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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/26/2020 in Blog Comments

  1. Hello, I've never joined an online forum/community like this but I am looking for something, anything that will help me right now. This blog post stood out to me because I also struggle with feelings of inadequacy throughout my undergrad and graduate school experience. It always feels like my peers are one step ahead of me. I completed my masters degree and after working for a year started applying to doctorate programs. I am completely crushed to say I did not get accepted into any programs and feel lost for lack of a better word. Should I give up? Are my aspirations in research meaningless?
    3 points
  2. I just finished my first semester of graduate school at an Ivy League university. I feel a constant sense of inadequacy, especially because I come from a more unusual academic background than my Master's major. Anyway -- wish I could offer some sort of encouragement or insight, but I am in this perpetual cycle of inadequate feelings. Regardless, this has taught me a lot about mental resilience and to make-up for any weaknesses or bumps in the road. I'm trying to learn from this experience, but I am interested in anyone else's insight. Thanks for the posts!
    2 points
  3. tatobe

    Final Response & Decision

    I am so happy that you did! Thank you SO much for sharing this with me. I am doing a waiting game right now and I am totally freaked out. I have a lot of positives going for me, but it also makes me extremely nervous to wait like this. I mean it's like either A) You are getting rejected or B ) You are getting accepted. There's no in between. I honestly feel sick to my stomach about all of this process. But I know that what will be will be. I'd just like to know what direction it's going. Hey, thank you so much for your post. It was encouraging!
    1 point
  4. I was always very curious and got bored anything which had the tiniest bit of monotonicity. Further, the life of an academic seemed amazing as each day they learn something new and chase after the unknown... Thus, this life seemed a perfect fit for me and I decided to pursue this dream....
    1 point
  5. Hi! I just joined GradCafe and this was the message I needed to see. I'm finishing up my last year of my master's degree in English and have no publications yet. My GPA isn't that great and I'm taking my tests in the spring. I'm not applying to school till Fall 2020, but I'm so nervous. The worst thing they can tell us is no, right? And we can always keep trying. I'm glad that I'm not the only one that doesn't feel as confident in their current marketability to their programs.
    1 point
  6. Hi @sendmeadvice! Thanks for posting this, because I hadn't realized that my post may be taken in that way! My intention wasn't to minimize the accomplishments of people with more experience. It was meant to say that if you don't have that experience but have still given it your all, that shouldn't stop you from applying. We of course will be compared to people who are better and more accomplished than us, and learning to accept that is a part of life. I totally see your point about the contextualization, and I hadn't intended to imply that someone with years of experience will be he
    1 point
  7. Hi @ResilientDreams, First, I really admire the advice that you give on GradCafe, and you seem to have a great application. However, there is something about the message that I am getting from the blog post that is not sitting well with me, and I want to push back against. The idea that I am getting from this is that "my" achievements will be contextualized. In saying this, there is an implicit suggest that the person who has 10+ years of work experience doesn't deserve the same benefit-of-the-doubt perhaps in regards to GPA or whatever. It matters because it is an unhealthy way of
    1 point
  8. Apply, apply, apply. There are life equivalents for these kinds of formal goals, and places to put them, like on this blog. I'm in the same situation. But through hard work I've found alternate applications beside money and ambition to fill my emotional purgatory. Good or Bad I can move forward in life without the emotional guilt trip of completing something. To even say you've gone this far to pursue your education is an achievement in itself. All the best to you moving forward. May the road to your success be free of roadblocks.
    1 point
  9. 2 years sounds great and not at all hopeless. There is definitely time to turn things around, though you will have to approach this, I think, with a whole new attitude and really step up advocating for yourself. 1) It's a really good sign that your advisor recognizes that you need to specialize. I would request scheduling a meeting with her in the near future for a more serious sit-down (rather than just a drop-in) about your remaining time in the program, and future direction. Mention (tactfully) your frustrations, but also how you plan to remedy this. Bring up the need to specialize agai
    1 point
  10. I'm finishing my 4th year of grad school too I have heard many other people give me similar advice when I started my PhD. That is, they advised me to make sure I am not just a "technician". In my field, that would be someone who writes code to analyze data or collects data from the telescope. However, I think it is much easier said than done for a PhD student to be 100% independent researchers that come up with our own ideas etc. I'm nearing the end of PhD year 2 now and most of what I've done is technician type work. From observing my colleagues, I would say that the majority of us are
    1 point
  11. Uh, guys, my post above was a joke. While I don't think the GRE is completely without merit (I've even defended it before), I don't think that someone's performance on one test on one given day can say much about a person's potential academic or professional performance--often in an excruciatingly specialized field--for years to come. I scored well on the GRE verbal because I have a memory for and genuine interest in vocabulary; I wouldn't say that my vocabulary knowledge makes me smarter, more capable, or more ambitious than my competition. Quite honestly my vocab skills won't help me
    1 point
  12. All of your sources are older than 5 years old. I want newer proof please.
    1 point
  13. Oh no, please let it be true--I scored in the 93rd percentile for verbal; I guess that means grad school will be a breeze for me! And how can I not get in? After all, my GRE verbal score is pretty damn good. What's that you say? The GRE doesn't guarantee admission, and if I matriculate, I still have to show up, make an effort, study, read, contribute, participate, and do in-depth work both inside and outside of the classroom? But...but...I did well on one section of one very specific test. Dream killer!
    1 point
  14. You seem to be ignoring the fact that the effectiveness of said test to measure ones ability in a graduate program drops off significantly at anything over 70th percentile. I would venture to guess that the difference between someone who scores 70th percentile on verbal and 90th percentile on verbal is negligible at best. I say that as someone who scored over 90th percentile on verbal.
    1 point


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