Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/06/2020 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    In fact those are bad news. The tweet is a campaign movement in Trump's intention on denial covid and shift agenda to immigration. Now there is a change in the F1 regulation for virtual schools. Even though I'm not in the US at this moment, and my school has announced next semester will be in person, and I'm waiting for a visa interview, I take this new movement personal. My school has told me many times: you are welcome here, but the department of state makes me feel just the opposite. The whole process of getting a visa is just about being treated as a criminal for wanting to go to grad school and prove that you are not going to steal the job of American born. I have burned a lot of money in doing so. With new restrictions in the coming days, like puting an end date for F1 status and more restrictions on OPT program, and the real possibility of Trump's relection, the US seems a bad place for being a student. Now I'm facing with the reality: there are better places in the world for being an international student, where you can feel respected and treated like a human being.
  2. 8 points
    AP

    2021 Application Thread

    Just a reminder to everyone who is applying this year. You had a difficult first half of 2020. We, faculty, did too. Grad students did too (many lost summer stipends, many doing international research saw their projects disappear). Staff did too. Admin, believe or not, did too. Our situations are all different, some with kids, some with visas, some with racial justice concerns, some with loneliness, some with illness. This year, you are anxious about applying, but also anxious about applying in the middle of a pandemic. You have many questions for which there are no answers. We have many questions for which there are no answers. I have no idea how I will teach in the Fall. I have no idea how I can re-structure my book project so that I push going to the archive. All this is to say that in the same way the pandemic is making you anxious about the unknown, it is making us worried. This might translate into people taking longer to respond to your emails as some folks are WFH with kids or caring for others, or they are simply just taking some time off. People might not have an answer for all of you questions or that answer being contingent on many variables. People might understand your concerns but might regrettably not be able to do anything about it (I really wish I could unilaterally abolish GREs). In other words, be patient. While the summer is usually a good time to write to faculty because we don't have any meetings or deadlines (we are just out in the field going to archives), this summer is way different. ( @coffeehum this is not to you specifically, but you made me think about how I would react if a student sent me an email this week to discuss admissions. So, thank you for the inspiration!)
  3. 7 points
    AP

    2021 Application Thread

    For the short answer, see @Sigaba's suggestion. I'll address two things that are more long term. [These are things I usually comment on: basically an invitation to leave the undergraduate mentality and transition to that of the graduate student] 1) One of the things few people tell you about graduate programs in the humanities is the autonomy you are given and are expected to use. This means that it is your responsibility to communicate with the right people in a professional and timely manner. As I always say: your graduate career begins with your application (not when you are admitted). Show that you are a professional scholar and ask for the information that you want. You will probably get better answers that will ease your anxiety (even if the answer is "we don't know") than asking in this forum to speculate. (I completely agree with your take on the home GRE. I think GRE are prohibitive altogether, even without the pandemic. Man, I think all standardized tests should be banned!). 2) I understand what you mean by not wanting to be a "problem." Believe me, I have a great relationship with my advisor and still walk on eggshells and write emails like a million times. However, I'd invite you to take a different approach with an example. I'm faculty, and if an applicant sent me an email in the middle of the summer asking about GRE requirements and lashing out their situation and their opinions, you are right. It wouldn't cause a good impression on me. However, if you first email was: "Dear Dr. XXX, I hope this email finds you well [lame, but you have to]. I'm writing because I'm interested in applying to the History Program at Y University. My research interests are [two sentences]. I have experience in../conducted research on.../I would further examine... . I wonder if you have any insights on the application requirements and the process, especially regarding the impact of Covid". That alone will get you a response without venting on someone's inbox. At the same time, check with program administrators and/or DGS because they will have the most updated administrative answers. Remember that GREs are usually (but not always) school-wide requirements so professors often do not have the bits and pieces of these. In short, if you do not want to be a problem, then don't be a problem, which is not the same as don't do anything or don't stand up for yourself. You SHOULD ask questions.
  4. 5 points
  5. 4 points
    psstein

    2021 Application Thread

    I would also suggest that some faculty aren't always keenly attuned to the administrative parts of any department. While I was still in graduate school, both of my supervisors were very much of that mold. TT or tenured faculty have many important things on their plates at any given time. Bureaucracy usually is not among the more important elements.
  6. 4 points
    higaisha

    GRExit Thread

    I think those are all arguments for making it optional and not banning it outright, and the fact that those arguments are helping programs justify making it mandatory is unfair. The evidence i've seen for the predictive utility of the GRE was weak, and weak/mixed validity is seen across disciplines (bio, physics). The most it can (almost) do is predict grad GPA, which is basically irrelevant in the greater scheme of academic accomplishment. Tbh even if it was free, people should only take the GRE if they want to, and it makes perfect sense to supplement a lower GPA/etc. Can you tell I hate this exam? LOL
  7. 4 points
    I'm sick of being told to keep politics away. At the moment we have to go to an embassy to ask for a visa everything are politics. The last movement of SEVIS is hostile. It creates much more uncertainty on international students. We have no certainty that even if we made it to study in the US rules won't change in a detrimental way. I think we are smart people; choosing a place for going to grad school is not only about academics, and looking on local policies for international students should be one important aspect to take into account.
  8. 3 points
  9. 3 points
    This is an updated Canadian thread (and American in the other tab) of schools in clin psych that have removed the GRE. With proof/links to website. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1f6ZyVGn-opa_ijRyntHxfJJkaSNya4h-bwEDeDGInv4/edit#gid=1109387584
  10. 3 points
    I attached an image of a list I was keeping track of - for every program that says yes that GRE is required right now, I emailed them to make sure, and the ones who have replied I include extra info in the brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?". Every program that I listed as No = they don't require it confirmed Edit: the ones where I have no brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?" means they didnt reply to my email yet, and when I say "GRE Required?" is "No" it means their website says it or their email reply to me said it
  11. 3 points
    Yeah, I feel this really hard too. I'm fortunate enough to be in a program already, but I just turned 30 and while all my other friends are buying houses and having babies, my husband and I are stuck in this waiting game since we can't afford kids right now (I can't take time off from practicum without making myself less competitive for internship). It makes it even more evident when a few of my cohort-mates got in straight out of undergrad. I love them, but it's hard not to be the teeniest bit jealous that they will be 26 (younger than I was when starting) when we graduate and I'll be 33. It seems like there is always another hurdle. I truly wish all of you the best of luck in your application cycles. I hope you find your perfect fits!
  12. 3 points
    asingh25

    Canada MSW 2020

    received an email this morning that i was accepted off of western's waitlist for the 2 year msw program! keep your heads up everyone, waitlists are moving slowly but surely i was on the waitlist since march 10.
  13. 3 points
    Cryss

    visa appointment

    Just got an email from my embassy saying they will open limited appointments from July 14th specifically for student visas and petition-based visas. Will keep you guys updated.
  14. 3 points
    TMP

    2021 Application Thread

    it is worth bringing up the issue of the GRE. You won't be the only one figuring out whether to study for it at all when your time could be better spent continuing to revise your SOP and writing sample. Right now, everyone is very tied up with the fall semester preparations (including the latest drama over international students) that graduate admissions may be sitting on the back burner. Truthfully, I think you may be best off asking the Graduate School administration about the GRE, it's the one that usually wants it, not the departments (at least not in History).
  15. 3 points
    A little off-topic, but I heard Trump's push for everything to reopen despite record-high cases may be his way of getting many voting polls to close in densely-populated areas (aka, democratic cities mainly), since Fall will bring about an unimaginable spike in cases. I hope this is just a conspiracy, but we've already seen this happen in Georgia during the primaries... Anyway, fuck 45.
  16. 3 points
    Please sign this petition and support international graduate students: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/allow-f-1-students-stay-us-through-fall-semester-if-instruction-online-due-pandemic
  17. 2 points
    I just had a meeting with my PhD advisor about what school might look like this coming fall and the overall gist I'm getting is that things are going to be a bit wild and fly by our seats. I was wondering how everyone on Grad Cafe is doing? Those planning to apply this fall, how is that going? Those about to start or continue grad school, what is that looking like for you? ---- I've got three kiddos I'm trying to figure out what their school is going to look like, my spouse is in an essential industry so that has also been quite a ride, and then the only thing I really feel like I've "got" for the coming fall is that they clinic at my program is going to be done telehealth style- which I feel fairly confident about doing at this point. Not an expert, but between all the random trainings I've done (thank you PESI) and the practice I got at the end of my master program last year I think it will be okay. What about everyone else, what are you freaking out about and what is going alright?
  18. 2 points
    higaisha

    GRExit Thread

    harvard made it optional! wooohooo
  19. 2 points
    PSA to all program websites: make it easier to find faculty research interests and streamline your content! I am tired of having to scour sites for information about research interests, having to open a million tabs to sort through faculty, and finding faculty webpages with minimal to no information about their current research. It seems like it would be super easy to have one central webpage that has a brief research bio for each faculty member, right? Right?? Ugh. Anyways, end rant lol.
  20. 2 points
    I don't know if this applies to your school/state, since different schools would have different policies, but here's Duke's stance on a remote first semester/year: "An incoming international student who has not secured a valid visa or does not enter the U.S. is not subject to U.S. immigration law and thus may take a full set of online Duke classes while residing abroad."
  21. 2 points
    Not sure how many international students are in this forum but check this out if you are international students (especially if you are starting a school in this fall) US Immigration and Customs Enforcement just posted this on their website regarding some grave changes on international students entering US for schools. International students may not be allowed to enter the US or may have to transfer or leave the country if your school goes full online course this fall. I feel extremely disappointed and confused with this modification. I'm mostly worried for people who just got in and will be starting new. I also wonder if this will impact the coming application cycle as well. https://www.ice.gov/news/releases/sevp-modifies-temporary-exemptions-nonimmigrant-students-taking-online-courses-during
  22. 2 points
    Gregmat is such a king. Thank god for him
  23. 2 points
    Due to our moron-in-chief, our new incoming student (who we knew previously from work with our lab) is probably trapped in her country and may have to wait a full year to start. It's all political; Tr*mp wants to force schools to open, forcing the economy back on track at the expense of American (and international) lives. If you can, please VOTE.
  24. 2 points
    Danique

    2020 Canadian SLP Thread

    Hi everyone! I was waitlisted for the speech program at Dalhousie for fall 2020. It’s my first time applying and I’m wondering if anyone knows how many people typically get waitlisted each year! Trying to figure out if there is any hope of getting in especially where we’re already in July. Any info would be appreciated. :)
  25. 2 points
    The last four schools you listed are the ones I definitely think of as having spatial/environmental focuses. I'd also look at Texas A&M. Your math background is less than ideal, with your only proof-based grades being the C and B in real analysis, but as a domestic student from a top 10 program, I still think programs like Mizzou and Oregon State are likely safe options, and you have a decent shot at a lot of the other PhD programs.
  26. 2 points
    Mickey26

    GRExit Thread

    Yeah tbh I also heard they don't care about the writing portion, although to me, that seems like the section you SHOULD care about the most?? LOL Who knows how admissions works LOL Better clarification on the admissions process, including how they're factoring GRE scores if they do take them but aren't required, would be fantabulous and I can sit back and say my work here is done /endrant
  27. 2 points
    ElleG

    Applying to NPSIA - MUNK - Fall 2020

    In addition to Hawkmoon's comment, you maintain full time status regardless of number of courses. They are opening all courses this Friday - so we can take something else just in case. That being said, I don't know why most of us did not have the ability to get into our own courses. Since I am in IIA and courses were closed I may take a diplomacy stream course and request being switched as I cannot fullfil my specialization
  28. 2 points
    PsychApplicant2

    GRExit Thread

    Agreed. Not required is basically saying "we can't force you to take the GREs but we're still going to favor students who submit scores." I only know of one clinical psych program in America that doesn't accept them.
  29. 2 points
    justacigar

    GRExit Thread

    Not accepting vs not required is such a huge difference. Would be so great if more programs followed suit this cycle!
  30. 2 points
    psychapplicant21

    GRExit Thread

    I agree, and as well even for those who have taken it at home I have read a lot of reports of technical issues with the proctor system prior to the test resulting in the test time being significantly longer - this additional stress could definitely impact negatively on scores. I plan to take the GRE at home because a test centre is not close by but I'm not feeling confident about the process!
  31. 2 points
    nwslp

    Deferring?

    I think what's hard about speech@NYU is that all of your clinical hours come from placements in your area and even in person programs are struggling to get second years placements so I just don't see how first years are going to get them outside of a campus clinic next year. I say apply but ask a LOT of questions and maybe try to find a current speech@NYU student to see how they're handling the pandemic.
  32. 1 point
    @psychcoffeegal I feel you dude! Been taking practice tests for quant and it's.. it's not pretty... I've always been bad with algebra and it doesn't help that my study partner excels at math.
  33. 1 point
    I don't think it will be a factor in admissions, but it could be a factor for funding. One of the grad coordinators said my work experience (no peer reviewed papers published) helped me get a fellowship offer.
  34. 1 point
    EileanDonan

    GRExit Thread

    Now I can spend less money on my inevitably-rejected application. 👍
  35. 1 point
    Admissions is mostly based on grades, test scores, and letters of recommendation. Industry experience can indicate some programming experience and some general life experience that I think could be viewed positively, but it's not going to be a major factor. But, if you're not in school taking hard math classes or doing research that will get you papers and letters of recommendation, what is there to lose? Go make some money.
  36. 1 point
    PsychApplicant2

    GRExit Thread

    "In order to truly eliminate the use of GRE scores, the program is not allowing any applicants to submit GRE scores with their admissions materials." DePaul University is doing it right!!
  37. 1 point
    Sigaba

    2021 Application Thread

    ^This guidance is golden. I received a similar note from a professor who was something of a big deal but it didn't really resonate at the time. I would not ask a professor about the GRE requirements. IME, the question may come across as the dreaded "Is this going to be on the midterm?" question some undergraduates invariably ask when a historian is leaning into an important point. Also, you never know when you might be dealing with an academic who has the mindset "I took the GRE, so why shouldn't you?"
  38. 1 point
    Keep working on the research stuff. Your GPA is honestly fine. As long as it's 3.5+, you're usually in good shape, especially if your psych GPA is higher. Do you have a faculty mentor who would be willing to help you write a manuscript with the data you have? No one would expect you to be doing that on your own as an undergrad (or even an early year grad student). Edited to Add: Also, try spending the rest of your undergrad thinking about your specific research and clinical interests. While this may evolve and change (and most likely will), having a clear idea that you can articulate in your statement of purpose during application season can go a long way.
  39. 1 point
    alyssa_

    USC MS Biostatistics Fall 2020

    I applied to USC's MS Biostatistics program for Fall 2020 last month and haven't heard anything back yet. Was wondering if anyone has applied to this program for Fall 2020 and heard anything from them?
  40. 1 point
    Just my 2 cents, We are likely to see to notice the differences rather than the similarities. Therefore, it is easier to overestimate th differences rather than the similarities. I dont know if there is a exact name for this. But here is my thought.
  41. 1 point
    Schy

    GRExit Thread

    LOLLLLL what a coincidence! I'm looking forward to going to my first! I only found out about him recently, I'm very happy there are people out there willing to help for almost no money at all.
  42. 1 point
    Hi there. I'm in the same situation. My school said I'd be notified in early July, so far still nothing. I'm told that the school is still figuring out how Fall semester will run. I also don't know if they just leave me hanging or if there's something else behind. Just want to let you know you're not alone, whichever school you're waiting to hear from.
  43. 1 point
    Mickey26

    GRExit Thread

    Absolutely agree 110%. Myself and other graduate students are currently advocating for "not accepting scores at all." But my institution hasn't even made a decision yet! *fingers crossed* There is still hope!
  44. 1 point
    Paisley123

    macro concentration

    I'm leaning toward Rutgers. They have a big macro program with many options for certificates. They also have a 100% online option if you want to check it out. its way, way cheaper than Columbia. There is also Ramapo College in northern NJ. I think they have a few new yorkers there. And then the College of Staten Island has a macro focus but the whole school is bent on the disability population. Finally, i am considering Seton Hall because although they don't have a particular focus macro/direct they do have a forensics focus with a generalist approach. I am considering them because they are a small school and I don't know if I want to do a huge university again. I am a Hunter graduate.
  45. 1 point
    hi Jujubea, i'd be interested in join the group! what's next?
  46. 1 point
    Honestly, I'm pretty discouraged. I graduated with my B.A. in 2011 and it took me some time to figure out what I really wanted to do (shouldn't have let people push me towards college right after high school). Then I realized that, to be decently prepared and get into a M.A. program, I needed a second bachelor's degree. Originally I planned to start graduate school in the fall of 2019, but there was a scheduling issue with a course for my B.S. and I wasn't able to graduate until this past December. I did actually get into the school that I wanted to go to for the fall of 2019, but deferred until fall of 2020. What's even worse is that I got interviews for two of the three assistantships that I applied for, only to be told a month after these interviews that they weren't going to be hiring anyone (I'm assuming because of pandemic related funding issues). I can't afford graduate school without funding (see debt for two bachelor's degrees) and I can't defer admission to this school more than once, so I get to reapply. All this to go into a field that is going to be difficult to find a job in and will likely not pay a ton once/if I get there. It sucks because it took me so much agonizing to figure out what I wanted to do.
  47. 1 point
    ItowinSLP

    Deferring?

    @sbram94no one can really predict what's going to happen next year. I heard another wave of the corona virus is might come. My advice is if you get in, then talk to them about deferring if you are not ready to start.
  48. 1 point
    Artgirl87

    2021FALL pls evaluate my profile

    I should begin by saying that I know very little. In fact, no one on here *really* knows much when it comes to admissions; we're all just riffing off personal experience and inferred/presumed values. BUT, what I do know is that none of the things that you mentioned above are going to get you into a PhD program. By the same token, none of these things are going to preclude your entrance. You have a really solid GPA and some great experience—but, of course, that isn't enough. The things that you haven't mentioned are far more critical in getting you into a program: a strong vision of your research interests and a compelling sample paper. In my experience, these two things will carry greater weight in determining your admission. Don't worry about not going to an Ivy; worry about the things that you can change — and that actually matter. Bonne chance!
  49. 1 point
    Congrats to everyone who's getting accepted!!! So happy for you!! I'm currently a senior majoring in Neuroscience at Brandeis. If anyone has questions about the environment, PIs, grad level courses, Boston area, etc., feel free to reach out!! I know the current situation with COVID-19 is making potential visits difficult for many prospective students - so I'm happy to chat w/ anyone about decisions or even if you're having a hard time and just want to talk. (Stay safe!)
  50. 1 point
    PROFILE: Type of Undergrad Institution: Big state school Major(s)/Minor(s): International Affairs & Economics (majors)/Russian Studies (minor) Undergrad GPA: 3.89 GRE: V:166 Q:159 AW:5.5 Any Special Courses: Not really Letters of Recommendation: Three tenured professors—no one famous or anything Research Experience: None Teaching Experience: Economics tutor (no experience teaching a class) Subfield/Research Interests: IR/IPE Other: I have a lot of language study in my background. RESULTS: Acceptances($$ or no $$): Rochester ($$) and UPenn ($$) p.s. Why do we use two dollar signs? Why not one? Waitlists: Not-a-one Rejections: Um, a lot. 12, in fact. But all from really great programs that I certainly cannot blame for not taking me. Going to: Undecided LESSONS LEARNED: Well, I second the advice about applying to a lot of schools. It is expensive and it is stressful. But the way I see it, if you only apply to programs you really respect and wish to be a part of, you only need one acceptance to make your dreams come true. There are so many factors we can't control. Make it easier on yourself by having 10 dream schools instead of one. I was so scared that applying directly out of undergrad with no research experience would write me off immediately. I could not be happier with my offers! SOP: A NOTE: I feel a little embarrassed about sharing this. A lot of people feel the need to keep privacy here, but other than removing names of universities and professors and taking out the parts I added on a school-by-school basis, I wanted to give future applicants an unaltered example. (Though beware, future applicants, this is an example of mediocrity, I promise you.) Along the lines of lessons learned, I think I really should have started on my SOP sooner and re-drafted more. If I were applying again next year, I’d probably try to get rid of some of the background-y stuff and focus more on want I want to do in the future. Oh well. All’s well that ends well! Oh, and also, the research I proposed is not exactly IR, it’s more CP, but the professors I’ve talked to since getting accepted don’t seem to be bothered by overlapping/fluid research interests. Anyway, here it is: [Last year, my identity authorized me to live and study in 29 different countries. A German passport deserves credit for 26, the Schengen Area, and my American passport carried student visas for both Canada and Russia. As a citizen of America and a citizen of Europe, it was simple for me to acquire this priceless mobility clearance. That is, unearned privilege, bestowed upon me based on my citizenship, afforded me access to further privileges. This is not a revelation, but it has troubled me, and appears now as the foundation for my research interests. My passports protect me from the complications of borders. It is safe to say I have taken advantage of my opportunities to travel. I toured the railways of Europe and enjoyed a summer of white nights in St. Petersburg, but the two experiences I find most valuable were the ones that convinced me to change direction. I attended my first year of college at University X. I majored in biology—a decision that amuses those who know me now—but health problems prevented me from taking my final exams in the second semester, thus saving me from that dark path to medical school. Having been redirected but not quite sure where to go, I spent a year in Germany. I went to learn my father’s language and to allow myself time to evaluate a life dissociated from academia. In an intensive German language program, I achieved fluency in half a year. Languages, I discovered, come more easily to me than to most, but the real impetus for my progress was the rigor and focus of the work. My day was exercise and application, beginning with five hours of classes and persisting as I tried to order coffee or give directions or buy a train ticket. Evenings were for homework. I flourished. I came home in the spring and promptly enrolled for summer classes at University Y. German language would not be my main academic focus, but the discovery of an unexplored interest was invigorating, and I had learned something stirring and important about myself as well: I do best when I am fully immersed. My preoccupation with international relations began with economics. In a course on development economics, Professor X explained the potential failures of inequality scales, addressed the theories and realities of microfinance, and gave an overview of risk analysis in migration decisions. With these models, economics ceased to look like a flat but satisfying collection of abstractions. Instead of obscurity, I saw real-world application. Instead of sanitary models, I saw fallibility. Dissatisfaction was a thrill. My research interests emanate from the questions Professor X’s course taught me to ask. Political science courses then built me a framework for my new knowledge. A course on the international political economy helped unify my academic interests; remittances and the global terms of trade were topics that caught my attention best. Professor Y and his class on foreign policy provided the last piece of the puzzle: policy implications. Now I want all three. I want to learn to conduct research horizontally, cross-examining economic models and political theory with proposed and enacted policy. This returns me to the inherent privilege granted by American citizenship. The mobility I commanded a year ago is attributed to globalization, which has pleased efficiency-minded economists with its progress toward the free movement of goods and capital. Yet American citizenship is rare. Aside from exceptions like the Schengen Area, which makes my German passport so potent, the world is resisting advancement toward the free movement of labor. Migration marks an impasse at the confluence of economics, political science and state policy. Economics tells us that immigration is a natural market dynamic and a reaction to wage differentials, but that similarly-skilled workers and local government—the losers—will oppose it. Political science adds that sovereignty and borders are enmeshed, and that national identity is associated with ethnicity and that nebulous concept, culture. Policy obliges political leaders to weigh public opinion against economic gains, while legislators, in the American political system at least, are more likely to be subject to localities—the aforementioned losers. As a graduate student, I hope to address these relationships by looking more closely at assimilation. My first step would be to put parameters on what is now an amorphous notion; I want to conduct a comparative review of the measurement of assimilation, and to determine whether official gauges are commensurate with public perceptions. In terms of political theory, this project would involve the study of ethnic amalgamation, in which the working hypothesis would be that public expectations for assimilation can never be met. That is, as long as society A expects to subsume society B, the amalgam society C will always be perceived as transitional. With this application, I declare my intent to pursue a Ph.D. in Political Science with a concentration in the subfield of International Relations. I hope to use this education to obtain a position at a university or independent research institution that will allow me to conduct research and write on contemporary issues. While my greatest strength is writing, I also take pleasure in teaching, and believe that either type of institution would suit me well. I wish to emphasize my awareness of the dedication required to succeed in this program, and to express appreciation for the time afforded to review my application.] Boy this post got long. Sorry guys!


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.