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  1. 11 points
    Idk about you guys, but once all the results are in it's going to be weird not spending every second of my human existence checking my email, gradcafe, reddit, and grad portals. I'll have to get a life... I kind of forget what life was like before this.
  2. 10 points
    Kandykane

    Get off grad cafe!!!

    Get off of here guys. Stop stressing yourselves!! Apps are in just enjoy the wait!!! Go out and party while you wait haha
  3. 9 points
    Anonymouse124

    2019 Applicants

    I desperately want to hear back from my last few schools so I can start making decisions already. I feel like there's just a huge number of impending life choices waiting to crash down on my shoulders. Anxiety does not sleep and, apparently, neither do I. Hope everyone's doing okay and managing the stress! We'll get through this one way or another. Fingers and toes crossed for each and every one of you!
  4. 9 points
    Psyhopeful

    psychology survey

    No one here knows what it’s like to be a psychologist. We’re all trying to get into grad school so that we can get a degree in psychology and become one.
  5. 8 points
    swarthmawr

    2019 Applicants

    Does anyone know how to sleep through the night anymore... asking for a friend
  6. 7 points
    @Clinicalh0peful I am in a similar boat. Although I haven't been in this particular situation before, I've been through salary negotiations for jobs several times over the years and I think it's a similar situation as we are working as TAs/RAs for these funds. I'd recommend emailing your preferred program / POI stating that you are excited about the offer and feel a strong fit with the program and POI, but that you have received another offer with higher funding that would have a significant impact on your finances over the course of your studies. Be as specific as you were here ("$8,000 per year = $~50K over six years). Ask if there is any flexibility on their end to increase their offer. Do not offer to work more - let them propose options first. They may offer bursaries or scholarships instead of TA/RA'ing more. Feel free to ask about PhD funding if the other program has guaranteed a PhD funding package - if they haven't either, it's not a bargaining chip you can use. Overall, the tone of the email should be polite, professional, and concise. A few things to consider once funding details are finalized (time to break out the spreadsheet!): Cost of living in City A versus City B - rent, transit, food, etc. Tuition costs in Program A versus Program B. Also, do the programs charge tuition on the internship year? Some do, some don't - could be a difference of $5-8K overall. Difference between guaranteed funding versus likely funding - speak with grad students about this. E.g., program may only guarantee 15K but students end up with $25K in practice. To a lesser extent - likelihood of receiving CGS/OGS or other funding in each program. This is often POI-specific, so ask their grad students if they've been successful in the past. I'd only pay attention to big differences - e.g., one POI's students say they never or rarely get external funding, the other POI's students receive it all the time. If it's still quite a difference, then it's up to you to decide what will be best for you long term. If it's more of a slight preference for the lower-paying program, then perhaps you might be better off taking the higher-funded offer. However, if you think you'd be unhappy or really regret taking the higher-funded one, then go with your preferred school. Hope this is helpful! **Edit: one more note - if you're using OSAP, make sure to check if there are differences in your loan/bursary amounts between the schools. OSAP funding is specific to regions/schools I believe.
  7. 7 points
    beardedlady

    2019 Applicants

    Just dropping in to share this, in case anyone could use a pick-me-up via humorous, eccentric, and historical feline portraiture. Eulalie Osgood Grover, writer of children's books and the original cat memer (c. 1911): (enjoy further perusal: https://archive.org/details/kittenscatsbooko00grov)
  8. 7 points
    Karisjns

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    Just received my second acceptance! Accepted into the Contemporary Art Practice MFA program at Portland State via email. Hope the good fortune falls upon you all this week as well!
  9. 6 points
    illcounsel

    2019 Applicants

    Anyone else just waiting around for schools to get back to them so they can get on with making a decision? So looking forward to being out of this limbo and planning the future. At least I had a snow day from work today and could take Ursula on a nice hike:
  10. 6 points
    Anniemsw

    Canada MSW 2019

    My acorn says invited !!!! HOLY SHIT! Sorry for the swearing. If you know my gpa from school I had a small chance of getting in. So if it's possible for me it's possible for you. Much love
  11. 6 points
    MSW-101

    Canada MSW 2019

    My ACORN changed to "Invited" for Uoft.......I got innnnnnnnnnnnn
  12. 6 points
    OHSP

    Applications 2019

    ...plenty of people successfully admitted to PhD programs in the past few years are not working on the "popular themes" that you've listed. I'd really get yourself away from thinking that people are getting in over you because their work is "trendy". Often it's less a matter of "topic" (I don't know of anyone who talks about the topic they're working on, really), and more a matter of research questions -- how are you presenting the questions that are guiding your research? Do the questions sound urgent, relevant, feasible, worth pursuing etc, and do they show that you're thinking about how to intervene in historiographical debates, methods etc etc. Instead of blaming the "trends" you're identifying, think about how you can re-frame your project (beyond the transnational thing) by explaining where it fits and who you're speaking to. On the same note, the SoP is very, very important--more important than having publications or a completed thesis or some random fellowship that your POI's never heard of etc. I'd go so far as to say that without a strong SoP you can't guarantee that admissions committees are going to do more than skim the rest of your application (at two schools I was admitted to it was obvious that my POIs had not read my writing sample, beyond maybe the first page--this is just a practical reality. They have very little time, they're not actually reading every 25 page paper closely). So the SoP is where you frame your project and "stand out" from the hundreds of other applicants. I used to think the advice on this forum was harshly phrased--it's kind of necessarily so. Without tough advice you won't make the serious changes required to get into a program, so my advice is to find a professor (assistant profs are often closer to the process/remember their own SoP) who can give you that brutal advice in real life--it was the most helpful thing I did when applying.
  13. 6 points
    To echo what MtnDuck said: the effect cascades. By your decision impacts hundreds of people indirectly, and at least one person directly. Your decline opens up a spot which enables someone to decline their lesser offers. If most shifting happens in April, there just isn't enough time for adcoms to go down the waitlist. If there is on average 3 day per offer turnaround, the adcomms can't get through 10 people on their waitlist in 3 days -- when the declines really happen. Objections: But they are willing to fly me out! This is a great opportunity to visit schools and network with professors I am interested in. This is really an unfair tease. If you know you aren't taking their offer, then you're going on false pretenses, wasting their department's money, and making people wait for minimal gains. Is it really a good idea to use people to sight-see? It isn't like you're going to get a letter of recommendation. Just add them on PhilPeople for pete's sake. But if I decline that doesn't impact you. So what? For some people, if they were given an offer before the 15th, they would accept your school's offer. You are literally impacting someone's ability to get into a school or get into a better school. It doesn't have to be about impacting anyone you know. The sooner the impact, the sooner others can impact others down stream. I am under no obligation to make any decision before April 15. If I wait, that's my prerogative. True. Nothing is forcing you to make a decision, and definitely not to rush you. But if nothing will change your mind about the decision, then why take the time? If you are still unsure, that's one thing, but if you already have an obviously better offer, then this shows a character defect when you know this impacts other people's futures. Comparative harm account: you're harming people. You have a right to harm people, but that doesn't mean harming is right. Whatever my choice and whenever I decide to notify them, such course of action would be statistically normal. You cannot expect me to act otherwise. Okay, I won't argue that it is obligatory, but clearly you don't see supererogatory actions as worthy of aspiration. I hope you're not working in ethics. It seems like it could be in my interest to hold onto the offer. I can use it as leverage. Sure, if you think they are really comparable. But I'd argue it might even be in your interest to decline. The school might come back with a counter-offer that would not have been available if you didn't give them ample time to put together a more lucrative package.
  14. 5 points
    Ais

    MFA 2019 Freak Out Forum

    Over the moon to be offered a place at Tyler painting, it seemed such a long shot! Are any others for Tyler on here? Email said the dean has a fund for incoming MFA students to visit regardless of distance, but I may be taking the biscuit being from Ireland 😂😂😂
  15. 5 points
    The Wordsworthian

    2019 Applicants

    I just called UVA to ask if they had sent out all acceptance and waitlist notifications and they did. Wish some of these schools would be more proactive about rejection notifications rather than stringing us along, especially considering how much $ it costs to apply.
  16. 5 points
    OHSP

    Applications 2019

    It literally could just be that you haven't been notified. Not trying to false hope anyone but it's really not over until it's officially over.
  17. 5 points
    N_D

    Canada MSW 2019

    Nothing for me yet either. Trying to gently remind myself that my self-worth isn’t reliant on how these institutions perceive me. Hope y’all are able to carry some gentleness with yourselves as well 💞
  18. 5 points
    I would just email the director of admissions directly and tell them that you have a different offer that you will definitely accept. (There is probably a way to do this online in some of the systems, but I would say even if you do that still email the director of admissions, since they might not notice that you've done it in the system, etc.--at least in our system we still have access to withdrawn applications and they look just like regular ones.) In addition to the reasons given above, this helps admissions committees A LOT! If you withdraw your application, then we can offer the spot we might have offered to you directly to the person who would be first on the waitlist, instead of waitlisting them. (Or, if we were on the fence about you, we can stop worrying about you altogether and just move on.)
  19. 4 points
    I told my work husband I am no longer allowed on grad cafe because it makes me crazy! He caught me on there this morning and threw highlighters at me (she says while checking site in ladies room).
  20. 4 points
    lol right? I have two monitors in my office and one of them is devoted to grad school stuff. And I don't use the other. Are you seeing the picture I just drew?
  21. 4 points
    Yeah, now I'm like what am I supposed to do all day at work?
  22. 4 points
    They're all amazing schools, so bring your decision down to research fit and location. If you want to do Bayesian stuff, obviously go to Duke. If you're interested in ML, UW has some great ML people (Emily Fox and Witten) as does Berkeley (Jordan). I'd visit and follow your gut. You can't go wrong. If you are choosing between programs that are current ranked 12 and above on US News (Stanford, Berkeley, Washington, Harvard, Chicago, Duke, CMU, Michigan, UPenn), I don't think there is a one size fits all answer.
  23. 4 points
    Thank you, lurkingfaculty and Kantattheairport. I just withdrew from Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Notre Dame, Pitt, and UT-Austin. I couldn't always find a DGS/DGA, but I tried to find the most relevant email(s), and I'm sure folks there will be able to forward them to the right place.
  24. 4 points
    IceCream & MatSci

    The Positivity Thread

    I got accepted into my top choice!!!!!!!! With a fellowship!!!!!!
  25. 4 points
    jillcicle

    2019 Acceptances

    I'm in at UNC Chapel Hill as well! (Medievalist.) Email from DGS with attached PDF containing acceptance and info. Also, yes, the timing was weird - email arrived at 11:32 pm PST yesterday? So I'm still too asleep to react except blind relief because I had become certain I was shut out this year. Hold onto hope, my friends!
  26. 4 points
    Englishtea1

    2019 Acceptances

    In at UNC Chapel Hill! Received a nice, very personalized email from the DGS. Look out for those acceptances if you applied!
  27. 4 points
    I will turn down NIU, and withdraw from U Mass, Indiana, and Cornell. I hope it helps someone!
  28. 4 points
    emprof

    2019 Applicants

    School prestige is not not a factor. (Litotes!) But I wouldn't say that it's decisive. I think @Dares has a point in saying that there is a particular language (and habits of mind, and methodologies, and preoccuping questions, etc.) that characterizes elite academic discourse. It's the language that the profession uses to talk to itself. And one might more readily, or more easily, encounter that language (habit of mind, methodology, etc.) at Yale than at Unknown University. So perhaps a candidate from Yale will be more immediately legible to an admissions committee as a proto-academic than the UU candidate. There is also the sense--perhaps unfair--that success at a prestigious university presages success anywhere; if an undergraduate institution is truly unknown to the committee, then a straight-A average there might not provoke that same assumption. (The UU could be academically rigorous, of course--but it could not be.) LORs often rate students in comparison to other students: e.g., "top 5%," "top 10%," "2 or 3 best of my career." At a prestigious university, top 2-3 of the career is very impressive. At UU, it might be less so. It's not that the committee knows or assumes the UU student to be weaker than the Yale student; it's just that the information from UU doesn't signify as strongly. That said, committees also love to flatter themselves (and sometimes maybe they're right) that they can recognize "diamonds in the rough" (this is a phrase that comes up all of the time) and "refine" them with expert teaching, mentorship, and advising. There's also a high premium on diversity, including economic diversity and "first-generation college student" status--meaning we don't want a whole class of Ivy League grads from wealthy parents with graduate degrees. If an applicant has gone to a fancy prep school and a fancy university, and is very polished, but the ideas in the WS are uninteresting, that application is much less compelling than one from an applicant from UU who lacks polish and knowledge of the most recent work in the field, but offers a strikingly original approach to a text or topic. And occasionally, applicants from high-prestige undergraduate institutions are identified so strongly with their prestigious undergraduate mentors that the question of "teachability" comes up: does the applicant seem already to be calcified in a particular approach or methodology and s/he would not be adequately responsive to feedback and mentorship? So all of that is to say: sure, it matters. Everything in the application matters. But it matters a lot less than the intellectual excitement that the SoP and WS generate. Hope this is helpful. Happy to natter on further if people have questions.
  29. 4 points
    I can't upvote this enough. My life for the past year and counting.
  30. 4 points
  31. 3 points
    Hi, everyone. Does anybody have any information to compare these schools? I am very excited to have been accepted to these amazing schools and never expected I would have to make such a decision. Berkeley has been my top choice for a while for various reasons. But I want to be cautious and evaluate all my options carefully. I will definitely be visiting Duke and Berkeley to help decide, but I'm not sure if I want to attend UW. Any information about these schools (especially UW, since I'm less familiar with their program) would be helpful for me.
  32. 3 points
    bfat

    Current English PhD students - Q&A

    Hey there! These are great questions, and ones whose answers would probably differ depending on who you ask. I would say that you definitely want to present at at least one conference by the end of your second year, and aim to work up a seminar paper for publication after that second year as well. Many of the regional MLA conferences (and ACLA) have abstract deadlines at the end of September. By that point, you should have a sense of what your seminar papers will look like--let your work do double duty, and propose one of your seminar paper topics for a conference. Get that first conference out of the way, because it's probably going to suck, and regional conferences are great for grad students figuring things out. If you can present once in each year early on, that's great. By years 3 and 4, you should probably have worked up an article and sent it around, hopefully to have it published. You can also do one or two (no more!) book reviews or notes. These don't count for much, but they're good to see on a CV, as long as there are other things on there. In your last 2 years, you should have found your "niche" conferences. For me, that's SLSA (Society for Literature, Science and the Arts), and a few other genre-specific conferences. You should also try to chair/organize at least one panel at one of these conferences. Ideally, you should have at least one in-print publication (not under review or forthcoming) by the time you're done, although some wacky overachievers will have 3-4. We hate those people. I went to MLA for the first time this year, and I'd say save that for the year you're on the job market. It's huge, expensive, and kind of depressing. You'll make much better connections at the small conferences where you can actually meet and chat with your academic heroes 😍 Just don't do what I did and squeeze 6 research presentations/conferences into 4 months while also trying to finish your dissertation and go on the job market. It's not smart, kids. Don't do it.
  33. 3 points
    bfat

    Current English PhD students - Q&A

    Hey there. Good questions. 1. If you are at a campus visit, the school is trying to woo you. They are probably not going to answer the "hard" (but important) questions that will actually be helpful, like "Is this department toxic?" or "Will I receive the full support I need here?" Grad students may be more open about this kind of thing than professors, so I would just try to talk to as many grad students as you can during your visit who work in similar areas to you, and try to get a sense of both the opportunities and challenges that those students have faced. Ask where they are now in the program, what's been the hardest thing for them so far, and what kind of supports they've had to manage those difficulties. 2. In preparing for your first year, I would suggest, more than anything: read stuff that you like! It will be a while before you have a chance to do this again, and reading widely in the genre or period that you really love will actually help you later down the line. Start a book journal. Write 1 or 2 pages of quick notes on each thing you read. Think about questions like, "How could I write about this?" and "How could I teach this?" When it comes time to actually develop a project, or even develop a syllabus, you're going to want to go back to those things you love and find exciting. Also, get an ipod. A little one (the nano? not the tiniest one, but the small one with the screen). Download audiobooks of works you want to read but don't think you have time for, and put them on there. Listen as you walk the dog, do laundry, drive, etc. They will save your life and keep you sane. Audible, LibraVox, and AudioBookBay. They're your friends. (Ask me how I survived a course on the Victorian novel while teaching, doing an RA-ship, and raising a 3 year old, lol.) 3. There's really not much I would have done differently. My general advice to new admits is: trust hesitatingly until you get a sense of the department dynamic; know your limits as a human and respect them; stay curious; stick with the people who make you feel good about what you do, but listen to criticism and try to understand where it's coming from. Academia is weird. It's full of personal politics that manifest institutionally, and institutional politics that manifest personally. It takes a while to figure out the lay of the land. I hope this was helpful, and not too jaded. 😂
  34. 3 points
    If I were you I would accept SMU. Fully funded is (for me) a huge priority. I would not go to a program that wasn't fully funded.
  35. 3 points
    Hi all! I hope everyone is well during this super busy and stressful time. I was hoping to get a little insight from this wonderful group. This is my second time applying to clinical psych programs and things are not looking particularly good in terms of receiving an acceptance for Fall 2019. Last year I received a waitlist offer and this year I had two interviews. I graduated this past June (e.g., class of 2018) and I feel this enormous pressure to start grad school as soon as possible, and oftentimes feel like I am "behind" in some way, especially in light of some recent rejections. Is there anyone here that took several years off/applied several times to get into clinical? Overall, I am feeling incredibly defeated and hopeless at the moment. Feel free to PM me if that is more comfortable for you. Thanks in advance everyone!
  36. 3 points
    Chantalilly

    Canada MSW 2019

    Thanks for this reminder.. we all need to hear it right now. I think it is difficult because this job comes from the heart... but yep it is a highly competitive program. Warm Wishes to all of you.
  37. 3 points
    Chantalilly

    Canada MSW 2019

    The more of us who haven't heard the better the sign right? Maybe because of the glitches it is taking longer to put acceptances out xx
  38. 3 points
    UW is particularly strong for social science statistics and analysis of network/spatial data. It also has a few outstanding researchers in the machine learning (both theoretical foundations and methodology/applications).
  39. 3 points
    Aithera

    Applications 2019

    @Jericho Thanks! I guess it was fortuitous that I posted this morning, because I just got my acceptance
  40. 3 points
    I also want to point towards Sunaura Taylor's Beasts of Burden: Animal and Disability Liberation. It's great. The Deleuze & Guattari full chapter name is "Becoming-Intense, Becoming-Animal, becoming-Imperceptible" & is indeed from A Thousand Plateaus! & if you like them, @NoNameGuy, you might like Brian Massumi's What Animals Teach Us About Politics which is really Deleuzian. I think having studied philosophy is a huge asset for you! There's a lot of synergy between the two fields -- While in an "English" program, my focus is on philosophy or "theory" more often than not. OH, and Alexis Shotwell's Against Purity has a few chapters on animals, and talks about veganism in a way I find compelling!
  41. 3 points
    KA2019

    Canada MSW 2019

    Hello everyone, I applied for the advanced standing MSW program at U of T. I just looked at ACORN and it has changed to invited! Hopefully you all get good news today!
  42. 3 points
    apex45

    PHD Applicants: Fall 2019

    I think the rankings are pretty meaningless tbh. In addition to what @Epidemiology19 said, they're based only on faculty's perceptions of schools they don't work at. They don't take into account graduation rates, placement, strength of the curriculum, student factors, etc. I picked where to apply based on research fit and mentorship quality, which I think are ultimately the biggest factors in a PhD student's success. I have no idea what program I'll pick yet, but ranking won't factor into my decision at all.
  43. 3 points
    Congrats on getting accepted! I would say something like Dear XXXX, I really enjoyed interviewing at your program, I was especially impressed by/ enjoyed XYZ. It was great to have the opportunity to meet the faculty and students. However, I am writing to inform you that I have accepted an offer elsewhere, so I would like to withdraw my application from X. Please let me know if there is anything else you need from me at this point. I appreciate your time and consideration. Thank you, XX Or something along those lines. I feel like you always want to be thoughtful in how you respond as you never know who your future colleagues will be, and your reputation is important. Congrats again!!
  44. 3 points
    Epidemiology19

    PHD Applicants: Fall 2019

    I’d be curious to hear what other people think, but my personal opinion is that it doesn’t mean much on an individual level. Part of the reason is that we apply to specific departments within schools, and there isn’t a ranking for that. Additionally, as we all know, it’s very much about research fit for PhD programs. However, with that said, I think it can give a broad overall sense of how the program is perceived to others, and probably the types of resources that the school has In my case, I will likely turn down a highly ranked program (according to USN&WR) for a lower ranked one because of research and faculty fit.
  45. 3 points
    I am currently in waitlist world and just dreaming about the day I get to (hopefully) post my acceptance in this thread....... congrats to everyone getting accepted!!!
  46. 3 points
    tacocat211

    2019 Applicants

    i feel like i’ve learned so much since submitting my applications (two of my classes this semester are HEAVY rhetorical/digital rhetoric theory). i wish i could convey that to the adcomms, like hey, i’m actually a little bit better now than when i submitted my apps PLS ACCEPT ME
  47. 3 points
    emprof

    2019 Applicants

    Yes! And perhaps even more importantly: if you know you *don't* want to come (i.e., you've been admitted to a school higher on your list), it's so helpful to know that ahead of time! Sometimes, knowing in advance of the April 15 deadline is what allows us to admit someone from the waitlist. So please don't postpone replying "no" once you know.
  48. 3 points
    transrelativity

    2019 Applications Thread

    I have a Temple funding update! I received the official offer by email this afternoon. It's a Presidential Fellowship with four years of funding, two with service requirements and two without, and a $32k stipend. I'm so happy and grateful! Wishing everyone great offers at their top choices!
  49. 3 points
    I would also like to add-- if you know you're not going to attend an institution, please don't wait until April 15th to tell the department that you are going elsewhere. This also goes for waitlists--if you can take yourself off of them the department can go to the next person if a spot opens up and not wait to hear back from you first! I know this may seem (very) obvious, but I've had a few previous colleagues wait until the 15th deadline to tell all/most of the schools they would be going elsewhere including the ones that they had already ruled out as live possibilities. Sometimes folks will have very little time when they receive a last minute offer to decide on whether or not to say yes or no and to figure out how it compares to any other offers they already have. The earlier the waitlists get moving, the better off everyone is (and sometimes previously rejected folks can receive an offer--e.g. UVA last year).
  50. 3 points
    urbanfarmer

    Current English PhD students - Q&A

    As a current student, and someone who has a lot of friends in many different kinds/feels of programs, let me try to answer as best as I can, re: what to think about when visiting: You MIGHT click immediately with the campus/faculty/students. Or you might not. Neither one is (necessarily) an indicator of anything. You might not click immediately because you're nervous, or the students you'll get along with best weren't around when you were visiting, or because some people take a while to get to know. Or you may click, and then it turns out that that faculty member is actually fairly hands-off when it comes to advising, or that student goes on leave, or the one conversation you had turns out not to be indicative of any further connection. I have a friend who is super close with their cohort and faculty members. I have a friend who gets along with some of the people in their program, but not all of them, and isn't close with any of them. They're both very happy in their situations. I'm somewhere in the middle, and also happy. Remember, this is a professional situation: as long as you feel like you can get along with people, and won't mind shooting the shit for a few minutes before talks/class/etc... that's the main thing! The friend who isn't close with anyone in her program has a huge friend circle totally outside of the school, and thinks of being in her program as going to work (note: this is, of course, easier to do in a big city. If you're in a small college town, maybe care much more about potential friends). While I know not all of you are coming right out of undergrad, if you are, remember that grad school isn't necessarily an all-encompassing social situation like college is. A few things I'd recommend thinking about, during visits: 1. Do you think the conditions here will allow you to work as best as you can? Will the stipend REALLY work, or might you have to get some loans/work an evening job? Does there seem to be a lot of structure? Is there a grad student union? What's expected of you over summers? Ask current students about one thing that they wish they could change about the program. 2. Rates of burnout and depression are really, really high among grad students. Maybe you're the sort of person who likes to put your head down and do nothing but work... but if not, what other resources are available to you, to help you avoid that? CAN you find friends outside of the university if you want to? Is going to live music important? Do you like being able to go hiking? Are you really into, say, yoga-- and is there a yoga studio around that you think you'd like? Don't forget that you have to be a person, too! 3. What's the insurance like? Do you have any specialized medical issues that might be affected? For instance, I know two students in my program who had to switch off of the school insurance plan because medications they needed weren't covered/weren't covered well enough. 4. Think about not just "can I survive?" on the stipend, but what it will get you. What I mean by that is: will you have to live with roommates? Are you REALLY ok with not living by yourself for the next six years? Will you have money to go out to eat every now and then? Do you like flying to see your family often? Yes-- you're probably going to have to live tightly and compromise no matter what, but genuinely examine what things in your life that cost money add significantly to your happiness, and decide if they can stay there on the stipend you're being offered. 5. If you're a woman (and this probably applies to PoC and queer folk, too!), ask other female (PoC/queer/etc) students about their experiences there. Is there some institutional sexism? Are there other students (or faculty) that they complain about? Anyways, just a few things to consider! Good luck to all of you in visits!


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