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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/29/2020 in all areas

  1. 15 points
    karamazov

    2020 Acceptances

    Well, I just received an offer from UNC off their waitlist. I am now officially going to have a heart attack.
  2. 12 points
    jasbee

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    Good luck to everyone! I was super impatient to hear back (hence making that whole chart thing) and was planning on staying up until GRFP results were posted, but we had to go to the vet to put my family's 14 year-old chocolate lab down this morning and I'm pretty emotionally/physically exhausted (she lived a long, full, happy life and we knew it was going to happen soon-ish). Here's to hoping the results come out super early and the universe decides to give me some good news tonight...
  3. 10 points
    platonetsocrate

    Decisions 2020 (Ph.D.)

    Accepted University of Michigan! Declined: Marquette, Stony Brook, Villanova, Boston University, Fordham Took myself off the waitlist: DePaul, UT Austin, Emory (and, of course, rejected far, far more places than these)
  4. 10 points
    Kantattheairport

    Decisions 2020 (Ph.D.)

    Oh whoops, already commented this on another thread, but - corona permitting, I'll be heading to Madison, Wisconsin. And just a quick note for applicants who have either been shut out or are still unsure they'll have a positive decision to make this cycle: everybody's position is different, of course, but this was the third year of applying to schools for me. Thirty-eight other applications before this one finally clicked. So don't get disheartened too soon! ❤️
  5. 9 points
    Dogfish Head

    2020 Decisions

    I accepted Syracuse's offer yesterday! OSU is not taking anyone off their waitlist this year, and I got the official "no" from Virginia on Monday. Is anyone else heading to Syracuse in the Fall? If so, feel free to reach out to me! I won't be checking this site as much now that my application cycle is over, but good luck to everyone else who is still waiting to hear definitive news or who still choosing between programs!
  6. 8 points
    MundaneSoul

    2020 Acceptances

    I’m so excited to say that I officially accepted my offer at University of Oregon today! It felt so weird to submit the acceptance letter; I stared at the screen for like ten minutes before I finally clicked send. It’s such a good fit for me, though, and I think I’m going to absolutely love it there. The faculty and students that I got to chat with were all wonderful. I can’t believe this is finally happening! Thanks to everyone here for all your advice and kindness!
  7. 8 points
    3st3rb

    NDSEG 2019-2020

    Well if it gives any of you a nice giggle today, I was looking through the documents I submitted and realized that I legit left "Sometime next decade" on there for NDSEG. LOL
  8. 8 points
    SFS

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    Buckle your seatbelts everyone...
  9. 7 points
    Duns Eith

    Philosophy PhD Profiles

    Wouldn't it be better to just have a google form or an open spreadsheet? I'd rather not provide all that information (some of which might be sensitive) associated with my username here. I'm not opposed to making this information available. I'm opposed to providing it in this manner (a way that does not promote useful data organization for analysis;a way that may reduce significantly one's anonymity). Make only a few fields required for submission.
  10. 7 points
    letssee

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    Lol. I’m trying to limit myself to checking every half hour. That and binge watching netflix will hopefully help, but my heart rate is definitely up! I have a lab meeting early tomorrow morning and I would die if I could tell my advisor and labmates I got it.
  11. 7 points
    I got accepted to Harvard PhD in Population Health Science (epidemiology) today after getting waitlisted for about 2 months! Full funding with stipend too! I guess waitlists do move and I'm so happy I didn't completely lose hope earlier.
  12. 6 points
    tinymica

    2020 Applicants

    I can't sleep thinking about my choices! I'd like to be on the same coast as my family, but I have to sacrifice some things I want to do that. If I went the other way, I'd get those things but I'd have to give up being closer to family and also my relationship. Shit's tough
  13. 6 points
    I was poking around on Reddit last night and came across this post from a philosophy professor who is also an interim DGS. Based on the user history of the OP, it seems legitimate. I hope it is helpful to applicants of the current cycle.
  14. 6 points
    c.bee94

    2020 Canadian SLP Thread

    Hey all, I somehow had crazy luck and ended up getting accepted everywhere I applied. Just wanted to say that I will be declining Western and most likely McMaster as well, so for anyone on those waitlists, a spot should open up As soon as I'm a bit more sure of my decision I'll post on the declining offers thread with more info for anyone who is waiting for spots to open up. Sending you all good vibes! ❤️
  15. 6 points
    Hi everyone, please post here if you are declining an offer or moving off a waitlist to give others a better idea of where they stand! Thanks!!
  16. 6 points
    PolPhil

    Paying Professors for Help / Feedback

    I don't know for sure, but I've never heard of this practice within philosophy. Sounds like the kind of thing upon which philosophers would frown...
  17. 6 points
    econeconecon

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    Me: I need to go to sleep Also me: Maybe I should reread my statement of purpose and research proposal
  18. 6 points
    gooniesneversaydie

    2020 Applicants

    My heart. I'm sending you all the good vibes I possibly can that it borders on being creepy. Take time to heal. I will say this from my own experience: At 22 I had to drop out of undergrad. Cut to me at 29, sitting on my living room floor sobbing, holding a rejection letter from a local state school I tried to get into to restart my education. In that moment I thought I was completely f'ed and would never achieve my dream. After my sob-fest, I reevaluated and called the school asking how to improve my application - started cc 3 months later - graduated at a better state school 3 years after that. Last year, I got into a bomb PhD program, but the move didn't work out. I thought I was completely f'ed again because I had to walk away from my one chance. But, I reevaluated again, redid my personal statement and applied to even more schools. I've been lucky again to get into one PhD program, and one that suits my personality/lifestyle better than the one from last year. What I mean to say in all this rambling, is that if this is truly the path you want, don't give up. If it's not going to be financially/mentally/spiritually harmful to you to do this again next year then go for it. Reevaluate your materials and see if something needs improving. You can only control what you have in front of you. And I'm sure you've learned many lessons this time around that next year might be more manageable (also, you'll know not to apply to BU, so there's that!). I wish you the very best and hope you know that it'll work out how it's supposed to in the end, even if the journey takes longer than you originally hoped. You're not alone!
  19. 6 points
    GoldHippie

    2020 Applicants

    Well team, just got that sweet sweet rejection email from BU. If this rejection had come a couple of weeks ago, I would have been sad, but determined to reapply to programs next year... but now, with all of the uncertainty and confusion surrounding the virus, I'm not sure if I stand a chance. Of course, there is nothing we can say right now that might apply by this time next year. I just wish I could give myself any reassuring words for next year's application season. That being said, if you have any (reassuring words, that is) I'd sure be happy to hear 'em! It is a small consolation to get to hear the voices of those of you who did get into these schools. The most wonderful thing about this kind of space, to me, is that we're all in this together. It makes it much easier for me to root for you and wish you the absolute best. As for me, I've got a nice bottle of Rosé and an earl grey mousse cake to comfort me tonight. Everybody stay safe and do something that makes you feel good today!
  20. 6 points
    MellieAnne

    Canada MSW 2020

    I got invited to the MSW 2 year program at UofT! I already paid my admission deposit. I've been waiting for this for 3 years! I was wait-listed 2 years ago and since then I have acquired my SSW diploma, 1 year experience as an addictions counsellor and 2 years experience as a crisis responder for Kids Help Phone. I outlined this new experience in my application. I originally was pessimistic about the process since my CGPA for my BA is 2.8. My last year GPA (all senior courses) is 3.4. Therefore, to those who are worried about your marks and eligibility...yes it can affect your chance of getting in but not if you have some research , volunteer and work experience. I also included some personal information about myself in my written statement. I mentioned how I have lived experience with depression and anxiety which is how I can relate to my clients. Hopefully this can give some type of ease to those that did not receive perfect grades. Good luck to everyone else.
  21. 6 points
    Kantattheairport

    2020 Acceptance Thread

    Not sure if we have a decisions thread this year (?) but I've accepted my offer at UW-Madison.
  22. 6 points
    Sigaba

    History PhD to Consulting

    I work as an analyst at a "boutique" engineering consultancy that's a big fish in a medium - sized but important pond in an obscure industry. I am a generalist on a ten person team of specialists. I would recommend that graduate students in history who want to work in consulting do their outside fields in any of the following. Project management -- often, a project deliverable evolves from the time a firm gets the job, to the project kick off meeting, and as events unfold. And also, you will often have <x hours to perform tasks that nominally need 3x hours. Technical writing -- the best, clearest, wittiest, writing you've done in the Ivory Tower can get blank stares, glares, and "huh"s from very smart people. Conversely, what may strike you as repetitive, simplistic writing is exactly what is needed. (Some of the best sentences written in your reports will be crafted using copy and paste. Passive verbal constructions will be used by you. Cringe worthy typos will often not mattress.) Data analysis --clients and stakeholders increasingly want to talk about "big data" without understanding (or caring) that many forms of consulting are both art and science. ArcGIS - or other software platforms that support the visual presentation of data If you're going to work with non humanities types, you might profit from studying the cultural sensibilities of the dominant profession, especially if they're engineers. If inclusion, social justice, and life/work balance are very important to you, you will want to do your research on potential employers very carefully. There's a generational divide in today's work place that employers are still trying to figure out. Some older firms led by (mostly) men who have worked their entire careers at one place don't understand the sensibilities of younger employees. You will want to learn how to "pick your battles" or risk finding yourself on a career path with a lower ceiling. (Or so I've heard.) You will want to learn about opportunities for stock ownership. You will want to figure out ways to get questions answered about pay, benefits, and promotions with subtly and tact. (Qualified candidates have talked themselves out of job opportunities by asking questions with a tone of entitlement.) At a consultancy you may have to "learn by doing," to roll with the punches, to take kicks to the head, and to drink extra strong cups of STFU in ways that are more challenging than the Ivory Tower. Ultimately, working at a consultancy is about generating revenue by producing deliverables on time and under budget that exceed client's expectations (if not your own.) Sometimes that means working sixty hours but billing only forty for months at a time. Sometimes, that means supporting a project approach that, while ethical, is uncomfortable. (As an example, audits and projects centered around advanced technology can lead to recommendations that cost people their jobs.) The upside is that you can end up on a team with exceptionally smart and funny people with very kind souls. (And, alas, some butt heads.) You can find yourself doing policy-related work that checks a lot of boxes on your list of personal and political beliefs. And also, you can have a degree of intellectual and psychological distance from your work at a consultancy that's more sustainable than the work you do in the Ivory Tower. In the event you want to do consulting that relies heavily on the historians' skill set, point set your Linkedin account to get the appropriate alerts. Job descriptions can provide clues as to out what skills you can develop as a graduate student.
  23. 6 points
    foreigncorrespondent

    2020 Acceptances

    I got through Cambridge, English for a PhD, with the Gates scholarship! So excited for what comes next.
  24. 5 points
    curie2020

    NDSEG 2019-2020

    Nice username @whatdothedatesmean
  25. 5 points
    Slpqwe

    2020 Canadian SLP Thread

    Hi Everyone, The McGill undergraduate association held an online panel of first year S-LP students from a bunch of schools in Canada. If someone needs help with a decision, they gave a lot of useful information in this interview. I believe the students said they would put their contact info in the comments if anyone wants to contact them directly. Just thought I would share! https://www.facebook.com/1904339623185735/posts/2735162903436732/
  26. 5 points
    gooniesneversaydie

    2020 Applicants

    So, I think I'm going to officially accept my PhD offer soon. At this point, best case scenario with BU is that I get accepted to their MA program, but if I'm not willing to go into further debt for BC, I'm sure as hell not going to for BU - especially after this aggressive silence. I'm officially over waiting for them. While I'd like to have the option of my WL accepting me, I'm not really sure I'd take them over this offer, even though it would mean I wouldn't have to move. The prospect of finally committing has me anxious af. Last year was such a disaster that I'm afraid something is going to go wrong again. However, moving 2 hours away as opposed to 47 hours away should be exceedingly less stressful. *knock on wood* *knock on so much wood* My cats are going to be super pissed.
  27. 5 points
    kolyagogolova

    2020 Acceptances

    Me too 😀 I'm glad you're in!
  28. 5 points
    I ended up committing to University of Washington. Anyone else heard from or is going there?
  29. 5 points
    HootyHoo

    Decisions 2020 (Ph.D.)

    Accepted: Boston University! ^^ Declined: Duquesne, Stony Brook, Boston College, Fordham And took myself off the waitlist at Villanova. Excited to hear about where everyone ends up!
  30. 5 points
    tulipz

    2020 Canadian SLP Thread

    Congratulations everyone and good luck to those on waitlists!! I was accepted at U of T and Western I'll be declining my offer at Western and Alberta. I'm going to be deciding between Toronto and McGill - does anyone have any opinions on the programs (like for you personally, what would be your pros and cons?)
  31. 5 points
    Some background: I came to Canada as an international student and did my undergrad at SFU. Considering Canada’s favorable immigration processes and the fact that I had already stayed here for 4 years, I decided that it would be better to choose a Canadian school of any of my other options. From the options before me, I wanted a program that was both academic and professional in its tint. I wasn’t convinced that I wanted to spend more time in academia, but wanted to keep the option open. While deciding b/w the schools, the only real contenders for me were Munk, LSE, and UOttawa. I said no to LSE but because I wanted a 2 year degree experience over the 1 year offered by the school. Plus I knew that immigration would be an issue in London. If I was going to spend money and time on a degree I wanted to do it right and not rush through it for the sake of having a diploma in hand. The two year experience provides ample time to be involved in a host of different activities, network, take more courses and really take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. UOttawa, while cheaper and with funding, was out for me because as an international student, I knew that government was never going to be my first entry point into the professional world. But besides that, Toronto has opportunities, life, and a network that Ottawa cannot match….especially if you want to keep your employment options flexible. It is for this same reason that I did not bother applying to NPSIA either. I don’t think the program is oriented towards sufficiently attracting international students (period), let alone high caliber international students. Munk Upsides: - The program does attract some very smart students with an array of different background and experiences (e.g. global health, neuro science, Polis ci, IR, engineering etc.). In this sense I think it provides students with exposure to how different subject areas mesh together in policy arenas. In addition, it meant the intellectual environment was quite diverse as well, rather than just being saturated by poli sci people. - Considering the school has only been around since 2011, in such a short period of time, it has been able to establish itself quite well. Munk alumni are recognized and sought after various professional environment from consulting, health policy, government (federal and provincial), international institutions etc. In this sense, the alumni network is quite wide and varied. - The simple fact that it is located in Toronto and associated with UofT speaks for itself. On top of that, UofT considers Munk as one of its star schools/programs, so that exposure upward trajectory for the school will only continue. - The program and courses are designed in such a way that it forces you to go outside your comfort zone. I initially started as a global security buff but through the Munk courses and other opportunities, I was able to dabble with other global affairs areas and topics such as risk, money laundering, global tax policy, global markets etc. When I first joined Munk, I wasn’t particularly looking forward to this, but It has turned out to be a blessing. Security was an area I already knew, but my exposure to these other subjects provided a more comprehensive understanding of global affairs. - At the same time students are given ample opportunity to customize their courses in year 2 and focus on whichever areas they would like to. - The Munk Fellows, Board of Directors and other individuals affiliated with the school are a boon in terms of networking. They are well connected and but underutilized by the student body. - Munk does have a variety of events and conferences that take place throughout the year. Due to its location in Toronto and association with UofT (and the Rotman school’s MBA, UofT Law etc.), the school gets some real top notch speakers. - Building on the previous point, the school allows you to take courses with the law, MBA, environmental studies, health policy, and other well established UofT depts. - The school also has some really good global exchange programs that continue to grow and develop. - The school is associated with some great thinkers and leaders. Stephen Toope was our previous head (now the VC of Cambridge University in the UK) and now Michael Sabia’s name, experience, and reputation speaks for itself. - The Munk Internship program has grown and expanded since I attended in 2015. While I obtained my own internship independently (I was a threat intelligence analyst with Scotiabank; political risk), I have since tried fostering stronger ties b/w the internship and the school. Other alumni have done similar things and the internship program continues to grow. Students go everywhere from the private sector, govt, to international organizations. The reach is pretty wide. - Besides internships, the school offers ample paid research opportunities on a variety of interesting topics, along with international experiences (conferences, trips etc.). - I think the capstone component is brilliant. My team did ours with Export Development Canada, looking at risk and opportunities associated with Canadian companies trying enter into the Chinese markets for renewable energy (waste water treatment, solar, wind, nuclear) and transportation (shipping, aviation, auto, trains). We had the opportunity to work closely with an EDC mentor, produce a report, and present our findings to the EDC chief economist in Ottawa. While applying for jobs and in interviews, hiring managers loved to hear about this kind of work experience and I did not shy away from sharing the report we published (as an example of the type of work conducted by Munk students). - The program attracts many international students from different background, which enriches the insights and experiences you have throughout your 2 years. - One of the strongest components for me is the Munk Community. The program is designed in such a way that you are forced to jump head first into work and spend copious amounts of time with fellow classmates. In terms of program design, whether by purpose or pure coincidence, Munk has created a very tight knit and deep community. I have noticed cohort after cohort, these relationships endure well after people graduate. I myself spend most of my time with Munk alumni who graduated before me, in my year, and after me…and continue to interact with new students and alumni. These people truly are smart and ambitious. Im not sure whether to credit Munk (the institution) with this observation though. - I think the recent integration b/w the public policy program at UofT (top notch) and the MGA is also a good strategic step to pool resources and create a comprehensive high quality institution. - Lastly the ability to obtain a MGA/JD, MGA/MBA, or MGA with other degrees in 3 years (just 1 extra year for 2 degrees) is a big plus. Largely because these other programs are also world class in terms of their reputation, quality of education, and networking opportunities. Munk Downsides: - Now this is pretty obvious. Tuition at Munk is very high + cost of living in Toronto is also obviously more expensive in Ottawa or Waterloo etc. I reached out to the school and they have assured me that they have been and will continue to try raising money in order to provide more financial aid to students. I personally think the tuition is very high, but I do have to acknowledge that the UofT affiliation, Munk name brand, and networks are all substantial. At the same time, the school needs to do a lot more in terms of offering financial aid to smart students who would find it hard to attend the school. While everyone at the school was very friendly generally, I did notice certain cliques with some student groups who obviously came from wealth. While this isn’t bad, id hate to have Munk become a program for those who can afford it. I’d personally like smart students from a variety of socio-economic background represented. It is very apparent that Munk is trying to brand itself as an “elite” program and looking to compete with US schools. I just worry often, that this should occur at the expense of making it less accessible to the lower rungs of society. - I will admit that the cost of tuition is my biggest gripe with the program. They want to compete with the Oxfords, Cambridges and Ivies without currently being able offer the same level of financial aid. And while the quality of education is good, with stellar faculty, the quality of education still has miles to improve to be world leading. - Building on the previous point, I think that those who do best at Munk are generally people who are independent, entrepreneurial, and go getters. The program doesn’t have streams that are as specific or as well defined as NPSIA (from what I have noticed on their site) for example (though it does still have streams), but it will still offer students the opportunities to build their experience out of Munk. For example I made my degree about risk and risk governance, though that is not an “official stream”. Other have focused on global health, climate policy, migration, development and designed their degree to focus on professional areas that range beyond what the school has classified as official streams. So if you are looking for a well-structured, highly organized, and efficient program with easy A to B to C degree path/experience, I would think about it. And that ultimately boils down to the type of student you are. Some prefer structure and organization, while others prefer flexibility and adaptation. There are no right answers, merely preferences. - The school is still relatively new (less than 10-12 years old) and as such, there are still growing pains. First year courses (like statistics) are being changed based on student feedback, in order to account for and combat weaknesses. The program structure has also changed slightly since I first started. There are more streams, courses, and opportunities being offered, even since 2017. These changes can sometimes seem a bit haphazard and disorienting. You definitely do get the feeling that the program is still trying to find its place and establish its identity. - I think that the admin needs to do a much better job with the program’s post-Munk career help (considering the amount students pay). For example, all of the private sector interviews and opportunities I was able to leverage, occurred by tapping into the rich Munk alumni network. While it’s great that Munk alumni are eager to help out, admittedly, Munk’s career center did little for me while I was looking for work. This point builds on my previous statement about the program paying dividends for people who are go getters and entrepreneurial. The opportunities are there, but you have to work hard and hunt for them. At this point you have to ask about what you are paying for. The Munk alumni and networks are valuable, but you will still need to put the work in. But the rewards are potentially very very high, as are the risks. - While the program has produced alumni in many different sectors (e.g. Climate risk in finance, political risk, provincial govt, fed govt, defense, consulting, intl institutions etc.), I do think the school needs to do more when it comes to building its practice in the humanitarian field. - It is important to note that if you have a poli sci or IR background, many courses in Year 1 will be a bit of a repeat in some areas. For example, Global security does start off with the basics of the security field, but then goes on to delve deeper. So basically your covering intl security knowledge that would span from a Year 1 undergrad course all the way to Year 4 (and higher) in the span of a few months. (Though I will note that the security prof, Jon Lindsay, is stellar and very well established; check-out his profile for yourself). At the same time, the first year mandatory courses will also expose you to global affairs topics you’ve never touched. This is an absolute positive. - The school, however, does offer many different career development workshops, specifically designed for Munk students: talks, resume writing, interviews & networking etc. I think that its good that the school is able to offer tailor made workshops for perspective global affairs professionals, but in general, I think the quality of the workshops need to improve. At least that was my feeling in 2015/16. It may have changed drastically since then. - While I think the program is doing very well and has accomplished a great deal over a short period of time to set itself up for success, I sometimes worry that its administrators are faultily trying to imbue an inflated sense of self-worth. The program is good, has accomplished a great deal, but has miles to go in order to compete with the best of the best. I think this is a double edged sword. If not done properly it can lead to ignorance and a focus away from students and the programs as a main focus of the degree. However, it is very encouraging to also hear that they have their sites set at competing with the best of the US and global schools, beyond Canada. Either way, they have miles to go before they get there. All in all, these are my thoughts. Ultimately, Munk was the best decision for me because I wanted career flexibility outside of government, along with the scope to go global. Munk students work everywhere. That being said, if you are hell bent govt and Ottawa, maybe one of the other programs might be better, especially if you are sure this is what you want. I have tried to provide the most objective and balanced opinion on the program. If you have any further specific questions, do let me know.
  32. 5 points
    strongkleeneevalscheme

    2020 Rejection Thread

    Finally got my Berkeley rejection. I apparently made it into 'the last round' of whatever it was that took them so long. That was more of a consolation than I would have expected.
  33. 5 points
    onerepublic96

    2020 Applicants

    Thank you! Oh there is definitely relief. Now I can actively focus on planning my next moves for reapplication instead of being stuck in a horrid limbo of ‘will they or won’t they?’ whilst overthinking every possible aspect of my app. As ugly as this shutout feeling is, I’m actually not as sad as I thought I would be. Definitely feeling that fresh start blank slate vibe right now and I like it.
  34. 5 points
    Verticordia

    2020 Applicants

    Emerging from my long career of lurking to verify that applying to BU is absolutely the worst. Last cycle, I didn’t hear from anything them until April 26th(!), and it was only an acceptance to their irresponsibly underfunded MA program. If you haven’t heard anything back from them yet, it’s safe to assume they’re playing the same game this year.
  35. 5 points
    JKMSW

    Canada MSW 2020

    Omg congrats everyone!!! I got in too.. This is amazing!
  36. 5 points
    AyeshaH

    Canada MSW 2020

    I also got accepted into UofT's 2 year program!!!!!! Congrats to everyone who was accepted and for those who didn't-keep on trying! This was my second time applying!
  37. 5 points
    histori041512

    Choosing

    Haven't been to NYU but unless you have $60,000 to spend right now, you are better off taking the full ride and then redirecting your specialization back to your goals once you get into a PhD program. Don't go into so much debt when the job market is the way it is now. I am going straight into a PhD program but I applied for an area of study that wasn't a main focus in my undergrad research.
  38. 5 points
    AuDie3

    Audiology Applicants 2020

    HI! I acknowledge how you mention you have no intention of coming off as negative, however, posting on a forum of aspiring audiologists with nothing but negative thoughts on the field is very much so negative. First off, I have also shadowed several audiologists in several different settings, including ENT. They have all had great relationships with their ENT doctor and enjoy the setting that they are in. Obviously, hearing aids are a big part of the field since we are dealing with patients with hearing loss. While private practice is big on selling, I believe the audiologists I shadow have no problem selling hearing aids because the patients they are seeing are interested in buying them. Many people expect to purchase hearing aids as their hearing deteriorates so of course selling is a big factor of audiology. Also, even though private practice mainly deals with HAs, it is so much more than that. They build relationships with their clients and visit with them regularly. Developing hearing loss can be an emotional burden for people, therefore, counseling and mentorship is also the role an audiologist must take on. While we do have different experiences while shadowing, I think it would be silly for both us to not consider the pros and cons of audiology. It seems I have had more pros while you cons, but I know the cons are there and at the end of the day, I still want to pursue audiology. I know of several audiologists in my area who started out making around 75k their first year. The salary truly depends on your location and setting. The money is out there, you might need to relocate, but it's there. Plus I have seen such a big range in salary, it is hard to say what one will be making starting off. While salary is a big factor, it should not be the only factor. The flexibility, hours, and clientele are a few things that attracted me to the field. Most importantly, the service I provide will be meaningful to my clients. The look on the face of a client when they put their hearing aids on for the first time will be valuable in itself. Not to mention the camaraderie within the field. You even said it yourself that you have a close relationship with your audiologist, somewhere along the line they have taken the time to build a relationship with you and it has impacted you. Therefore, at the end of the day, it's less about the salary and more about how I am serving others. I have a feeling that is how most people pursuing audiology feel. We are aware of the cons but we have decided the pros make it worth it. Thank you for your opinion. I wish you the best of luck in the career you decide to pursue.
  39. 4 points
    o0livia

    2020 Applicants

    I've been on the Berkeley waitlist but last night I got an email saying that they couldn't offer me a spot! I was a bit surprised considering how early it is and I didn't think everyone would've responded by now. I was told, also, that I was first on the waitlist, and the faculty encouraged me to assume that I was in, so it was obviously pretty disheartening to get that email. I think I'd been banking on Berkeley a bit too much because I'm not that interested in the other choices I have. Anyway, feeling a bit crushed over here.
  40. 4 points
    First of all, congratulations on getting into a PhD program! I tend to focus on the positives before the doom and gloom. Getting into any program anywhere for a PhD in political science is an accomplishment, and if it's at a large midwestern state university polisci department as you've mentioned here and elsewhere, it might not be a top 10 program, but it cannot be a bad school. Full stop. As far as jobs are concerned.. People on here and PSR seem to think that working at a smaller or lower tier school (ie a "no-name college in the middle of nowhere") is a fate worse than death. Personally, I graduated from undergrad and started my master's degree during the last recession and most of my friends who took a crack at academia and were graduating around then with PhD's weren't getting jobs at all, or were stuck in postdoc purgatory for many years. A few of my friends ended up in the private sector and two even went to permanent faculty positions at junior/community colleges in California, where the pay and resources are surprisingly good for the state community college system (check out Santa Barbara City College if you don't believe me - SBCC has the campus, faculty and resources of a major state university, and in fact, was the original UCSB campus before UCSB moved to Goleta). Based on the clues you've left us so far, I'm guessing you got into somewhere like Nebraska, Kansas or Mizzou; these are the only large state universities in the midwest with polisci programs that aren't at least T50 that I can think of off the top of my head. You might also be referring to Western Michigan or Northern/Southern Illinois. At the risk of sounding cliche, these are all decent schools and there are some great things about each of these institutions. The bottom line is this: if you are aiming to get a tenure track (TT) job at an R1/T20 department, you should go to an R1/T20 program for your PhD. Is it possible you'll get there after going to Western Michigan or SIU? Yes absolutely it's possible, but it won't be easy. It's really important to go into a PhD (at any school) with a realistic mindset and the benefit of all the advice and experiences of your peers and predecessors. Even the ivies and the T10 produce graduates who go to small schools, perpetual postdocs, or are unemployed for the first few years. You need to realize, expect, and be at peace with the prospect of a few years of postdocs, adjunct teaching positions, and/or teaching at a lower tier university or community college. It could be that you do this for a few years until you get the TT job of your dreams, or, equally as likely, it could be that you do this for your entire career and you never end up at Harvard or Cal. Either way, academia is brutal, and the political science job market is never going to be booming. Do not go into this field to make a lot of money, get famous or have prestige, because the odds are against it.
  41. 4 points
    SSSLLLPPP

    2020 Canadian SLP Thread

    So excited! After 3 years of applying and receiving only rejections I was accepted to U of T and wait-listed to Western. I will be accepting U of T's offer, so hopefully someone gets bumped up a few spots on the waiting list! DON'T GIVE UP if you receive rejections! It is not a race after all!
  42. 4 points
    My anecdotal experience suggests that students who have spent a few years doing something other than school are often more emotionally and intellectually prepared for the rigors of graduate school than those who went straight through. There are obviously exceptions to this, but I certainly don't think there is any imperative to go straight to graduate school in order to be successful.
  43. 4 points
    Wimsey

    2020 Applicants

    Popping in to join the UVA rejection party! I'm just glad I know now and not on April 13 or some such nonsense. With Virginia out of the way, I am leaning toward WashU.
  44. 4 points
    You should certainly make and weigh your own choices. However, is that debt going to accrue interest in Ph.D world, when it will be hard to pay it down? And then need to be paid off when you're in a likely-terrible job market? It's just worth thinking about. At 22, you really have so much time to go back to school, and there are a lot of things you can do outside the academy (psychologically, financially, just having-an-interesting-life-wise) to supplement your career in it. Just my two cents.
  45. 4 points
    ohhhlala9

    Prep for Language Exams

    I had to do language exams for my MA and PhD and both institutions had us translate selections from exhibition catalogs. In addition to general language study, I used to practice by reading catalogs that were published in English and my target language, as well as museum online catalogs (highly recommend the Louvre if you plan to take a French language exam). It was extremely helpful in learning art-specific vocabulary.
  46. 4 points
    acran

    MSW Applications Fall 2020

    Just got accepted into COLUMBIA!!!
  47. 4 points
    statisticalsleuth

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    It's looking like the NSF will fund 2000 individuals again this year. Information from an article from Feb. 13, 2020: The 2021 budget proposal also puts NSF’s flagship graduate fellowship research program (GRFP) under the knife, proposing a 20% drop from 2000 annual fellowships to 1600. Begun in 1952, the fellowship program is a pillar of NSF’s investment in training the next generation of scientists, and several labor economists have argued that its success warrants growing it to 3000. [NSF Director] Córdova, however, has repeatedly proposed trimming GRFP since President Donald Trump took office, in some years down to 1500. In 2017 she said it was time to compare its impact with that of other mechanisms for supporting graduate students, notably traineeships and through research grants. And NSF’s current program announcement says the agency plans to make 1600 awards in fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The Senate has rejected previous attempts to trim the program, however. For example, the final 2020 spending bill approved a few months ago ordered NSF to stay at 2000 slots. An NSF spokesperson says the agency will comply with that language. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/how-congress-could-reverse-cuts-trump-s-budget-request-nsf
  48. 4 points
    mh22

    NSF GRFP 2019-2020

    I mean, I'm sure they just compare you somewhere in the middle. Is it fair to compare students at prestigious institutions with those at schools with less resources? Not really, but metrics for scholarship judgement are never perfect.
  49. 4 points
    celestial nomad

    Playwriting MFAs

    Ah, how invigorating to see so many positive updates and decisions! I clearly don't check this page often but feel really proud of and psyched for you all. Regarding NPX, I echo the yeses - totally join! I started mine early this February, and two weeks later had an inquiry from Iowa State University!! They asked to buy rights but I offered the piece for free, always down for supporting education, of course. Here's mine: https://newplayexchange.org/users/38801/ellis-stump As for me, I applied to six programs this round, my second year applying. Got 3 acceptances, 2 waitlists, and 1 rejection. While NYU and Columbia are my top choices and naturally the ones waitlisted, every day I inch closer to committing to University of London actually. Full funding and a new country... After quarantine, I think I'll crave a breakout from NYC, lol. Wishing the best for everyone right now! Health, optimism, creativity, and peace!
  50. 4 points
    FutureAuD8

    Audiology Applicants 2020

    I appreciate everyone right to an opinion but I think negativity is not beneficial and this is the weakness our field faces. Those that do not support audiologists are a cause for the reasons some audiologists do not like their jobs. I’m a current AuD student and I have LOVED my experiences so far so prospective students keep your chins high. In my outside sites I have felt respected by other medical professionals and they value the work that we do. Interdisciplinary education is important and audiology is growing in importance and this is reflecting in our recognition and referrals from other professionals. I have experienced a vast scope of practice and SO much more than “just diagnostics” in my clinical placements. I’ve been involved in tinnitus evals and treatment, Auditory processing, educational audiology, pediatrics, assistive listening devices, fitting custom hearing protection, the moment of fitting a patient with hearing aids for the first time or new hearing aids it honestly amazing. I agree the pay may not be exactly what you would imagine for a doctorate degree but you are in this field for something beyond the pay. You enter this for a patients and honestly THAT is how you stay happy in any career because you truly enjoy what you do everyday. Also for that median salary that seems a bit skewed to me. I know individuals that start out and receive 80k a year starting and that’s in the Midwest where the cost of living in low. A also saw a recent job posting for the Midwest in a densely audiologist populated area and starting was 72k which is not bad at all. Also I do not agree with that statistic of individuals dropping out is also wrong. I would say if anything 1 student for less per class drops and often it is due to personal reasons not due to loss of faith in the field. If you are a prospective student don’t let negativity get in your way. This can be an incredibly supportive profession especially if you know the people to surround yourselves with. We are in this to help people and improve their quality of life. I have loved my experiences with patients and the respect they and other professionals give me and THAT is why I am proud to be a future audiologist.


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