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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/13/2019 in all areas

  1. AAngelo

    Harris 2020

    me too!!!! I hope we hear tomorrow!
    1 point
  2. @alyssafrancis Makes total sense! You're considerate / careful with looking at their stats..alot of people don't do that and they can be outdated... so I always ask to make sure-- but thats just me! I personally prefer a holistic school but honestly all of your decision-making sounds really solid! Thanks for sharing! Fingers crossed it all works out. My only advice is get started and finish early. Don't stress over it but really just get the ball moving and it will be over shortly I'm here with ya!
    1 point
  3. al12345678

    Harris 2020

    Dying over here!!! .. how is everyone doing?
    1 point
  4. I agree completely, though I would mention two caveats: 1. Placement is in many ways a backwards looking metric. If a program does a good job of placing its graduates in 2020, that means it was a good place to choose to attend in 2014. It's not a guarantee that the program will be as successful in 2026. Though one can usually assume that there will be at least some continuity here. 2. Not all attrition is bad. In particular, attrition in the first couple years of a program is a better sign than attrition later on. If graduate school (or that specific program) doesn't make sense for
    1 point
  5. I had similar research experience (~3 good experiences and a poster presentation) and a very similar GRE score (312, 4,5 AW) when I applied. I was accepted to two programs ranked 50-100 last application cycle (I applied to mainly top 50s and a few 50-100). I'm not sure how similar social and cognitive psych are as far as competitiveness goes, though. Feel free to pm if you have any questions
    1 point
  6. Duns Eith

    What Should I Do?

    I think since you're engaging with a topic that is at the intersection of ethics and phil action, you are in good shape for being accessible to a wide audience for the admissions committee. If you get that writing sample done, this sounds like you've got a competitive app. Don't worry about the GRE. It matters the least. It matters, but your writing sample matters far, far, far more. If you are devoting more time to your GRE prep than you are your writing sample, I might say to just accept your verbal trajectory right now and put all the effort into the WS. It is November,
    1 point
  7. Thank you. I know it's gonna put me back in debt, but Baylor is the only school out of three that accepted me. I can't relocate, so I am limited to only a few options. I figure it'll pay off in the long run. I wish you much luck and I hope that you hear back soon from the school that is best for you! BTW I will be in January 2020 track.
    1 point
  8. I think you should add some higher-ranked schools to your list. It's hard to do much better than you did, so if your letters are really strong then you might be an intriguing candidate for some pretty good places.
    1 point
  9. Thank you so much for all the valuable suggestions. @Romedy Kudos to you for your perseverence! And thanks a ton for sharing the lessons you learned. Helps a lot! @t_ruth Happy to hear a PI's POV. Thank you for piching in! I will reach out to faculty in my areas of interest :) @HACand @Psygeek - I will look into opportunities for hands-on research while I explore the Master's option. Thanks for the pointer. @PsyDGrad90 I have zero background in psychology apart from a 101 and the first year undergrad level statistics/research methods course. Thats why I think a master's wi
    1 point
  10. I can only speak about Heinz, but if you're concerned about your quant background, apply anyway. For what its worth, your GRE scores are in the average range for MSPPM. Additionally, students with so-so math backgrounds can be admitted conditional on completing a Quantitative Skills Summer Program before classes start.
    1 point
  11. Sigaba

    At a crossroads

    Welcome to the GradCafe, @valley I recommend that you apply to at least one doctoral program (the University of Texas at Austin merits consideration) if you can write a strong statement of purpose in which you define your interests as a historian. No matter where you apply, do your best to find at least one common theme that ties your evolving interests together. From January through September, I recommend working on your German and diving into the deep end of modern German social history. Prepare yourself for pain. The going will be painful.
    1 point
  12. The distinction has some meaning, but it's also a lot easier to find a ranking list than it is to find a comparative list of placement rates for the past 5 years. I don't think a single metric is a good evaluation tool for anything, whether it's my program's rank or my GRE scores, but it counts as a warning sign.
    1 point
  13. OHSP

    2020 application thread

    I strongly advise against this as a policy--some professors receive an enormous number of emails from prospective students, as well as managing classes, current students, whatever else they have going on in their lives etc. People who did not respond to my emails while I was applying have turned out to be great advisors. Given your interests I would think more carefully about nyu.
    1 point
  14. Strong disagree. It's very straightforward: it is not at all worth it. Ranking of programs isn't some arbitrary thing. The reason why Harvard etc. always top the list is not simply because everyone's heard of them. They also have a lot more money to throw around, give their students a more reasonable teaching load, and can bring in important professors every week to socialize. The advantages are manifold. That said, ranking for grad progams isn't exactly a science. I definitely wouldn't go as far down the list as the 50s though. 10s at best.
    1 point
  15. I made the switch from a business/sales career to psychology in my early 30s. I ended up having to go back and get a second undergrad degree in psychology, but this only took 4 semesters. I then applied for PhD programs, but did not receive a single interview, and so applied to and was accepted into a master's program. It took 2 more tries to gain admission to a PhD program after completing my master's degree. I'm currently 37 and a first year student in a clinical psychology PhD program. Here are some things I learned (often the hard way!). I hope you find them helpful. 1. Research
    1 point
  16. I would throw this on biorxiv if it doesn't take time away from your applications. If it does, throw it on biorxiv after you apply. Why not put the info out there and put it on your CV
    1 point
  17. I came to my field (Ed Psych) after a career in an unrelated field and found it was a real benefit. I agree with all that PsyDGrad90 said. Also, you will have a better idea of your path once you have specific research questions you are interested in. A Masters can help give you time and exposure to come up with these questions, but it is expensive. For me, personally, I would love a student with a CS background (but I do work in ed tech). There may be other PIs who feel similarly in developmental and clinical (even outside of computational neuroscience).
    1 point
  18. I agree with the others. Look at the pre-req courses for PhD programs and see if you have those courses. If not, then a master's is a good route. I would suggest CUNY. They are significantly cheaper than Teacher's College and NYU, and there are tons of research opportunities. Depending on your niche subject area, you can choose which CUNY would be most appropriate for your interests. John Jay is more forensically based, Queens college is more neuroscience heavy, etc. As far as your concern about prestige, CUNY is a very highly rated R1 research university (for reference, while Columbia is an R
    1 point
  19. Check potential labs you want to work in. Do you think you NEED a master's/post-bac or would lab experience be enough to give you that push to a PhD?
    1 point
  20. Oh alright. Do you have any mentors in mind already? Have you also considered looking for RA jobs? I think a big part of any strong psychology application is research experience. You can gain experience in a masters but it may also be possible by working in a lab for some time and building up your resume that way as well.
    1 point
  21. I wouldn't add this to your CV. Most schools do ask whether you have applied for funding and you can also let your POI know. You can add CGS-M to your CV if you received the award or if you received and declined.
    1 point
  22. Here is a list of public health programs for MPH, DrPH, MS, and PhD that do not require the GRE. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1j-7-kThlYphF9D0HX1aSNFYl8ksFrIgD68Qz0njHYAY/edit#gid=0
    1 point
  23. Also, (heterosexual) men should be interested in women, not girls. I feel like that should be apparent.
    1 point
  24. They are. It's not the fact that there is an age difference that is the problem anyway. It is the amount of the age difference coupled with how young that makes them. A 70 year old courting a 60 year old is not creepy. A 23 year old seeking out a 13 year old is creepy. 30 to 19 is definitely on the creepy end. At 19 the frontal lobe (the part of the brain that houses the decision making processes) isn't even fully developed. For an adult to intentionally seek out someone a decade their junior when that makes that person a teenager is HIGHLY questionable. Falling for someone younger
    1 point
  25. Am I the only one who thinks it's super weird for a early to mid-20s person to actively seek out teenagers to befriend/date? @Comparativist you'd date someone just out of high school who can't even drink? Anyway, in my experience as a younger woman dating men your age, the problem with having a preference for younger women is that a lot of the time it comes from a place of immaturity or manipulation. Certainly if you articulate it as "younger women are more pleasant to be around". Because we don't have the wherewithal or courage to call you out on your bad behavior?
    1 point
  26. @Visualizer As a woman, I am going to be frank with you: much of what you are saying has predatory overtones. I was an undergrad not that long ago, and if a male graduate student had approached me seeking anything simply because I was an undergrad alarm bells would immediately be going off in my head. More than shared mental development is necessary to make a connection with another person. If you "find that you can really hit it off with people" why target a younger demographic? If you're already doing well socially, why change things? Where there is an age difference of any significance (spe
    1 point


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