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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/26/2020 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone. I will be starting my Ph.D. program this Fall, and I was curious if you have any ideas on what I should buy over the summer. I plan on getting a ton of notebooks of course, and I've heard a file cabinet comes in handy, but I was wondering what you wonderful folks thought. Thank you so much!!!
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  2. I think this is the proper forum for this? If not, my apologies! So, as it turns out, none of the schools that I was admitted to are anywhere near where I live. I've only ever made moves that were within a four-hour driving distance, so making multiple trips back and forth over a few months was no big deal. I'm unloading a lot of my possessions, but I do collect records and other band merch and I am a musician - so some of this stuff will be a pain to move! I'm assuming other people have been in a similar situation before. How easy is it to rent a trailer and pack it up? How about shippin
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  3. Starfinger10

    Canada MSW 2020

    I can confirm that this is 100% true. It's the WORST way to do us, especially during these times. When this is all over and I find out my status, I am going to complain. How does every other uni send out waitlist letters? WE ARE GETTING YORK'D Y'ALL
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  4. Probably hard to say in general. A lot of these rankings seem to be pretty heuristic. US news just seems to capture it better than most in America but we don't have anything like that in Canada. In my opinion, based on general reputation and faculty strength etc, I would probably list the top stats programs in Canada as: 1. U of T 2. UBC 3. McGill 4. Waterloo Personally I think UBC is an excellent choice and very strong overall. However particularly in causal inference, I think that McGill is probably the strongest in Canada, but that's one sub-field. If you decid
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  5. My diss committee has called this nothing less than the death throes of academia as we know it, which was a cheerful thought.
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  6. I declined and will be heading to a more affordable but very reputable school in Europe. Honestly, i think it's not worth bearing such a huge debt and enter any US school this time for this policy degree (I also declined Johns Hopkins and Columbia). I don't want to have a stressful life just to have a famous name on my CV. After all, I think it is not the school name but what you can do matters.
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  7. I totally relate to you! I picked Lewis based on distance+expenses when really I wish I picked Saint Marys or any other school...Lewis is a great program it was just the cheapest for me. I'm hoping I get into one of the schools I'm waitlisted at because it is my top choice. Honestly yes cost is a huge factor but no matter what program you go too you will get a job when you graduate. The job security for this profession is so high that you will pay off that debt. Unfortunately it is too late to get your acceptance to Northwestern back, I'm really hoping you get off the waitlist if that's w
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  8. Not that I am aware of. My program is in Georgia and I know they are opening things up over there prematurely because of their ignorant governor... so I really hope that wont make things spike up again.
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  9. I didn't get into my top choice school (in-state tuition, only 10 minutes from my house) and it was a huge bummer. I ended up picking an expensive school that required me to move a few hours a way over an even more expensive online program. Do I still wish that I'd gotten into the in-state school and wonder what I could have done to get in? Absolutely. Have I been unhappy or unfulfilled with my current program? Absolutely not. It ended up being such a good program and experience with a really tight-knit cohort and supportive professors. I don't love everything about the area I'm now livin
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  10. To be honest, I would be pretty happy with this kind of situation. Of course, I'd be even happier if the situation improves and we see a more "normal" arrangement, but this would much better than moving everything online. I do think we may be in a somewhat "lucky" situation as graduate students, given that our classes will be small anyway.
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  11. Hey all, I saw this article about a local MI university and their plans for college in the age of corona. The college's plan, as of now, is below. In-person laboratory classes, but limited to a small number of students. “We might have three students in a large lab where social distancing is possible, and where they can wear masks and can be tested before they come in,” Pescovitz said. Some classes moved to larger venues on campus – the university president offered an example of a class of 50 in a room that seats 250 so students can maintain safe social distance. Ballrooms in
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  12. cassidyaxx

    2021 Applicants

    Same here!
    1 point
  13. Haha yeah my Mason Fellow recommendation was intended for @spnfiim ! Sorry for the confusion, was echoing your advice...
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  14. I wouldn't call that mercenary so much as I would call it understanding the challenges and issues of the existing system. The COVID-19 crisis is going to further squeeze academia, which will likely lead to a small number of programs producing an ever more disproportionate number of TT faculty. Getting ahead of that curve is not a bad idea. @DenverSun16, I would aim to do as well as you possibly can on the GRE. Score above the 90th-95th percentile for verbal, 90th-95th on the analytical writing, and do your best on the quant section. Some programs do use it to make funding decisions, but,
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  15. One could also read the acknowledgements in works by faculty members and its graduates. Are POIs thanked for significant contributions to a work? Are POIs heaping praise upon colleagues and graduate students? Are there signs of life changes that may impact a scholar's life for years to come? How about book reviews? Are POIs appropriately professional or a bit too personal when writing about works they don't like? You could also check CVs. Do POIs serve the profession? Earn teaching awards? Present too much or just enough? Are they in a phase of their careers in which they're really
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  16. This is not a difficult decision. You should stay at your job, make it very clear to your boss you are not going to grad school, and hope like crazy they still give you the promotion (and please stop telling emoloyers you will be quitting before you are sure of it). This is NOT the time to be leaving good, steady employment for a policy degree, online or not.
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  17. I moved from the Southeast to the Northeast for graduate school, and then from the Northeast to the Pacific Northwest for my first job. The first move is more relevant - much like dippedincoffee, I scaled down significantly; I got all of my belongings into two suitcases. I agree with @dippedincoffee that buying new stuff where you go might be cheaper than shipping things. I looked into shipping my bedroom furniture (really nice stuff) from my home in the Southeast to the Northeast, but it was cheaper for me to buy an inexpensive but still good quality mattress and bed frame in the new loc
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  18. Ok, thanks for letting me know! Even though Econ 1001 was showing as full, I submitted a Registration Override Form and managed to enroll today Excited to have Prof Joseph as my prof for 1001 and 1002
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  19. As someone who had to spend the last half semester remote at HKS—you should delay. I cannot in good conscience recommend that you start a policy program remotely. The in-person educational experience is worth it. The remote version does not have the same level of engagement, and you are paying significant opportunity cost for that. It simply is not the same. Caveat: It may be worth it if you already quit your job, or if you're really ready for a transition.
    1 point
  20. nomadartist

    FRQSC 2020

    Oh well. It seems that each funding agency in Canada has a particular way of distribution, which compared to the US for instance, in many ways functions very well. However, in other ways it lets down the applicants. I hope everyone is managing to keep a healthy level of sanity and serenity these days!
    1 point
  21. Personally, if you are dead set on Causal Inference I think McGill would be the best fit. Otherwise I think UBC has plenty of research areas to pick from and I think that would also be an excellent choice
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  22. Hi, @JesusFdz What are your long-term goals? I saw elsewhere that you were thinking of going into philosophy in order to teach. I hate to be the Donny downer, but you realize that this is not the kind of thing you just go into. Teaching jobs that pay more than rent, clothing, and food are hard to come by. If you go into a PhD program, you need to accept the possibility that you never get more than an adjunct position. Adjunct pay right now is somewhere between $1,600 and $3,000 per class (from where I have seen in large metro areas/big state universities, not cities like NYC, LA
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  23. To anyone who is now afraid to post on here: Please do not be. I (and others) truly welcome your perspective, input and thoughts on this. It's ok to speculate. It's ok to talk about your fears, concerns and analysis. It's ok to re-post articles. I created this thread for this precise reason, and as long as I'm on here, I will stick up for you if you want to talk about this. Discouraging thought, speculation or the sharing of mainstream media articles on COVID-19's effects on higher ed is not healthy, and it has the added negative effect of discouraging discussion on the wider/broader topic.
    1 point
  24. Keep it. Totally valid, and research grants are always a good thing. Money begets money, so if they see that you've been awarded money before, they will be more inclined to give you more in the future.
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  25. Very common to have no published papers and in many ways, desirable. The work you produced as a M* student, hopefully, should be second rate to what you've done as a doc student, just as faculty work should trump student work. As my advisor put it: Your focus as a M* student should entirely be focused on consuming knowledge. We don't want students that as M* students felt like they knew it so well that they needed to go educating others, because ultimately you known jack shit. I think it's beneficial to have some kind of presentation(s) under your belt though, only because it helps y
    1 point
  26. To my knowledge, Columbia is still currently planning to have in-person classes in the fall. I'm sure they'll be very direct and let us know ASAP if/when they decide to change that. I've been playing around with the idea of deferring for a year, but I think I'd loose the scholarship that I got. So I think I'll stick with whatever Columbia decides to do for now.
    1 point
  27. Hi all — I haven’t followed this forum in a couple of years and I know decisions have already been made, but just popping in as a recent Tulane MA graduate (‘19) to say that the program was amazing for my needs (Additional prep for PhD programs in classical arch.) Every single member of the faculty is wonderful and it’s a supportive environment. I really couldn’t have had a better experience and I feel like the program is a hidden gem that often gets overlooked among funded US MA programs. Feel free to message me if you have any questions about the program or New Orleans. Congrats to all on yo
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  28. My university is in the epicenter, and there has been no mention of canceling the fall semester. Things may be online going into the fall as they are now, but the likelihood of straight up canceling/postponing I think is slim.
    1 point
  29. I know that for my program (Public History MA at Colorado State University), they're expecting to hold classes in the fall and the GTA position that we received are secure, along with the benefits. I've been really worrying so I was glad to get more information.
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  30. CUA is offering their Semitic courses online this summer: Syriac, Coptic. Armenian, Ethiopic, Arabic (focus on Christian Arabic literature). Princeton will continue to offer German, French, and Latin for reading exam purposes - online. At $525/course it's rather affordable.
    1 point
  31. Hi there! For my Master's I had to move cross country from California to Georgia and I did it alone. I planned it pretty carefully, with all the stops planned out and had maps in case I lost service (free maps at AAA). Personally I donated a lot of stuff because I wanted to start fresh. Sometimes buying stuff at the destination will be cheaper than shipping/renting a trailer. I fit my whole life in my small car. If I were you, I would call up UHaul and other companies to get a rate for a trailer. Then look at the cost of shipping your items and compare. I would guess shipping will be more expe
    1 point
  32. Im trying to figure this out too but I know that Berkeley, Duke, Northwestern, CUNY Grad Center, and UMass have a critical theory cluster/minor/certificate etc. I know Northwestern teaches this at the undergraduate level, but I'm not too sure about the others. CUNY schools definitely dont. If they do have a department its interdisciplinary and has faculty from comparative lit, English, philosophy, cultural/area studies, political science, etc. Those professors usually have primary interests which also intersect with critical theory and it falls in that interdisciplinary department.
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  33. YALL. UGA just offered me a full ride assistantship and 12k stipend for living expenses. I literally could get my whole masters degree for $50. 😭😭 but my dream school is Columbia. I really don’t know what to do.
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  34. Like Crucial BBQ, I am also a bit older and thus I remember 2008 all too well. In fact, I finished my undergrad degree and was looking to launch my career just as the economic crisis was solidifying. All I can tell you is, in terms of achieving your goals, EVERYTHING is harder during an economic crisis. Getting into your preferred graduate program is harder, both because there are less funding spots and because there are way more applicants (that brilliant idea you had to further your education while the job market sucks...it turns out, you're not the only person who has thought of that :).
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  35. I'm worried about the long-term economic impacts and how that will affect funding and the job market. I saw someone online suggest that we could go through another round of what happened in academia during the 2008 financial crisis. I was fairly young then, however, so I don't know much about that. I'm curious if anyone can speak to it? What sort of changes could we expect?
    1 point
  36. For undergrad yeah the M is for MIT but Michigan is unanimously (niche subfields aside) stronger in political science PhDs. It's not subjective.
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  37. I am a 2 time grad school attendee (different degrees). I am deaf in one ear and was diagnosed with severe narcolepsy some years ago, in college. I understand your feelings, because I felt the same way for YEARS. I just had to start seeing that despite the disability, we managed to graduate from school and are trying to live as best a life as possible. I have talked about that experience in my essays and how I overcome that to live my life. Being disabled and still managing to go through everyday life is an accomplishment in itself. I'm now a practicing tax lawyer and have changed
    1 point
  38. Rising MSW student this fall! I'm deaf and also doing my program 100% online. I'm a little scared to see how the professors will handle this experience. At my undergrad they had a HUGE disability office and were fantastic about providing access to online materials. I'm keeping my fingers crossed but this school seems to be very understanding. One thing that scares me is I won't be able to make any friends in my cohort since I can't call or videochat with them.
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  39. Late to this topic, but I was and will be a disabled applicant for 2021 again. It's tricky having medical disability that is so unpredictable and costly. I have noticed that most of the accessible programs/campuses are up-front about it (e.g. it does not take a great deal of work or research to find accommodation services, they have diversity programs that exist etc...) I have had the most success with being upfront about my circumstances with professors/supervisors/housing etc... The feelings of inadequacy, of "being behind" linger but I remind myself of how much I have accomplished in
    1 point
  40. Yes. I have psychiatric disabilities, and they have really held me back academically and professionally. It took me double the amount of time to finish law school-6 years instead of 3-due to taking multiple mental health leaves. However, unlike most recent law grads I ended up graduating with a job lined up that's full-time, long-term and JD required. So I did pretty well for myself in spite of it all.
    1 point
  41. My take is, dress up for classes that you are teaching, and wait and see for classes that you are attending. I think that it kind of depends on the school as to how dressy your classes are, but you should probably dress in a way that distinguishes you from your students when you are actually teaching.
    1 point
  42. ok, this may sound ridiculous, but what about clothing? as a TA, will i be expected to look semi-sharp? i went to a small undergrad-only school so i'm clueless here...
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  43. What was valuable to me: -1TB hard drive to back up to -Bookcase (you accrue a crap ton of books) -Scanner (why have a filing cabinet when you can have a digital one that takes up no space at all) -Google Docs account (20GB for $5 a year ain't bad when you can access it anywhere) -Laptop (unless you are really stationary or you need the extra power of a desktop) -Alcohol (lots of it) -Specific hardbound notebooks (I use Black 'n' Reds) individually for taking notes in seminars and notes from meeting with the boss. It helps for refering back to stuff. -Digital recorder for class -Dry e
    1 point
  44. fauxtog

    Grad. School Supplies?

    if you haven't already bought this book, it is a very handy resource, from the application process through completion. Getting What You Came For: The Smart Student's Guide to Earning an MA or PhD
    1 point
  45. filing cabinets are good. any sort of filing system. corkboard and coloured notecards. especially helpful for visually mapping out a long-term research project. a calendar of some sort. do you write in an agenda? use your computer's calendar? want something on the wall? time management will be key in your life and you'll need this. badly. external hard-drives and thumb drives. back up everything. save it on your computer and your thumb drive at all times. back it all up on the external HD once every two weeks or whenever you remember. keep updated copies of your work in two or three p
    1 point
  46. Good topic! A lot depends, of course, on what program you are going into. I agree with the file cabinet suggestion. You probably will need at least one floor-to-ceiling bookshelf for textbooks--I haven't bought a single textbook that I plan to sell, since all of my classes are directly related to what I'm going to be doing long-term. When I started last fall I didn't know what to get so I limited myself to the usual "back-to-school" stuff: binders, notebook paper, pencils (I use mechanical), erasers... Things I didn't have and ended up buying in a hurry: *Laptop (I only had a des
    1 point


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