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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/08/2019 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Just received an offer off the waitlist from Johns Hopkins! Time for the difficult deliberations that some part of me wished would never be necessary. Still, not complaining; I feel unbelievably fortunate to have this choice that needs making.
  2. 8 points
    anyone else feeling at least a little nauseous at all times as we enter the last week of waiting here? if not, that’s cool, I’m nauseous enough for all of us! it’s gonna be a loooong week (for the UVA waitlist crew: I heard movement is expected “early” this week, fwiw)
  3. 8 points
    dilby

    2019 Decisions Thread

    I couldn't have put it better myself. I just accepted my offer at Yale — see you in New Haven?
  4. 5 points
    hopingforahailmary

    PHD Applicants: Fall 2019

    After 3 applications cycles, 14 applications, and 12 rejections, I am FINALLY going to my dream program! I got a call from JHU GDEC Friday afternoon and I received my acceptance letter/saw portal changes a few hours later. DREAMS COME TRUE LADIES AND GENTS YOU CAN MAKE IT OFF THE WAITLIST! Seriously though, thank you to this forum for all of the support and well wishes. Congrats to all!!!
  5. 5 points
    cullenish

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    This just means NSF took away the awards of everyone last year too just to spite them.
  6. 4 points
    @VentralStream You can infer that--but yeah, you're right.
  7. 4 points
    cullenish

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    AHHHHHHHHHHH This gonna be such a weight off my shoulders. I have a research presentation tomorrow though so I'm going to be a little distracted regardless of the results lol
  8. 4 points
    laura120

    Chapman University

    @speechieontherun the way you commented on posts is not supportive of other students. If you don’t mind me asking, have you received admission to a graduate program this fall? Because whether you have or have not, this is not an environment of disencouragement.
  9. 4 points
    I second Sigaba's comment. I know of a couple of star scholars who can place students well but are borderline emotionally abusive in different ways and make their advisees' grad school experience a living hell. It's important to know if that's the situation you're walking into so you can make an informed decision about the environment you'll be in for the next several years of your life. That's one thing you need to know. The other is, as others have said, your potential advisor's placement record. I would include their dropout record here as well and ask for the reasons their former students who didn't graduate left the program. Often that happens because the student didn't feel grad school was for them, which is fine, but sometimes the advisor or department could play a role in pushing someone out of academia. You want to know if your advisor has a track record of turning administrative formalities like renewal forms or evaluations that no one else in the department takes seriously into massive trials, if they refuse to let students defend for years on end, if they frequently clash with students over conceptual questions pertaining to their dissertations, if they are inaccessible or indifferent, if they are liable to forget who you are in between meetings, if they have ever messed up handling a student's medical/mental health/pregnancy/parenthood/family/academic issues, etc. Frankly, it sounds like School B is a better fit, has more money for you and would make you happier, plus the warning that having a second advisor would be a good idea is a massive red flag re. School A. So I will give you different advice from some others and tell you that it's reasonable to lean toward School B at this point. If you were choosing between a mediocre advisor at a top-10 department and a great advisor at a top-30 department, assuming they were ranked by placement and not just by the USNWR's weird criteria, the latter would be harder to justify because of the massive placement advantage the former would be likely to have. But, frankly, both of your choices probably have a hard time competing for plum jobs/postdocs with top departments, so the difference in ranking is less significant. Again, as everyone else has said, do look at your advisors' placement record first, in particular in recent years.
  10. 3 points
    SLPˈhjumənz

    2019 Canadian SLP Thread

    Anyone from out of province accepted to UBC? I know it can be scary moving to a new place, especially one with a reputation of being so $$$. If you need any advice on the city, feel free to DM me! For those of you waitlisted or denied, try to stay positive. I wasn’t accepted last year to UBC and I was shattered (especially during exam period, it friggen SUCKS!!!). If I can offer you any advice, try to pick yourself up, work super hard and just focus on gaining more experience working with SLPs, which will only be more helpful once you are in the field. Reach out to as many professors or professionals in the field as you can. The year off in between applications turned out to be my most productive and informative year and now I feel more prepared as I enter an SLP masters. Do NOT give up! Follow your passion, be kind to yourself and keep working hard!!! PS. Congrats to all of those who were accepted this year!
  11. 3 points
    As we're all anxiously waiting to find out about orientation, I found this that might be helpful! http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/onestop/repository/files/registrar/2019-calendars/FALL 2019 REGISTRATION INFO.pdf
  12. 3 points
    smalltownwater

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    I was doing pretty okay, but stalking this thread recently is increasing my own anxiety. 😂
  13. 3 points
    laura120

    Chapman University

    @speechieontherun I’m not asking that you sugarcoat it. I’m asking that you don’t comment at all if you are unable to support other students. There is a difference between being realistic and being cruel. Please get off grad cafe.
  14. 3 points
    FiguresIII

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Yale Comp Lit!
  15. 3 points
    PokePsych

    Venting Thread- Vent about anything.

    Hate the US and their weird ass tax system and determination of residency (with the only other country in the world basing 'residency' based on nationality being eritrea). Like for real.. why you folks always have to be special with your weird non-metric system, weird president, and also these things..
  16. 2 points
    P16

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    Good luck to everyone!
  17. 2 points
    cullenish

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    scchurt, imma need you to take that negative energy and make it positive by repressing any recognition of reality
  18. 2 points
    md@

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
  19. 2 points
    Rc2121

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    11 PM west coast time I imagine..... There goes any potential sleep I was going to get tonight. Tears of joy or sadness are guaranteed
  20. 2 points
    parisetsenegal

    2019-2020 Boren Applicants

    Welp, there goes doing anything productive on Thursday or Friday...
  21. 2 points
    Like many others in this thread, I have applied 3 times. I was completely unprepared the first time; I got 4 interviews the 2nd time, but was rejected from all; and I have been accepted this 3rd time, and to my top choice of programs. I've also learned a lot from this process, some of which I think is worth sharing: Stop focusing on everyone else around you. I made the mistake of always comparing myself to both other applicants and students, and I always felt a sense of inadequacy. Even at the interviews, I always felt like I was the weakest candidate there and had no chance. Even during this current cycle, those thought persisted. For example: the program that accepted me interviewed 8-10 applicants per PI, so there were a LOT of people there. I thought for sure, I had no chance. Well folks - I got in! That goes to show that you have just as much a chance as anyone else at that interview. And, in general, you have no idea how well someone is going to mesh with a PI or program, so don't compare yourself to someone who you feel is superior. Take your time. If you feel any sense of uncertainty, I would recommend taking a year or two off and working in a research setting. I was rejected after applying straight out of undergrad, and again the next year. I actually did not apply last cycle, due to a job commitment. However, I am very thankful for the experience I was able to gain in these 3 years I will have as a research assistant. I feel much more prepared for graduate school, and that definitely came across on my interviews. I have absolutely no doubt that this is what I want to do. Prepare, but don't memorize. It is very important to practice answering some questions that may be thrown at you, to avoid looking like a "deer in headlights" during the actual interview. Topics like your research interests, potential study ideas, your past research experience (things you learned), and "why their program" are all pretty standard, and they expect you to be able to answer them with ease. However, you don't want it to come across like you've memorized a canned answer. The more natural your conversation flows, the more comfortable you feel, and the better rapport you have. Just be yourself - you know your stuff! Don't give up! If this wasn't your time, it wasn't your time. Don't give up just yet. Of course, there may come a point where you at least consider another option, but give it a little time first. This process is grueling and competitive, and honestly, timing and luck definitely play a part, as well. You may be the most qualified candidate out there, but there was just someone else who meshed better with your POI. It was just the wrong place at the wrong time. Just remember to pick yourself back up, take a deep breath, and take another go at it. Mentally, physically, and financially, it's tough - but it's also an amazing learning experience. THis is weird to say...but I'm almost glad I was rejected so many times. The program I was accepted to was my top choice (I had never applied in the past), and I couldn't be happier. I am so much happier with this acceptance than I would have been with any of the other I interviewed at. Congratulations on all who were accepted, and best of luck to those who continue their application journeys.
  22. 2 points
    Accepted my offer to Dal. Released URegina Good luck!
  23. 2 points
    I'm new to psychology as a profession. With previous grad school applications, when I was on a watilist, it was perfectly acceptable to ask for updates about status and, often, schools would offer updates without me asking. From what people are saying here, this seems like it's different in psychology. As I'm sure you all can sympathize with, I'm getting really anxious as April 15th approaches. I would love to get an update on my chances, but that seem uncouth in this field. So, 1. am I right? 2. who else is currently at the mercy of one or more waitlists?
  24. 2 points
    IceCream & MatSci

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    Sooo, after April 9th means Aptil 10th, right???
  25. 2 points
    wildsurmise

    What would you choose?

    Thanks for all this sound advice. So as an update, I was pretty much committed to Duquesne especially after reading all this, but then Wake offered me a $10,000 stipend... And after talking with students there, no one seems to be going further into debt, and they have time to work part-time jobs to make ends meet pretty comfortably. Duquesne is still offering more money, but the program seems more rigorous at Wake (based off of my perhaps faulty one day visits). There are professors I like and share interests with at both places. Oh the conflict!!
  26. 2 points
    milka49

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    Just three nightmares in the past week. I guess either I'm more pessimistic than you or dreams have predictive power and I'm getting straight P's and F's. Maybe this means you get HM?
  27. 2 points
    American here who completely agrees with you.
  28. 2 points
    Hopeful2019

    DrPH Applicants Fall 2019

    Hi all, I got taken off the waitlist from Hopkins last week Looking forward to meeting everyone during the Summer institute!
  29. 2 points
    I just released my offer from UVic and accepted UWindsor so hopefully someone moves up on the waitlist!
  30. 2 points
    Guys, I have finished the MPP at LKY in 2017 and regarding the housing: If you got the full scholarship, your housing is covered as well. That means that the 1k per month for a room at CG are included and the stipend is on top. That was during my time and unless they have changed that, you will have a comfortable life. I can't imagine they provide you with a stipend and let you pay CG on your own, since housing is a major cost. You can also check this link of the FAQ and under the financial aid and tuition fee section, point 3, it tells you that shared housing is included in the scholarship. So again, if you get the scholarship, congrats, you are super safe. Best
  31. 2 points
    Just accepted my offer from Dalhousie! If there's any other new Dal students lurking shoot me a message. Hope this opens a spot on the UTSC waitlist for someone.
  32. 1 point
    cullenish

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    2am eastern tomorrow, so yeah Tuesday. T-minus 10 hours!
  33. 1 point
    kankoushitai

    2019-2020 Boren Applicants

    Wow, already may hear this week? I’m so glad the wait is almost over but I’m also a bit terrified. I applied for a Fellowship but only heard from Boren Asia about the first budget email. Would like to know if anyone got a second one as well...
  34. 1 point
    The Last Byzantine

    Applications 2019

    Finally got some good news: I was admitted to Central European University's MA program in Late Antique, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies with a full tuition waiver, so it looks like I'll be in Vienna for the next two years. After a 4 month slog of non-stop disappointment, it's nice to end my season with some good news.
  35. 1 point
    feralgrad

    Admission

    Hi, Younis. I think this question belongs in the Waiting it Out board or one of the discipline-specific boards. You'll likely get better information there.
  36. 1 point
    DD5

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    I know people were saying that they're giving out less awards this year so I checked the solicitation that was put up while we were applying. The solicitation said they were giving out 2000 awards. I think the solicitation that's on the website now is for the next 3 years, not us.
  37. 1 point
    md@

    NSF GRFP 2018-2019

    Was doing great, but now that April 9 is approaching, panic starting to ensue... just me? Thankfully no GFRP dreams for me.. yet
  38. 1 point
    I would take the money. That's a credential in itself.
  39. 1 point
    Motherof4

    DrPH Applicants Fall 2019

    Congratulations!!
  40. 1 point
    14SLP14

    Different jobs for grad students

    I know a lot of people babysit or nanny! And I've heard waitressing is a good one too. $21 is a lot though wow!
  41. 1 point
    speech97

    Different jobs for grad students

    That’s a pretty decent rate to receive and the flexibility is a huge plus. I would stick with it if I were you but you shouldn’t be miserable doing one thing just for the money! Definitely look for something around the same pay and flexibility and if you can’t then at least you can say that you tried! Good luck! Additionally- I work at a Sunday respite program for children with developmental disabilities and that’s all I do. (Not in grad school yet) It’s the same pay. If it isn’t about the money for you I’d maybe look for something similar like that!
  42. 1 point
    I went to Ford Spring Preview - happy to address further questions and/or hear the perspectives from others that attended Ford as well. I will be attending Ford this fall for the following reasons: Faculty: This was the biggest factor in my decision and one that I was not prioritizing going into Spring Preview. However, the Faculty Panel and lunch changed my tune. The faculty at Ford are doing very cool things and were quite approachable. The Director of Academics shared with us that all Ford Faculty are evaluated not only on research and teaching but also service. As such there seems to be a lot of opportunities to get involved in on the ground projects with faculty, and that faculty address real world issues in real time pertaining to their fields of focus. Many faculty also have appointments in other schools which brings a different lens to instruction. Curriculum Flexibility: My impression at Ford is that the program follows a “choose your own adventure” approach, although they do have formalized tracks should students seek a more structured route. This was important to me as I am unsure of which policy area I would like to pursue; currently leaning towards health policy but I have several areas of interest. I tis also heavily encouraged to take courses in other departments. Michigan makes it easy to cross-enroll and they pride themselves on that. Additionally, Ford leadership is invested in revamping their curriculum--they seek feedback from Ford alumni on ways they can improve the program. That is one the reasons why they rolled out formalized tracks. They are also evaluating ways they can reinvent how they teach econ to graduate students in a way that is more applicable for professional settings. Geographic Spread: I was worried initially that Ford's imprint in DC metro and west coast would be limited due to their Midwestern location. These are the two areas that I see myself post-graduation. I was pleasantly surprised to hear that DC has the largest base of Ford alumni and California is within the top 6 locations in which Ford graduates gravitate towards. The others in the Top 6: Michigan, D.C., International, California, New York, and Illinois. This is based on roughly 4 years of both internship and FT data that was shared by Ford's Graduate Career Services staff. Dean and Program Funding: The Dean has an extensive background in policy, politics, and law. He has worked in the administrations for two Presidents, including management of special task force and headed up an an agency. As such, he is very much attune to what the MPP is, its value, and importance of forming connections on the Hill. From what students shared he has also increased the amount of donations the Ford School received. This has allowed them to do things like open up the new Diplomacy Center (Weiser) and further invest in international opportunities for students. He also makes himself available to students by offering office hours once a month. He also came by to greet students throughout the day and wish us congratulations. Other things to keep in mind: Facilities: underwhelming relative to other graduate schools on campus (e.g. Law School, Business School, School of Public Health). It is definitely an older building with less focus on natural light and spaces to congregate for group work. etc. Policy vs. Adminstration: the Ford School is definitely policy-centric as opposed to management/administration centric. Something to keep in mind for anyone more interested in managing an agency or other public/NGO entity vs. policy making. Students: It was hard to gage the incoming class as most folks were still considering multiple offers (from Harris, HKS, Sanford, and Columbia were the ones most frequently mentioned. I also met a young people there (defined as individuals with two or fewer years of experience), but again, this may have been random coincidence and not truly representative of the incoming class. The individuals I interacted with left me feeling underwhelmed but again that may have been a bad draw of who I interacted with. Thus, I spent majority of my time interacting with the current cohorts and faculty to understand who the Ford student is. The students were friendly, a mix of extroverts and introverts, and very honest. I met military members and students with families. A professor described the ideal Ford student as "a realist that is optimistic about addressing social problems" while another said simply "they genuinely care about doing good in the world." Cost of Attendance: Faculty, alumni, and current students were very upfront about money. Faculty I interacted with stressed the importance of funding and taking that into the decision making process--even if that meant they would have to decline Ford. I was amazed how open people were about this. There were a lot of alumni who attended Ford with no funding, but have since been advocating the school provide heavier tuition assistance. However they enjoyed their experience and did not regret attending. Similarly, there were also Ford students who turned down funding elsewhere to attend but they were able to justify their rationale. Diversity & Inclusion: Ford (and University of Michigan as an institution) is very aware they have issues with diversity & inclusion and are actively working to make faculty and the student body more inclusive. The Dean was very transparent about their efforts, as were the students. I'm used to being in spaces lacking diversity so this was refreshing to hear and glad the Dean addressed it head on as part of his opening.
  43. 1 point
    Information on: Scholarship - Housing - Dual Degree and Exchange Program Hey Everyone! First of all congratulations to all of those got their confirmation letters! I noticed few questions which were repeated and considering I was in the same position as you 1 year ago, I will just share my experience at LKY till now. 1) Between LSE and LKY. As someone pointed it out, if you want to stay in Europe, LSE makes more sense. Further, if it is for work with multinational organizations like UN, WB etc, I would still recommend LSE. The International World Order is still very euro-centric and even in Asia, the kind of value that a LSE degree has, is better than a LKY one. Honestly, you have 6/8 courses (core courses) in 1st year which dont even provide you any Asia specific context so you will not be losing out on much by not coming here. But just in terms of better job prospects and name recall, I would recommend LSE. 2) Housing - For all those who are on scholarships which do not cover housing (~ SGD 1350), you dont need to worry much. CG accommodation costs around 960 SGD per month + your utility charges (usually 20-50 dollars per month based on your usage). CG is honestly preferred because easier to do group work, 10 minute walk from school and a fantastic place to live in. CG also has an RA system for which 2 juniors (that is your cohort) members will be selected. The mail will come to you sometime in June. Basically as a CG RA, you will get 50% off your CG rent so that should take care of it. I dont think the hassle of staying outside CG is worth it honestly. Yeah well you might spend some more out of your pocket or have to live on frugal spending, but the constant 1/2 hour or 40 minute travel to school and having to come over if there are meetings and stuff, is not worth it. Also, you will be missing out on so many fun gatherings and parties! 3) Dual Degree and Exchange - LKY sadly doesnt have an exchange with LSE but it does have a dual degree program partnership. Exchange as someone mentioned, is with Science Po, John Hopkis, Hertie and a bunch of other schools. If you are on exchange, you continue getting your full scholarship amount. However, if you go for double degree, the school stops your scholarship and you have to finance your education at the new institution. 4) Grading - Yes LKY follows a bell curve. 33% of the class gets between A+ to A. The curve tapers off at C so most of the class lies in the B- B+ range. You should honestly not worry about this much. Hope this helped! If you have any other questions, just tag it on this thread and I will get back to you soon. Congratulations again!
  44. 1 point
    akraticfanatic

    Final Outcomes

    I accepted an offer from UMass this week!
  45. 1 point
    historygeek

    Applications 2019

    Attended Nova's Admitted Students Day and couldn't be happier with my choice!
  46. 1 point
    josh97

    University of Toronto MIRHR 2019 Forum

    Hey! I've been accepted into both UofT's MIRHR advanced standing option and Queen's MIR as well. Ultimately, I decided to go to Toronto for several factors. First is fairly personal, but I'm from Hamilton and did my undergrad at McMaster, so it's a lot closer to home (as well as some pressure from my parents). Secondly, from what I've heard Toronto's program has a lot more faculty and resources towards both the HR and union side of things. Queen's apparently is more focused on the IR rather than HR (although HR is included). Additionally, Toronto is the #1 ranked school in Canada and it's hard to decline that. However, if you didn't get an advanced standing option it might just be worth it to go to Queen's since it's only a year. Factors I took into consideration as well, was how Toronto seems to be very cut throat (although since this is a graduate program, I think we've all deemed ourselves to be hard workers). Additionally, Toronto seems to be a bit confusing, with the campus being integrated into the Downtown of the city. Either choice seems to be a good option. Both seem to provide good networking opportunities in the public and private sector. I'm only concerned I might not finish with the conditions they set on me, however, I've been working hard to make sure I don't fall behind. I've heard Queen's is a little bit more lenient on their conditions, so I haven't completely cut them out of the picture yet.
  47. 1 point
    I know unaffected people's opinions shouldn't matter, but I'm tired of being pressured to compromise my career for my boyfriend's by the more traditional males in my life.. it's just irritating to constantly be held to a double standard.
  48. 1 point
    After waiting and waiting, happy to say I got two acceptances today! Guess I'll be going to graduate school this year after all!
  49. 1 point
    Has anyone actually heard back about the Clarendon. My department said that we should hear back by end March but no one seems to have heard anything but then again the number of scholarships are really small too :(.
  50. 1 point
    As everyone, from your professors to the adcoms to the posters on this board, has been telling you over and over again, you don't need flexibility. You need focus. If you were actually ready for this next step, you wouldn't be asking us which languages to take. You would know. An MA on the way to a PhD is a time to refine your area of study, not discover it. You have extremely limited time and need to hit the ground running; many of the people you will be competing against started their language training in middle school. At the very least, at this point you need to be able to articulate a time period, a geographic region, and a structural approach (e.g. I want to study the south of France during the central middle ages through the lens of postcolonial theory). How else are you supposed to pick what to take? You come across as interested in the idea of having a PhD rather than any particular subject of study. Nothing you've said instills confidence that you've even begun to plan to fix this. Unless you do, your next application cycle will go no better than your last. I would strongly suggest you take @TMP's advice, look into your deferral options, and spend some time meditating on your own motivations and desires..


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