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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/03/2019 in all areas

  1. lkaitlyn

    I failed my thesis.

    I'd contact the department head and director of the grad school, personally, to let them know what's going on re: the deadline. No harm in CC'ing General Counsel (the university's legal department) either. If they're breaking their own policies and that causes you to lose your scholarship, that makes them liable. Probably better to contact them now instead of after the deadline. I know that sounds aggressive, but advocating for yourself is really important, and it's better to be prepared by contacting people earlier than having to do it later, IMO. Wishing you luck.
    1 point
  2. If you have a Professor writing you a recommendation, they aren't going to mind looking over your SOP and providing some pointers. Go into the prior application cycle threads and see what people have to say about what they thought made their applications successful or not. Some people put in those threads that they are willing to share SOPs.
    1 point
  3. You are under no obligation to spend your time mentoring these people. I'm sure they're eager and respectful about their requests and I'm sure they would learn from what you can teach them, but that does not mean you need to sacrifice your time for them. I don't mean to come off sounding like a jerk, but don't be afraid to say no if you feel like you have to. You have a lot going on. Prioritize yourself.
    1 point
  4. Establishing a website with a blog and a supportive and diverse group of graduate students and young scholars is the first idea that pops into my head. This would require a lot of upfront work, but gives you the opportunity to spread the workload and get different opinions on specific questions and worries.
    1 point
  5. I'm finishing a 1-year MA program in the UK and I'm happy with my decision to have done it, but for two me-specific reasons: (1) I was lucky enough to be able to do the program without going into debt, and (2) I was wildly underprepared for applying to PhD programs as an undergrad and absolutely needed to complete a terminal MA before applying to PhDs. As others have mentioned, a funded US PhD or a funded 2-year MA degree in the US will almost always be better options – because they're paying you to be there instead of the other way round, because they are generally more well respected by PhD
    1 point
  6. Hi OP, I'm currently finishing up a 1-year MA in the UK, and prepping for PhD apps. Like the poster above me, I can't really comment on differences in application since I did not apply to any PhD programmes in parallel with the MA ones, but if you have any questions about the experience of doing an MA here I'd be happy to help out! As has already been mentioned, funding is going to be an issue when applying. There are some scholarships available from what I've seen and heard, but in my experience they have been quite scarce and very competitive, so relying on that will definitely not help.
    1 point
  7. I think it's fantastic you're already beginning to consider these issues! To preface what I'm pretty certain will be a somewhat long-winded response, I'll say that I applied this season and had moderate success. I have no idea how much my SoP was significant for my results; the minor feedback I've received so far by my acceptances had to do with my WS rather than my SoP. In retrospect, though there are significant changes I would make with my WS, I'm pretty happy with my SoP and don't feel like it was a detriment to my app. In any case, writing the SoP is a pretty individual process, so take t
    1 point
  8. So I'm in the home stretch of my sixth year so I'm now pretty much a greybeard by this board's standards, so take this as hoary wisdom or as the ramblings of a cranky old man. Has your PhD so far been what you expected it to be? Yes and no. Yes in the sense that I feel like I'm experiencing the freedom to pursue intellectual ideas and really living the sort of life I imagined it would be, with the kind of flexibility of life and freedom of mind I expected. No in the sense that I didn't expect that the stress and pressure to make something out of that life would break me multiple time
    1 point
  9. Hey there. Good questions. 1. If you are at a campus visit, the school is trying to woo you. They are probably not going to answer the "hard" (but important) questions that will actually be helpful, like "Is this department toxic?" or "Will I receive the full support I need here?" Grad students may be more open about this kind of thing than professors, so I would just try to talk to as many grad students as you can during your visit who work in similar areas to you, and try to get a sense of both the opportunities and challenges that those students have faced. Ask where they are now in th
    1 point
  10. Current 2nd year PhD student at a flagship Midwest school here. This time a couple years ago, I was deciding between 4 fully funded PhD program offers and even though each of them would have been great places to attend, I basically have never regretted my decision to choose the school I'm at now. To be honest, one of the main reasons I ended up choosing the school i I did and I think a really important factor to take into consideration (if your programs are all pretty much ranked the same, which mine were — ranked around 20 on the US News Report, whatever that's worth and all generally strong
    1 point


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