability to express ideas in clear, coherent fashions. Finally, there's just the brutal reality of the job market. If you want a tenured academic job, there are only about 20 (give or take 5) programs that provide a reasonable chance at that, especially if you want a tenured job at a research oriented institution. Far too many students each year graduate from middling programs who have no chance of an academic job. There may be little difference between someone from Kansas and Princeton, but, the Princeton candidate will get the offer 95% of the time. It's a structural issue that there's really no way around, despite Kansas' having an excellent historian of the US West.
  31. 2 points
    I completely agree with all these. Be polite to everyone. Everyone is evaluating you in some way, but also being a nice person is generally a good idea (whether or not you're at an interview). Don't be that guy who was noticeably rude to a waiter. You're going to be living and working in these places, so you should definitely ask about what it's like to live in the area/specific questions about the area. It's great to ask professors during interviews about the city, but you should also ask about what their lab is like. Questions like "Do your students have fellowships?" "Do they go to conferences?" "Where is your funding from?" "What do your students go on to do?" "How many people are in your lab?" show that you know that there's more to being in a lab than just the research. You can love the research but the lab could not offer good opportunities, or not have funding, or is too big/small for your preferences, etc. Of course you can ask grad students the same questions. Definitely take notes. If you have more than one interview, you're going to forget what you did or didn't like at every school by the time you're deciding. I took notes after each faculty meeting about what we talked about and what my impressions were. But taking notes during would be rude (these interviews are supposed to be like a conversation), so take them when there's nothing else going on. Feel free to take notes during powerpoint presentations. I agree to this only to the extent that you should be aware roughly of what they do, but faculty profiles are often out of date. They won't expect you to know everything about their work, or to have read any papers. Only read papers if you're actually really interested. They will likely tell you about their work during the interview (if not, you should ask them about it). Don't refer to any notes during the interviews, but feel free to glance at the one sentence "Dr. X works on XYZ" you should have before you go into the interview.
  32. 1 point
    not sure how helpful this will be since everyone seemed to wear different outfits but i'll share my experience anyway-- I am a female and I wore a blouse, pencil skirt, tights and heels (definitely felt overdressed but I rather be overdressed than under...I also changed at the airport since I was not sure if I would have time in between my flight and the social and I was originally in comfy clothes). Other female candidates were in sweaters, dress pants, dresses and/or cardigans. Male candidates were in button ups and khakis. Grad students were mostly dressed down but professional enough that many of them said they came from practicum, so again females were in dresses and cardigans or dress pants and blouses. A few male students were in jeans but also business casual.
  33. 1 point
    I emailed University of Denver regarding the Clinical Child PhD program and was informed the admissions committee is extending invites this week! Good luck to everyone!
  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
    TheBunny

    Certificates or Specializations?

    Oh, I am sorry. I think it should have an effect on the student's decision to attend universities at the same level. If you are admitted into two T20, equally ranked universities with at least a professor in each to work with, I believe being able to have a specialization opportunity, or a certificate opportunity should be considered. I know that I would consider it for myself. However, if the universities are very different than each other (such as one is T10 but other is T40, or in one of them there is a great professor to work with, but in the other, there is no one to work with), the certificate/specialization should not be a deciding factor.
  36. 1 point
    If anyone applied to Windsor for neuropsych, you should be getting your interview invites soon. My current supervisor just informed me that I have an interview so I'm assuming the committee has made their decisions on who to shortlist.
  37. 1 point
    justaylor

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    Im about through with The 12 Million Dollar Shark- The Curious Economics of Contemporary Art and I have learned SO much from it. It starts to get kind of heavy and difficult throughout the middle when the author is really getting into the economics of auction houses and private sales but its definitely worth the read. I am much more confident talking about the contemporary art market now and I really recommend it to any one going after a Masters.
  38. 1 point
    you will have lots of international peers in the lab -- everyone starts from zero -- take it east mental health tho--- I been meditating
  39. 1 point
    hector549

    LOR Writer Problem

    I think there's no harm in contacting the DGA at the schools that are missing the letter while you're trying to contact the letter-writer. You can perhaps find out when they'll actually be reviewing apps and if your application can still be considered even though the letter is late.
  40. 1 point
    SciGuy720

    2019 Results

    Totally! It wasn't until after I posted that I realized submission dates would've been helpful. I applied prior to 11/30. It's my understanding (based on prior McCourt threads) that this November 30th "deadline" is new for them but it did mean they were announcing some decisions in mid January. I have been trying to piece together reasonable decision timelines based on the respective program threads from prior years so I'll include my application dates below. Chicago-Harris- Applied: Early Action (11/26/18) Decision: 1/7/19 (Phone call from admissions representative, phone calls began on 1/3. Official letter posted to portal 1/9 w/ funding info) Georgetown-McCourt- Applied: 11/29 Decision: 1/15 (Letter w/ funding info on portal. Alerted of portal update via email.) Texas-LBJ- Applied: 12/15 (Round 1) Decision: TBA (Based on prior threads, it seems that R1 decisions are typically released the week of Valentine's Day w/ funding info 2(ish) weeks after) USC-Price- Applied: 12/15 (Scholarship Deadline) Decision: TBA (Based on prior threads, it seems that R1 decisions are typically released the week of Valentine's Day) Duke-Sanford- Applied: 1/5 Decision: TBA HKS- Applied : 12/3 Decision: Early March (according to HKS website) Best of luck to everyone as decisions start to come in!
  41. 1 point
    She's a home organizer and author. She has a netflix show which many people have been watching lately! She also has short, informative videos on youtube.
  42. 1 point
    round2_

    Fall 2019 Psychology PhD Applicants!

    Ha I actually am an RA already. It's frustrating because I already had a ton of experience as an undergrad, but only got 1 interview (at a top program) so I did another 1.5 years full time. I have publications, I have posters. I've beyond shown I can do the work. I just need someone to give me a shot -- but it's way easier to hire an engineer who took a few psych classes for fun or someone who has a huge list of prestigious awards/opportunities or the right connections.
  43. 1 point
    Agreed it's all about selling yourself. I've got excellent stats and I didn't get in the first couple times.... probably because I'm not really good at selling myself and I tend to be a little too uncertain and humble in my essays. Other undergrad friends of mine had more 'average' stats and got in on the first try. At the end of the day stats are boring numbers that don't tell the committee anything real about you. The only way to actually stand out from the crowd is building a compelling narrative about yourself. You've got so much going for you that I don't think you should have a hard time with that! Rely on what isn't average about you, and the proven history of success that you clearly have. You got this.
  44. 1 point
    PokePsych

    Interview Attire?

    Decided to go with the suit pants & white shirt and nice cardigan because of the two blazers I have here, one blazer screams 80s and the other one pajama fashion :') And my nice on is halfway across the world..
  45. 1 point
    The_Last_Thylacine

    Acceptances

    I've been accepted to UCSB! I'm ecstatic to have the opportunity to continue studying philosophy.
  46. 1 point
    I am also from a really small school and am interviewing at big places! There should be some sort of student representative that will guide you to where you're supposed to go... I highly doubt they expect you to get everywhere with no help. They will probably give you an itinerary and there will likely be lots of people listed on it who can help you or even walk with you to each stop!
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    I can't seem to find it, but a few years ago somebody got rejected from an ivy and under the comments said (paraphrasing), "And we can assure you, that not only are the people we did accept more intelligent, but also better looking"
  49. 1 point
    Colorado State: "Apparently you don't even have to apply in order to be rejected from certain schools. What a cluster F it must be over there that they're emailing people who have simply requested information that they're 'rejected'."
  50. 1 point
    I read one the other day that simply read: "Wow!" My favorites are more of a type and not any one in particular. They fall under two categories: "I have the highest GPA and GRE scores of anyone in the history of the World. I published in every single research journal on the planet. I won ten Nobel Prizes last year...I was so positive I was going to be accepted that I moved to [location of school] before I even submitted my application. Graduate school admissions officers are a bunch of imbeciles who are too ignorant to exist". A bit of an exaggeration, sure, but these types of "quotes" are there. And, "No biggie. I knew I was not going to get accepted".


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