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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/27/2020 in all areas

  1. I was actually going to recommend the same thing. For one thing: statistics may not seem useful for an English PhD, but I've seen some innovative dissertations in the past few years that make use of quantitative analysis and data mining. (If you're doing a project on, say, how a periodical changed across time, then statistical analysis may indeed be helpful. English people do tend to be math phobic, so a lot us are "blown away" by someone who can combine math with literary analysis.) And for another thing--yes, quantitative analysis is a hugely desirable skill in the nonacademic workforce
    2 points
  2. To be honest this score is pretty great. at least for me.. my scores are WAY WAY worse. I wouldn't even bother to take it again. Many schools, including Harvard and BU are waiving the GRE this year anyways because of COVID, so I would look into all of the schools you are applying and find out if it's even required, some don't want you to submit it at all, some give the option. Yale is probably waiving it indefinitely. I sure hope they all do. This test is so biased and does not really say much about someone's ability to succeed as a grad student. I would try to focus on your letters of recomme
    2 points
  3. It's still a little unclear to me why you would apply with four different projects (which will require four different SOPs). I would highly recommend working on one solid SOP that emphasizes your research questions--this is an opportunity to show profs that you can ask incisive and interesting questions. What are your research questions, out of interest? I don't think it's necessarily that important to "position yourself" -- for sure show that you are engaged with your field and you understand how your project relates to the concerns of the field, but the cultural/religious/economic/etc labels
    2 points
  4. I would split the recommender from the recommendation. Yes, I think you're right to assume this advisor doesn't know the standards of English departments. The reason they're recommending you take statistics is that it's a prerequisite for a lot of graduate programs: PhD students in political science, sociology, economics, psychology, public policy, education, history, business, and engineering all routinely take stats. Statistics are often fundamental to their methodologies, and it's often on the basis of their methodological (and thus statistical) knowledge that they gain employment afte
    2 points
  5. · A few weeks ago, I was asked to talk to first-year M.A. students about the Ph.D. application process. I prepared a list of what I figure to be key elements, and I figure it might be useful to many on GC who are preparing to go down this path as well. I'm quite certain that some of these points are purely subjective and open to discussion / debate, but having gone through the process a couple of times now, these items ring true based on my experiences and observations. ---------------- Others have surely told you about the state of the industry, so I’m just going to assume that
    1 point
  6. @hassanJD Here is the spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1yb_yciijFGEp5roVKYJ40U4eiREo3ZQTeSQkEjGMSsg/edit#gid=339976266 And here is one that updates regularly about whether programs are waiving the GRE: https://frederick-choo.weebly.com/gre-philosophy-2021-admission.html
    1 point
  7. excxn

    UChicago Harris 2021

    @joshyboy In one of the info sessions they mentioned that it's fine if just one of your professor is submitting just a few days late (I think they said 3-5), so it sounds like it should still count as Early Action.
    1 point
  8. Hi all, current ABD student at Penn State popping in. We just heard from our department head that we will be taking on new students, but that the university is shrinking our cohort size to about 5 per year. TBH, I came in with a cohort of 7, so our program has always been on the small side. All incoming students are guaranteed 5 years of funding. I also imagine preference will be given to people expressing interest in the dual-title PhD program (in WGSS, AfAm Studies, and Asian Studies), because that will help with funding. I'm dual in WGSS and History, happy to answer any questions abou
    1 point
  9. Thank you, but I wasn't trying to suggest otherwise.
    1 point
  10. wow, I completely forgot that I had commented on this thread! Glad I had notifications forwarding to email, as I'm fairly inactive here altogether. I'm now in my fourth year at program #2. I've finished a master's thesis/ degree along the way, passed my comprehensive exams, and now am now into dissertation work (how has that much time passed?!!). The process of applying to and deciding on programs seems far, far away. While I've thought of program #1 often over the years, I don't regret my decision to attend program #2. Most of what I said previously holds true, but I do now have a littl
    1 point
  11. I think you put "future planned"(F/P) if you are starting the course in January. I would check on the School's website.. I know I've seen this information somewhere before.
    1 point
  12. They average out any year where they need to take at least one course but don't use the entire year. So in your case they would probably use your two additional courses, 10 individual courses from your fourth year, and average out your entire 3rd year for the remaining credits (giving your third year average a weight of as many credits are used) So for example, if the average for your entire third year was 3.7 and you were missing 8 credits (20 total minus 2 non-degree and 10 from 4th year), then it would be calculated as a 3.7 with a weight of 8 out of 20 credits (this would obv depend o
    1 point
  13. I’m in the same boat! I was hoping that my low-ish GPA would be offset by having 200+ hours but I don’t know if they’ll count for anything this year!
    1 point
  14. The experimental physics professor seems like he would be able to write a more meaningful letter for you.
    1 point
  15. I agree fully with what is said here. No, it's not wrong to advise prospective students about the job market and what to expect (or not) on the other end. However, let people make their own decisions to attend or not -- as you did. I'd like to highlight, also, that there are other options, such as funded MA programs, as a first step and possible stopping place if you then decide not to go for a PhD, not covered here, which provide a middle ground. I'd also emphasize that UCs actually have very competitive funding packages (including for certain terminal MAs) and graduate students are unio
    1 point
  16. I mean this to be a constructive question, but I'm also a little confused so maybe you can clarify -- why are you applying with four different potential projects?
    1 point
  17. While the topics of your study are outside of my area, I will say that it's not uncommon for grad applicants to change focus from undergrad to grad. With this in mind, it would make sense that one's referees might be from different areas. We look at applications and try to judge interest and aptitude and look for how the student's aims line up with the program's goals and objectives. LORs can be one metric of this, but we also look at them for evidence of professionalism. Does it show the effort you put into your studies? Did the prof enjoy working with you? Were you timely with assignments a
    1 point
  18. ILoveEdPolicy

    UPenn 2021

    @Beezkneez08 Thank you! It actually worked out well, they were college professors whose school year was not yet started so I think they wanted to finish them before they started teaching! And it was about three weeks from full submission to acceptance!
    1 point
  19. WanYesOnly

    LOR Dilemma

    No, it wouldn't look bad if you only had one letter from the three research mentors you worked with imo. If all three of your projects are relevant to your application and future interests, then yes, talk about them. And no, don't omit a relevant project from your resume. For the last question though, I don't quite know the answer. It's better to always go with academic supervisors unless you've been out of school for a long time.
    1 point
  20. From what I've learned, there's no point changing your hook/intro, past experiences, and current experiences. These should be set in stone. The only part of your statement that differs for each school should be the last paragraph, connecting your experiences/ambitions to the specific school. I hope that eases the anxiety on writing "multiple" letters. (because you really don't!) When doing your research for schools, look at what concentration the program highlights! If they emphasize Med-SLP training, but you're interested in education, most likely their faculty's researches and clinical
    1 point
  21. Their admissions page states that they are still accepting students for Spring 2021 and that the deadline for those applications is the end of November. I imagine they won't get to any Fall applicants sooner than that. If I were you, I would ask during the required online interview for a better idea. Here's a link to a similar thread from a few years ago, where the earliest applicant to post about their decision on the thread received their admission on February 15th. Many had to wait well into March. I bet you will be one of the first to hear back, but as @Ravine55stated, they'll probab
    1 point
  22. Well... PhD and EdD cater towards 2 different communities. PhD targets those focused on research interests (including those straight from undergrad). EdD generally targets those who are professionals seeking to get a doctorate level degree. It is not that one is better than the other, but more like they look for different people. If you enjoy research, go for PhD NOW (don't waste time or career potential). If you don't know you want a doctorate, then work a bit and then you can always swing back to EdD or PhD. That being said, EdD's are generally viewed as second class doctorates by many P
    1 point
  23. polsciguy88

    Grad school

    You are unlikely to find a job regardless of what subfield you choose.
    1 point
  24. Artifex_Archer

    Grad school

    No, you shouldn't worry about that. First: More people should study Strauss for a number of reasons, very few of which have anything at all to do with whether one should 'agree' with him or not. Strauss is a very valuable resource for learning how to interrogate texts—and I use that term in the most holistic sense possible—in new ways. He wrote critically about the necessary tension between the philosopher and society, which is certainly worth reflection in an age where so many people believe they lead 'philosophic' lives—just as long as their 'philosophizing' remains in normative lockste
    1 point
  25. I want to resurrect this thread...any 2021 Ed Policy people? I'm applying for a Master's right now. Would love to connect and discuss.
    1 point
  26. To reply as a human who has a few potentially relevant experiences: I am queer. I hold an MFA, which is a terminal degree that sets one up for the potential of tenure track. I’ve done the adjunct circuit (see username). I have museum experience as well and understand the politics of that world. I am a potential applicant in upcoming cycles for an art history PhD. So, with all that in mind ..... this is my opinion. The art world doesn’t have any jobs right now. Not for me, not for you. The pandemic had caused issues in academia that have long reverberations, but so too i
    1 point
  27. Some programs will allow two samples totalling 15-25 pages, but even those usually note that they would prefer one paper of that length (or even a 15-25 page excerpt of an even longer piece).
    1 point
  28. I agree-don’t give them an easy reason to move on to the rest of the reading pile. Best to stick with the rules they laid down.
    1 point
  29. You're better off with one 15-25 page writing sample. Programs want to see that you can produce a strong, extended argument, and they want to know that you can enter the program and hit the ground running, which means writing several 15-25 pages seminar papers at the end of your first semester while managing other responsibilities.
    1 point
  30. For those who are thinking about applying: I want to offer a response to wt2020's post, from the perspective of someone similarly situated (recent PhD recipient from a top program, also had the rug yanked out from under me this job cycle). I agree with a lot of the content of the post, particularly that one's university should "pay you living wages, ensure full health insurance, provide ample time to complete the program (5-7 years), protect your rights as a laborer in the department" (though I note that graduate student workers at UCLA are indeed unionized - https://uaw2865.org/about-ou
    1 point
  31. IF YOU ARE THINKING OF APPLYING PLEASE READ I have lurked these forums for years since first thinking of attending a graduate program in art history in 2012. I finished my PhD this spring from a top-tier program and I now feel more than ever that it is imperative for me to loudly voice what is, in some ways, a cruel but honest truth about this system: A PhD in art history is a bad idea. Everything vivodito mentioned above is true. To add anecdote to fact I will say I had a tenure-track job at a decent liberal arts college revoked this summer because the department put a hiring freeze
    1 point
  32. Hi, I wanted to add a little perspective as a current PhD candidate at an ivy currently organizing to pressure my department to follow Yale and Chicago in suspending admissions for Fall 2021. The response of most programs to the disruptions presented by the pandemic has been atrocious. PhD students of all disciplines find themselves looking at what amounts to a year loss of progress towards degree--many students have had to abandon research in the US and abroad, obviously library access has been severely limited. Hiring freezes set in pretty quickly after the pandemic's outset, so the cla
    1 point
  33. Hi, I am a current student at ENMU. I will be graduating in December. CDIS program is a rigorous program. Be prepared to push yourself, especially in Swift classes. However, once you take few Swift courses you'll find your groove. Swift summer classes are RIDICULOUS, her course work is pushed into 4 weeks of instruction. She'll allow a few weeks to take "outcome exams". The program has implemented "outcome exams" which are mini quizzes that align with KASA for each course. Basically, you can have an A in the course and you fail all outcomes at finals, you'll fail the course; o
    1 point
  34. I got into 5 of 7 schools and wait listed to the other 2 with a 3.4 in the major so I actually think that's a pretty good GPA or at least good enough to get you into a decent amount of schools. I have a 3.6 overall but also had a ton of experiences and was a double major. But I really wouldn't beat yourself up over a 3.4...I don't know your chances for that particular school but don't lose hope on being removed from the waitlist yet. A lot of people are deferring admission because of covid which'll open up seats. I was accepted off the waitlist for 2 of my schools, SXU took me off a few weeks
    1 point
  35. An update - I've been waitlisted at University of South Carolina and Idaho State. I've been accepted to Western Kentucky and Baylor. I still haven't heard anything from University of Montana and NOVA. I think I'm going to withdraw my application from NOVA. Has anyone been accepted to Baylor or WKU and plan on attending?
    1 point
  36. @speechie264 I know I've been accepted elsewhere so it's not the stress of going to grad school! It's my last in state option and they have a bilingual program so I'm just anxious haha
    1 point
  37. Hi everyone, i received my accepted to NAU back on Jan 30 and so did a friend of mine ,, they might be waiting for people to decline before the email again?
    1 point
  38. Private Universities are more likely to offer similar funding to all applicants. As a general rule of thumb, the top 50 schools (per USNews) should guarantee funding. I think there is only one in the top 50 in where funding isn't offered to all applicants and 2-3 that don't guarantee funding for all years. Some alternate the number of years of guaranteed funding. I'd be more than happy to share what I know via PM if you want to talk. There are a considerable amount of schools outside the top 50 which do offer guaranteed funding, have a good placement record and do very well in certain special
    1 point
  39. I'd like to offer a different perspective. I was denied admission to a school where 3 recommenders had earned their Ph.D from, accepted into a school where 1 recommender earned their Ph.D degree from, and accepted into two schools where my recommenders had no connections to. I do think that if you have similar interests as your recommenders and you're applying to a similar field that it might be helpful in terms of navigating how well you'd fit in.
    1 point
  40. Hello I am new here and just recently heard about this forum but I would just like for someone to give me an idea of where I am at and what I should consider. Applying to: Political Science (with emphasis in PT) PhD - UCSD, UCSB, UCLA, UMichigan, Duke, NYU, CUNY, with a desire for a future in academia. Undergraduate Institution: Top ten US school, "Public Ivy" Undergraduate GPA: 3.0 cumulative, 3.45 major, 3.7 last two years Undergraduate Major: Political Science with a concentration in Political Theory (and a minor in Philosophy) GRE: 165V/161Q/5.5AWA - pretty ha
    -1 points


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