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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Applicants

    Arriving in Dallas tonight after my (third) 12 hour day on the road. Ahhhhh itโ€™s all happening!
  2. 2 points
    northwestnative

    2020 Applicants

    Can second this, although mandelbulb's advice will probably be better than mine. Any questions about the application process, applying from an MA, applying after a year off, and American lit/pomo/religion stuff, please feel free to reach out!
  3. 2 points
    Not to be brash, but this seems absurd. What do you really get out of it? Do you want to be known as the person who got two PhDs in surprisingly similar fields, and half-assed both of them?
  4. 2 points
    mandelbulb

    2020 Applicants

    hey y'all. just want to pop by and offer myself up for anyone with questions about 1) applying during the last year of your MA, 2) applying after your MA, 3) applying again after being rejected the first time, 4) applying to MAs after being out of school for 5+ years/being older and applying, or 4) UCSD! if your research interests overlap with mine at all, i may have time to take a look at your SOP just DM. otherwise, i'll be lurking in case there's any question i can help answer.
  5. 2 points
    bibliophile222

    Supplies and essentials

    1. Some sort of planning system, whether it's a physical planner or on your phone/computer. There are so many moving pieces in grad school that I can't imagine not using a planner--I'd probably forget about half my deadlines! And this is coming from someone who NEVER used a planner before grad school! 2. A working laptop. Pretty much everyone in my cohort brings their laptop to school every day to take notes or just do work. It does NOT have to be fancy, just something that is fairly portable and not likely to break down anytime soon, ideally with a decent battery life. If you already have a nice computer, then that's fine, but don't feel like you have to get the latest MacBook Air or anything that will wreck your budget! 3. A clipboard with storage. Mine has enough room to hold miscellaneous papers for 2-3 clients at a time, my audio recorder, and a couple pens. 4. An audio recorder that ISN'T your phone. Seriously. Most people just use their phone as an audio backup, but some people have had trouble with their phones stopping part-way through if they also decide to record video or use a phone app during the session. I have this audio recorder here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XFTWCBJ/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and I absolutely adore it. The sound quality is excellent and it has a USB drive so I can download files onto my computer. 5. Nice pens! You'll be doing a lot of writing, so you might as well use pens that make you happy. I'm partial to Pentel Energels. 6. A lot of people will say a laminator. Honestly, so far I haven't seen the need for it. I've used self-adhesive laminating sheets for the few things I've needed laminated, so I don't think a laminator would have been worth it for me. Also, some schools have a laminator for student use, so I would double-check before you buy anything pricey. 7. I don't think it's worth buying a penlight unless your school/internships have a strict no-phone policy in sessions. I use my phone flashlight and it does just fine. But to each their own, I guess. 8. Maybe this should have been in the top five... Clinic-appropriate clothes! On-campus clinics tend to have stricter dress codes than your placement sites--for instance, I can wear sneakers at my placement, but not in our on-campus clinic. Get a good variety of business casual clothing: pants that aren't jeans, blouses, cardigans, skirts/dresses, close-toed shoes that aren't sneakers ๐Ÿ˜ž No cleavage, no exposed skin when you bend over or raise your arms, nothing really tight, and definitely wear pants if you're playing on the floor! 9. Miscellaneous office supplies! Our grad room has scissors and tape, but I've had to use my own post-it notes, paperclips, and index cards. 10. As far as any toys/games/materials go, I say skip it unless you're sure that you want to work in a school and need to start slowly accumulating materials. The school clinic and placements should have everything you need. If they don't, just do what your supervisor does and make do. Grad school is expensive enough as it is! Plus, if you're forced to make do with what you have, it makes you adaptable and hones your creativity! 11. A combo printer/scanner/copier (this should also have been in the top five). This one isn't essential, just super convenient. Your school will probably have a printer you can use for clinic stuff, but ours isn't in color, so I have to use mine at home if I want color. Also, some professors are better than others with going digital, so some of them may give you a lot of handouts, and once you scan them you can get rid of them. I'll add on if I think of anything else!
  6. 1 point
    I'm not great at evaluating international students' profiles, so don't put too much weight on my thoughts -- just a word of caution. I'd be inclined to take your professor's thoughts as they are; Ohio State and Florida seem like reasonable places for you. The B+ in Calc III shouldn't mean much given the time and classes you've had since then, and the B+ in probability shouldn't mean too much either; those aren't even bad grades, really. I do get the sense that you aren't really as concerned as you say, though, since you largely are considering schools higher-ranked than Ohio State and Florida. Looking at some schools above that level is a good idea, of course, but I'm not quite sure how good your chances of getting into Columbia Stat or Brown Applied Math would be; again, I'm not good at evaluating international students' profiles, so that is a bit of a shot in the dark for me. I'd tell you to stay more in that range of Penn State through Ohio State and Florida, with maybe a couple above it (like NC State and Duke, as you have), plus a bit more coverage below Ohio State and Florida for additional choice later-on. Maybe your research experience would bump you beyond what I'm saying, but I just don't really know how to judge that very well. I'm not an ecologist or anything resembling it, so my area knowledge of it is completely lacking. We did recently have a thread of schools that work on environmental statistics, which might be helpful -- schools that came up there were NC State, Ohio State, and Oregon State. Additionally, Cyberwulf at one time mentioned some biostatisticians who do environmental statistics, such as Roger Peng (Johns Hopkins Biostat), Francesca Dominici (Harvard Biostat), and Amy Herring (Duke Statistics). I think the University of Georgia has a good ecology school (one of the Odums worked there), but I don't know that their statistics department is very involved in that work; even so, you could look there. I think UNC is tied to the Odums as well, so you might look there as well (along with Florida, so Wikipedia informs me). Duke Statistics also used to have a professor who explicitly worked on statistics in ecology (Alan Gelfand), but it seems like he retired recently. Hopefully this helps, and if you'd like, it wouldn't be a bad idea to consult with your professor some more too to make sure of your choices (their time and willingness allowing).
  7. 1 point
    LEANCO10

    I failed my thesis.

    @Adelaide9216 Thank you for sharing this incredibly challenging moment in your academic life. If you are well known in your field then this is only a temporary set back regardless of the outcome. I've only read a few of the comments but your situation is eye-opening and will absolutely be a teaching moment for others in the forum. Wishing you the best!
  8. 1 point
    illcounsel

    2019 Applicants

    What are you going to do with your time before school starts?!
  9. 1 point
    What is your end goal? A PhD in School Psychology would likely offer more specified training in terms of studying/assessment for ASD, as well as the population age focus. The University of Houston's School Psychology program has some research on ASD, depending on what area of ASD you want to focus on. I think it would be prudent to look at Clinical programs, but the time to completion might be longer as well as the potential conflict of career areas (unless Licensed Psychologist or academia is your focus.) I am also looking at School Psych PhD programs with emphasis on assessment of ASD and PDD, so best of luck to you!
  10. 1 point
    You're in the field so probably have a better perspective than I do, but my understanding is that school psychology is primarily a professionally oriented degree where you learn how to conduct and report assessments related to disabilities and development. ASD is a clinical disorder and clinical programs are much more research-oriented, so I do agree you'll probably have better luck searching there.
  11. 1 point
    Rachel Watts

    I failed my thesis.

    OMG, this is so unfair. I believe this time everything will settle, and you get what you actually deserve. Good luck!
  12. 1 point
    Duns Eith

    Best option for Bioethics MA

    Here seem to be common bioethics MAs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_masters_programs_in_bioethics#United_States[51] The two programs you mentioned are on that list. Another way to go about this is to consult the list of funded MAs in philosophy, created by Geoff Pynn https://www.academia.edu/9666729/Funded_MA_Programs_in_Philosophy (also attached, in case you don't have Academia.edu account) ....and then look at some of the programs that sound enticing whether they have two or three faculty who do bioethics as a research interest (specialty ideally, competence minimum). @hector549 gave some great advice. One thing I want to emphasize is that you need to discern whether you're going for a specialization in ethics under the umbrella of "Medical Humanities". For example, this conference https://wmich.edu/medicalhumanities/events/conference2019 ... If you see past programs in the archive, you'll notice that the speakers include a blend of doctors, philosophers, counselors, nurses, etc. who have an eye toward reforming policies and being sensitive to the impact of new technologies (https://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u755/2018/2018_Conference_Program_1.pdf). Most people there, though, are philosophically interested, but not formally trained in philosophy as a rigorous enterprise. That is, they find the topics important and urgent, but many don't necessarily know how to separate the critical questions out and untangle the issues with nuance you expect for philosophy at a graduate level. Still a good venue. Still a good network. Just pointing out a difference. Funded_MA_Programs_in_Philosophy.pdf
  13. 1 point
    Adelaide9216

    The Positivity Thread

    One of my op-eds got published! And another pitch got accepted to another newspaper!
  14. 1 point
    maxhgns

    List of Analytical Schools

    The default setting in Anglophone countries is broadly "analytic", though many such schools have a significant continental bent nonetheless. As Glasperlenspieler says, pick a subfield of "analytic" philosophy and then check the specialty rankings for that subfield.
  15. 1 point
    Glasperlenspieler

    List of Analytical Schools

    A lot of this is going to depend on what you mean by "analytic" but I would say that the majority of PhD granting programs are analytic in some sense or another. There's a world of difference between David Lewis style metaphysics, naturalistic approaches to philosophy of mind, or Rawlsian political philosophy even though those could all be understood as "analytic." A lot of people will claim that the Philosophical Gourmet Report (here) is representative of analytic philosophy. I'm not sure that's quite right, but it's at least a good starting place, especially if you take a look at the specialty rankings. (A lot of people will complain about the PGR on here and there are certainly some legitimate concerns which you can easily find by looking around these boards, but I don't think they entirely negate it's value.)
  16. 1 point
    Adelaide9216

    I failed my thesis.

    My thesis advisor apologized to me today. She said I should not have failed and she entirely understands the pressure I am feeling right now.
  17. 1 point
    Sigaba

    I failed my thesis.

    I am sorry that you're in pain right now. I hope that you're able to navigate the tangled path that awaits. I agree. @Adelaide9216, I very strongly recommend that you do your best to put aside your understandable sense of disappointment and your other feelings when you read through the comments. The exercise should be more than just doing what you need to do to satisfy a stern critic. I urge you to assume good faith on that individual's part. I recommend that you step away from thoughts about going to the dean if she doesn't do what you want her to do. Yes, it may come to that, but if you approach the revisions with that option in mind, your emotions may get in the way for an opportunity for intellectual and personal growth. I suggest that you look at this unfortunate outcome as a temporary set back and an opportunity for professional and intellectual growth in addition to how you feel about it personally. I recommend that you develop a plan of action with a time table. What follows are very broad brush /YMMV recommendations. I suggest that the first item on the list should be to put your thesis and the comments aside for at least one entire week so you can spend time working with your feelings. Then, reread a clean copy of your thesis in one long sitting. A day or two later, study the critical comments assuming good faith on the reviewers part. There will be points that resonate, others that you can take or leave, and some that are likely nitpicking. From this study, develop talking points for a discussion between yourself and the reviewer. This conversation could be attended by your advisor or not, as you see fit. (I would recommend doing it alone.) I would recommend that the conversation involve more listening on your part than talking. (The desire to debate will be almost overwhelming, but please try to put that aside.) After this conversation, take a break of a day or two. Then, revisit the list of recommended changes and, point by point, develop a matrix of what has to be changed, what might be changed, and (if necessary) where you're going to hold your ground. From there, develop a time table that sees you working on the revisions and checking in with your advisor and the reviewer. The objective of these check-ins is to make sure that everyone is on the same page IRT what you're going to do and (if necessary) what you're not going to do. Concurrently, do what you can to assemble a couple of red teams who will take one and only one look at all or parts of the revised thesis with a critical eye and very sharp blue pencils (if possible.) Throughout, you will need to find a healthy balance of paying attention to how you feel while not letting those feelings overwhelm the process. To paraphrase, the woman rides the horse, not the other way around.
  18. 1 point
    Hope.for.the.best

    I failed my thesis.

    I am sorry to hear that your thesis was failed, but I am also glad that you are persisting and working hard to try again. Unfortunately, failure happens all the time in research. I got a paper that was rejected twice before it got published. Guess what? Everyone in my department thought the work was great. I know your advisor is nice to work with and she wants you all the best. However, I am concerned about her lack of guidance and overestimation of your ability to do research, as you indicated. If it is a communication problem, then find ways to improve it. It would be difficult for her to offer guidance if she is not aware that you are struggling. This is easy to solve. If it is an issue of expertise and experience, then it is a red flag. An advisor should be able to identify obvious flaws in your research and warn you about that. Ideally, they should work with you to sort them out. There are strict examiners out there, but a thesis that receives a fail must have some serious issues. Are you going to stay with the same advisor for your PhD? If so, then you need to consider carefully. I am not saying that you should not choose her, but you need to ensure that all the issues leading to the fail of your master thesis are resolved. Otherwise, you risk working very hard on your PhD only to receive a fail again in the end. Having been with toxic advisors, I reckon the importance of having an advisor that "loves" you, but they also need to be able to help you succeed. My apology if I sounded too harsh. I was just trying to offer some objective thoughts. I am by no means saying that your advisor is bad. Feel free to PM me and chat =]
  19. 1 point
    Meraki

    I failed my thesis.

    I'm really sorry to hear about the situation. I will say that I am impressed with how you've already pulled together a plan and are not being too hard on yourself. It is unfortunate that you did not have the guidance you needed. It's great that you have a good relationship with your advisor, but I think it was wise to ask about having another set of eyes on your work. You have clear feedback and it seems you have good odds at pulling through. I wish you the best of luck.
  20. 1 point
    Adelaide9216

    I failed my thesis.

    I'm also happy that I am self-confident enough that I don't see this failure as a failure of who I am in terms of intelligence and ability. I know this is also a matter of the fact that I have received very little guidance on the part of my supervisor throughout my master's degree. This is the second time that something backfires in my master's degree, and both times, she never warned me, prepared me or anticipated it. But I won't tell her that because I know she loves me a lot, and probably feels very guilty already. I'm sure that out of all of her students, she surely did not expect me to fail. She knows me, my work ethic, and the fact that I am a hard and dedicated student. But my family was very upset when they learned I had failed because I spent the last year complaining to them about how I felt like I did not have as much feedback as I wanted to. I almost had to defend her. I had to clarify with my family that my supervisor does not have bad intentions towards me. She definetly wants me to succeed. But I think she was overly confident in my ability to do this and did not offer me enough guidance.
  21. 1 point
    First of all, if the person said this to you in a way that was obviously meant to be negative then that person is a) an asshole, and b) probably has some issues of their own that makes them take issue with your silence. I think most people in general say things like this because they genuinely want to know what you think about something. People who don't speak up a lot tend to seem "mysterious" and for many people that allows them to project their own ideas onto what is behind the mystery. Sometimes, they associate negative things that are entirely unrelated to you. It's hard, but unless these negative things are actually detrimental to your career, you should try to let them roll off you. I am personally a sort of weird hybrid of socially anxious introvert who is also not afraid to speak up for myself. I think the second part comes with age. One thing that I find helps me to speak up when necessary is being really prepared. I don't get (very) anxious doing public speaking if I know what I'm talking about, but when I have to speak off the cuff I have issues. Even when off the cuff is like doing that horrible "introduce yourself to the group" thing. So, I guess my advice as far as academic stuff goes is to practice, practice, practice. I'm not in grad school yet, so take this for what its worth, but I would say even when it comes to lab meetings or seminars, maybe think ahead and make some notes for yourself about things you might speak about, practice saying them before you go. I think the more you do speak up and people appreciate what you have to say, the more that will build your confidence as well.
  22. 1 point
    So, what surprised me most....? What surprised me most was that some web pages to program information are buried deep within the schools website with no logical way of navigating to it. I originally had my heart set on going to grad school in Boston, and decided to check out Tufts for s&g's. I am not sure how I found it, but I somehow navigated to one particular option for program that turned out to be of related interest. I emailed a professor associated with this niche, gave him some info about me, what I am looking for in a grad program, etc...and he emailed me back...to offer his support....and to sit on my advisory committee when/if I was accepted... but wasn't taking students that year. Since I was not applying at that time, I filed it away. Since then I have gotten a new computer and for the life of me could not find that darn page. It didn't occur to me to check my email... I just pulled up his email, and was able to search his name and found his lab. I have applied to a school on the West Coast that has a similar "issue" as Tufts...the particular niche group/lab I am applying to has no logical way of navigating to it, yet, the webpage in question is a part of the university website and not some random faculty member's webpage. Then there was the issue of funding...or lack there of. I had developed a good conversation with the PI of a particular lab at another school, and initiated a meeting. It wasn't an interview, mind you, I just happened to be visiting that area and since I was already going to be near, thought I'd pop in. We had a good chat, he gave me a tour, and so on. Everything was awesome. Then, at the end, he mentions that his funding is running out and even though he has secured new funding, that new funding would not kick in for another year. And that he may or may not already have a full lab. He didn't exactly say that he was not taking on new students into his lab, but kind of hinted that I should consider applying to another lab....even making a recommendation as to which one...or that I might have to pay for the first year out of pocket...Still applied, though. Speaking of websites, I noticed at least two programs had two different due dates each...depending on which part of the website you were on.


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