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  1. 36 points
    Bopie5

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Just got an email that I got the tuition waiver + the stipend at Villanova! Will be confirming my acceptance of the offer tonight!
  2. 36 points
    dilby

    2019 Applicants

    In at yale, oh my god
  3. 35 points
    All is well my dude. You have 3 interviews to clinical psychology programs; the most competitive graduate degree in the country. There will always be someone with more interviews, more publications, and a higher salary. This field is filled with rejection at every step of your career. Schools will reject you, internships will toss your application in the trash, and reviewers will tear your manuscripts to shreds. It sounds like you worked hard to get where you are. But there are others who worked just as hard who have weaker applications because their PI wasn't a productive scholar or who couldn't afford to volunteer for 20 hours a week. You've made it pretty far. There are thousands of qualified people who would kill to be in your shoes. I urge you to be grateful and enjoy the process.
  4. 34 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Acceptances

    In off the waitlist at Loyola
  5. 34 points
    dilby

    2019 Acceptances

    In at Yale. My one admit of the season. I'm speechless.
  6. 32 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Acceptances

    Just got a call from Dr. Sae Saue offering me admission to SMU
  7. 31 points
    Bopie5

    2019 Acceptances

    GOT INTO THE VILLANOVA MA! Funding pending, but I am OVER THE MOON!
  8. 30 points
    5/5 down for rejections, who wants to have a misery party? See y'all next cycle Jokes aside, I'm happy I made it as far as I did, applying to the top POIs at the top schools in Canada straight out of undergrad and still getting a few interviews. My GREs were pretty crap, none of my refs were even clinical psychologists and I had 0 connections to most of my PIs. Gonna take this time to retake GREs, build up my research, and smash the next cycle next year (or just wait two years depending on my job). I said I'd be upfront about rejections, so if you're feeling down about yours, just know everything happens for a reason and now wasn't your time--but next year/two years might be. LOVE U CANADA THREADDDD
  9. 29 points
    After reading through all 23 pages, I think I've managed to compile the most salient (at least for me) and still relevant pieces of advice as far as grad school supplies Laptop - While most people have a laptop, it was recommended by several people that folks in a new laptop (unless yours is less than two years old) and make sure you get an extended warranty (one that will hopefully last the entirety of your program). Note: look into funding opportunities for laptops within your department. Some will finance a new laptop for incoming grad students! Desk - L-shaped came highly recommended, given the extra space. While i love my little desk, I may invest in a larger one by year 2. Chair (Desk) - Investing in a good chair was stressed many times. You will likely be spending many hours hunched over a desk. get one that will be comfortable for your back, but won't put you to sleep. Chair (Reading) - a separate reading chair was recommended for those hours upon hours where you'll be reading. a comfortable chair or couch was recommended. Printer - there was some debate regarding the pros/cons of a printer. In an increasingly digital age, I don't think a printer is completely necessary. ESPECIALLY because so many universities have printers available and printing costs included within stipends. But this will depend on the person Scanner OR File Cabinet - One person had recommended getting a file cabinet and regularly organizing it so as not to fall behind (if you are someone who likes having physical copies of everything, then go for this option). HOWEVER, someone then chimed in to say screw a file cabinet. just get a scanner. and i thought that was an excellent idea! just scan everything you need and chuck the physical copies (unless its like your birth certificate or something) Coffee - Coffee maker, coffee carafe (to keep it warm for those days of marathon working), french press. you get the idea. ALTERNATIVE: electric kettle for tea drinkers Large Water Bottle - lets be sustainable folks! Snacks - for those long days Wall Calendar Dry Erase Board Noise Cancelling Headphones External Hard Drive Dongles - actually didn't see folks write about this, so I'm adding it! Dongles/adapters are constantly changing based on your device. Get the one that is specific to your computer to HDMI and VGA, and you should be set for most campus systems! Paper shredder - unless your campus has a shredding removal service like my current one has. I'd say take advantage of that Travel - Luggage, toiletry bag, international travel adapter/converter, etc. You will presumably be traveling a bunch! Get the right travel accessories if you can Desk accessories - post its, highlighters, pens Notebooks - it seems like everyone has been unanimously pro-moleskine notebooks on here. mmmm I'm not! What *EYE* recommend is going to your local art supply store, and buying sketchbooks from there. They are usually so much cheaper. And most art stores have artist and student memberships available, so you can get major discounts. I just showed a sale and got all my notebooks and pens for less than $30. Just my opinion Software - Just some of the software that came highly recommended and that I felt like was still relevant today: Evernote. Zotero. Scrivener. CamScanner. Nuance. iStudiez Most of this is hella obvious. But some of these I hadn't even considered! And its nice to think about these things early so you have enough time to save up or search the internet for deals. I curated an Amazon wishlist based on the information i listed above. Let me know if you'd like me to post it here and make public! And remember: 90% (if not all) of this is OPTIONAL. Let's not make academia seem more inaccessible than it already is. You will excel regardless of whether or not you have these things. There's always borrowing. lending programs through your university. free services through your libraries. There are options! Hope this is helpful to those reading this post 8 years later! It was certainly helpful for me. Aside from curating a great list of things i want, it also helped distract me from decisions this week ://////
  10. 28 points
    Thanks! Good luck to everyone! I deduced that I received 0 invites this cycle and will try my best for the next cycle. For those with even just a single interview, know that hundreds of applicants would die to be in your shoes. I'm a bit heartbroken (0 invites from 10+ applications), but also have the foresight and resilience to get through another year. I'm just happy I get to finally take off these worry pants and go back to the focused grind. Best of luck to those with interviews and those still holding out!
  11. 28 points
    I'm ducking in to wish all applicants good luck during this interview season! I’m a faculty member, and I have now observed a number of application cycles at multiple institutions, including my own graduate program. I haven’t yet cracked the code to reducing the stress for my own trainees as they apply to doctoral programs, but because the ambiguity of the process can be the most stress-inducing, I thought I’d share some information that my trainees often find helpful. Long post ahead, and, disclaimer, the below is my opinion based on my experience and observation over the years and should not be used as the last word on the interview process. Things that befuddle, annoy, and/or freak out applicants during the interview season: Thing 1: I was not invited to interview at programs that are low on my list - now I’m really worried that I’m not competitive. (Sometimes followed by: but I got an interview at my top choice, so clearly lower list program should have interviewed me). Sanity check: One of the main reasons those programs were lower on your own list is because you perceived a lesser fit with them. The faculty reviewing applications also see that lesser fit compared with other applicants, and we know that a weak fit is a recipe for unhappiness for everyone! It’s not that you aren’t qualified, it’s just a fit thing combined with the number of other applicants to that program/person that year. Thing 2: I had stratospheric GRE scores and GPA, 28 years of RA experience, and 337 publications/presentations, but I didn’t get an interview to Program X (or any interviews). Sanity check: You all are a talented and successful lot with outstanding experience and evidence of productivity. Every year I am amazed by the quality of our applicant pool. There are four main possibilities here, none of which are particularly reassuring, but hopefully all of which help you think about this logically. First, the number one error I hear from applicants is that they assume that their stellar records will automatically assure them an interview, which is just not consistent with the numbers. Yes, you have an amazing record and application, but so do the other 300 people applying for 18 interview slots (and 5 offers) in that program this year. Second, applicants often apply to the “name brand” programs, seduced by perceived prestige and figuring that the strength of their scores/CVs will overcome a lack of fit. It won’t, and it shouldn’t (see comment above about unhappiness). Third, applicants often mistake “more” for “better”, without regard for the actual skills and knowledge. Most of us definitely are looking for quality over quantity in your CV. Middle author of 6 authors on 9 publications/presentations is good, and we like to see that level of involvement, but one 1st author paper/presentation at professional conference is more meaningful. More labs is not necessarily better than one lab with really solid breadth and depth of skills learned. In your CV and statement I’m especially looking for evidence of advanced understanding (appropriate to the level of training) of the research process and the research questions conceptually, not just a laundry list of every task you ever did as an RA. Fourth, and this is a tricky one - if there is something about you or your performance (e.g., in your lab) that might lead your letter writers to hedge a bit in their letters, we can read that as a red flag and, given we have the luxury of a large number of applicants, put that application off to the side. You already should be asking writers if they are willing to write “a strong letter”, rather than just a letter, and making sure to ask your mentors for feedback on where you stand with regard to the qualities of a strong applicant. Thing 3: Why are all of the applications due on Dec 1?? Sanity check: This is usually a Graduate School deadline, because the relevant staff need to process the applications for all departments in the Graduate School before sending the applications to the relevant departments. Early December is a sweet spot that gives the staff time to process literally thousands of applications before the chaos of end of semester + holidays. Thing 4: If the applications are due Dec 1, why does it take so long to hear about interviews?? Similarly, why do some programs make interview offers early, but I don’t hear from others until much later? Sanity check: It is surprisingly difficult to find time for a committee to meet, so some programs find the time earlier and others later. It also takes varying amounts of time for the Graduate Schools to send applications to departments/programs. At my current institution we basically have most of them within a few days of the deadline, whereas at my last institution it usually took about 10 days to 2 weeks, which then lands faculty in the end of semester/finals, followed by the holidays. Then once we have the applications we need time to review them, which usually involves multiple faculty reviewing each of a very large number of applications. Note also that you WANT the faculty not to rush that review process. Thing 5: Why do these programs seem to schedule interviews on the same days?? Sanity check: There are only so many days available for interviewing. Most programs understandably choose Mondays or Fridays, and there are far more programs than Mondays and Fridays between the end of January and the end of most (not all) interviews toward the end of February. Google CUDCP application tools (freely available calendar maintained by the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology, which is not connected to me in any way and is not commercial) to see the schedule of most clinical program interviews. Thing 6: I have an interview scheduling conflict, and I’m really worried that Program B will think I’m not interested because I can’t attend their interview. Sanity check: We completely understand that strong applicants will have multiple interviews (one year I had a trainee who had 13 interviews), and that there will be overlap in dates. We also understand that accepting an interview prior to our invitation isn’t a reflection of your interest in the program. We’ll do what we can to schedule an alternative informal interview in person, or via video or phone call. Thing 7: I wasn’t invited to interview/wasn’t given an offer, but it took a long time to get an official rejection?? Sanity check: Mostly this is a program-level or Grad School level thing. Sending an official rejection generally is an administrative process that might be automated through the Grad School or the program, and many programs will wait until they have their list of applicants who have accepted before officially closing the applicant pool and generating rejection emails/letters. Sometimes it’s just not prioritizing the applicants, but I think that’s the minority. Thing 8: I wasn’t interviewed/didn’t get an offer. Can I contact the program/POI to ask for feedback on my application? Sanity check: This is just my opinion, but I wouldn’t. Your current mentor/PI should be able to tell you where any weaknesses are in your application, thus the only thing the applied-to program/POI could tell you was that the other applicants were a better fit, which doesn’t really help you at all. Also, and very importantly, note that faculty at some institutions are prohibited from providing such feedback given it takes only one litigious applicant to try to make the case that there was some illegal flaw in the selection process. Post-interview Things Thing 9: The interview day was 2 weeks ago. Why haven’t I heard yet? Sanity check: Programs want to make their offers as early and as quickly as possible (this is also why you shouldn’t contact a program post-interview about your status). Usually there needs to be another faculty/admissions committee meeting post-interview, which might take a little time to schedule, and also there might be a few remaining Zoom/Skype interviews lagging behind. We aren’t sitting on this information; once we know who we want to make offers to, we’ll be in touch immediately. Thing 10: I thought my interview went really well - I had great discussions and rapport with the POI and the students, and I can really see myself there, but I was rejected/waitlisted. Sanity check: You probably did interview really well! Unfortunately we faculty often find ourselves in the position of having fewer slots than outstanding interviewees. It’s a numbers thing, and again not necessarily a reflection on you or your interview performance. Thing 11: I have received multiple offers. Can I hold onto 2-3 offers for a while because it feels nice? Sanity check: Technically you can. But it would be extremely inconsiderate to the waitlisted applicants at the programs whose offers you don’t intend to accept. You generally would know at that point which offer you prefer, and although you still might be waiting to hear from another program, the considerate and ethical thing to do is to decline the offer(s) you know you won’t accept, and only hold one at a time. Thing 12: Should I buy my student host a thank you gift/card? Sanity check: Not at all necessary, and I wouldn’t - you have already spent enough money on interview travel! An emailed thank you is appreciated and more than enough. Thing 13: Should I send my POI a thank you card? Sanity check: Nope. Again an email is more than enough. Good luck, everyone! If this year doesn’t work out for you, don’t give up, and if it does, congratulations and best wishes with your program!
  12. 28 points
    About your dog: I think that depends entirely on you and your program. I am in a social science program where the majority of my analysis and writing can be done from home, and I prefer to work from home or from a library (as opposed to my cube in the windowless cube farm). When I was taking classes I was generally there from 9-6 or so, but now that my coursework is finished I am rarely at the school itself. I go for meetings, seminars, interesting kinds of things and I do most of my work remotely. My time is verrry flexible, and if my building didn't prohibit it I would get a dog in a heartbeat. Another thing to keep in mind: a dog can be a great comfort when you're all stressed out over graduate school. Advice? Age: -Don't feel like you have nothing to offer just because you are younger. I was 22 when I started graduate school. You got accepted to the program for a reason, and chances are you are just as equipped as any older students are to successfully complete the program, just in a different way. -Your older classmates may be just as terrified as you. Talk to them. You have a lot in common. You are, after all, in the same place. -You will feel like an imposter, like you don't belong, or like you are constantly behind. Or all three. It's normal. It will pass. (Well, sort of.) People of all ages go through this. Adviser related: -If you are lucky enough to get both research interest fit and personality fit perfect, congratulations! But sometimes, personality fit is more important than research interest fit as long as the research isn't too different. A great adviser is interested in your career development, likes you as a person, advocates for you, and wants to hear your ideas. Even if his or her research is quite different from yours, they may give you the autonomy to work on your own projects and just supervise you. A bad personality fit will drive you nuts, even if you love his or her research. Consider that when evaluating your adviser fit. (This will vary by field: research fit may be less important in the humanities, more important in the natural and physical sciences. Social sciences are somewhere in-between.) -Don't be afraid to be straight up blunt with your adviser when it comes to asking about your progress. Ask if you are where you should be both academic program wise and getting-a-job-after-this-mess-wise. -Be proactive. Advisers love when you draw up an agenda for your one-on-one meetings, come with talking points and progress to share, have concrete questions to ask, and have overall shown that you have been thoughtful and taken control of your own program. Of course, this won't immediately come easily to you, but in time you will work up to it. Every semester I type up my semester goals, and at the beginning of the year I type up annual goals. I show them to my adviser and we talk about whether they are too ambitious, or whether I need to revise them, and how I can meet them. -Don't expect your adviser to actually know what courses you have to take to graduate. They will know about comprehensive exams and the dissertation, but a lot of professors don't really keep up with the course requirements, especially if their program is in flux. Get you a student handbook, and find out what you need to take. Map it out in a grid, and check off things when you finish them. Show this to your adviser every semester. You may have to explain how such and such class fills a requirement. -Nobody loves you as much as you, except your mother. Keep this in mind as you take in advice from all sources, including your adviser. Your adviser is there to guide you, but that doesn't mean you have to do everything he says. Studying: -You will have to read more than you ever did before, in less time than you ever have before, and you will be expected to retain more than you ever have before. The way that you studied in undergrad may need some tweaking. Be prepared for this. -Corollary: you may find that your methods change with age or interests or time. I preferred to study alone in college, but in grad school, I prefer to study in groups. It keeps me on task and the socialization keeps me motivated. You may find that you shift from being a more auditory learner to a visual learner or whatever. -You will feel behind at first. This is normal. -At some point you will realize that your professors don't actually expect you to read everything they assign you. This, of course, will vary by program, but there will be at least one class where the reading is actually impossible to do in one week. The point is to read enough that you know the major themes and can talk intelligently about them, and then pick some of the readings to really dig into and think more deeply about. -For most programs, don't worry so much about grades. If you stay on top of your work and do what you're supposed to, you will probably get an A. How much grades matter varies from program to program. In some programs, a B is a signal that you are not up to par, and more than a few Bs will warrant a discussion with your adviser or the DGS. My program isn't like that - A, B, it's all meaningless. My adviser doesn't even know what my grades are. But at almost all programs, a C means you need to retake the course, and two Cs means you have to convince the DGS not to kick you out. Extracurricular activity: What's that? No, seriously: -A lot of your time will be unstructured. You will have coursework, but most grad classes meet once a week for two hours and you may have three classes. You may have meetings with your adviser every so often and some seminars or things to catch (like we have grand rounds and colloquia that are required), but a lot of time will be unstructured. However, since you have so much more work than you had in undergrad, you actually will have less free time than you had in undergrad. This may initially cause you great anxiety. It did for me. Some people love unstructured time, though. (I don't.) -Because of this, you'll have to be planful about your non-grad school related stuff. -TAKE TIME OFF. DO it. It's important for your mental health. However you do it doesn't matter. Some people work it like a 9-5 job. Some people take a day off per week (me) and maybe a few hours spread across the week. Some people work half days 7 days a week. However you do it, there needs to be a time when you say "f this, I'm going to the movies." -Find your happy place, something that keeps you the you you were when you came in. I love working out. It gives me energy and I feel good. I stay healthy. I also love reading fiction, so sometimes I just curl up with a good book, work be damned. You have to give yourself permission to not think about work, at least for a couple of hours a week. You may also discover new hobbies! (I never worked out before I came to graduate school.) -Your work will creep into all aspects of your life, if you let it. This is why I hate unstructured time. You will feel guilty for not doing something, because in graduate school, there is ALWAYS something you can do. ALWAYS. But since there will always be more work, there's no harm in putting it aside for tomorrow, as long as you don't have a deadline. -You may need to reach outside of your cohort for a social life. None of my close friends are in my doctoral cohort. I've met master's students in my program, master's students in other programs, and I know a few non-graduate students I hang out with, too. Go to graduate student mixers. (If your university doesn't have any, organize some, if you like planning parties.) Join a student group that doesn't take up too much time. I had a doctoral acquaintance who kinda laughed at me because I joined some student groups other than the doctoral student one, and I was usually the only doctoral student in those groups, but I met some close friends (and future job contacts) and had a good time. -DO NOT FEEL GUILTY FOR WANTING A LIFE OUTSIDE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL. This is paramount. This is important. You are a well-rounded, complex, multifaceted human being. NEVER feel bad for this. Everybody wants some kind of life outside of work. Yes, you may loooove your field, but that doesn't mean you want to do it all day long. Some other doctoral students, and perhaps professors, may make you feel bad about this. Don't let them. Just smile and nod. Then disappear when you need to. Career: -This is job preparation. Remember that from Day One. Always be looking for ways to enhance your skills. Read job ads and find out what's hot in your field, what's necessary, what's in demand. For example, in my field statistics and methods are a hot commodity, and they're not a passing fad. I happen to really like statistics and methods, so I have pursued that as a concentration of mine. -Don't be afraid to take on volunteer work and part-time gigs that will give you skills that will be useful both inside academia and out, as long as it's not against your contract. Your adviser may be against it, but he doesn't have to know as long as it doesn't interfere with your work. -If you want to work outside of academia - if you are even *considering* the possibility - please please definitely do the above. Even if you aren't considering it, consider the possibility that you won't get a tenure-track job out the box and that you may need to support yourself doing something else for a while. You will have to prove to employers that you have developed usable, useful skills and this is one of the easiest ways to do it. But don't overdo it - get the degree done. -For more academic related ones - always look for opportunities to present and publish. Presentations look good on your CV. Publications look better. When you write seminar papers, wonder if you can publish them with some revision. Write your seminar papers on what you maybe think you may want to do your dissertation on. Even if you look at them three years later and think "these suck," you can at least glean some useful references and pieces from them. Discuss publication with your adviser early and often, and if you have the time and desire, seek out publication options with other professors and researchers. But if you commit to a project, COMMIT. You don't want to leave a bad impression. -If you can afford it, occasionally go to conferences even if you aren't presenting. You can network, and you can hear some interesting talks, and you may think about new directions for your own research. You can also meet people who may tell you about jobs, money, opportunities, etc. -Always try to get someone else to pay for conference travel before you come out of pocket. Including your adviser. Do not be shy about asking if he or she can pay. If he can't, he'll just say no. Usually the department has a travel fund for students, but often it's only if you are presenting. -If you are interested in academia, you should get some teaching experience. There are two traditional ways to do this: TAing a course, and teaching as a sole instructor. If you can help it, I wouldn't recommend doing a sole instructor position until you are finished with coursework. Teaching takes a LOT of time to do right. You should definitely TA at least one course, and probably a few different ones. But don't overdo it, if you can help it, because again, it takes a LOT of time. More than you expect at the outset. If you are in the humanities, I think sole instructor positions are very important for nabbing jobs so when you are in the exam/ABD phase, you may want to try at least one. If your own university has none, look at adjuncting for nearby colleges, including community colleges. (I would wager that the majority of natural science/physical science students, and most social science students, have never sole taught a class before they get an assistant professor job. At least, it's not that common n my field, which straddles the social and natural sciences.) -Always look for money. Money is awesome. If you can fund yourself you can do what you want, within reason. Your university will be thrilled, your adviser will be happy, and you can put it on your CV. It's win-win-win! Don't put yourself out of the running before anyone else has a chance to. Apply even if you think you won't get it or the odds are against you (they always are), as long as you are eligible. Apply often. Apply even if it's only $500. (That's conference travel!) Money begets money. The more awards you get, the more awards you will get. They will get bigger over time. If you are in the sciences and social sciences, you should get practice writing at least one grant. You don't have to write the whole thing, but at least get in on the process so that you can see how it's done. Grant-writing is very valuable both in and outside of graduate school. -Revise your CV every so often. Then look and decide what you want to add to it. Then go get that thing, so you can add it. -The career office at big universities is often not just for undergrads. I was surprised to learn that my career center offers help on CV organization and the academic job search, as well as alternative/non-academic career searches for doctoral students. In fact, there are two people whose sole purpose it is to help PhD students find nonacademic careers, and they both have PhDs. This will vary by university - some universities will have very little for grad students. Find out before you write the office off. -It's never too early to go to seminars/workshops like "the academic job search inside and out", "creating the perfect CV," "getting the job," etc. NEVER. Often the leader will share tips that are more aimed towards early graduate students, or tidbits that are kind of too late for more advanced students to take care of. This will also help you keep a pulse on what's hot in your field. It'll help you know what lines you need to add to your CV. And they're interesting. Other: -Decide ahead of time what you are NOT willing to sacrifice on the altar of academia. Then stick to it. I'm serious. If you decide that you do NOT want to sacrifice your relationship, don't. If it's your geographical mobility, don't. I mean, be realistic, and realize that there will always be trade-offs. But you have to think about what's important to you for your quality of life, and realize that there is always more to you than graduate school. -If you don't want to be a professor, do not feel guilty about this. At all. Zero. However, you will have to do things differently than most doctoral students. Your adviser will probably never have worked outside of the academy (although this may vary depending on the field) so he may or may not be able to help you. But you have a special mission to seek out the kinds of experiences that will help you find a non-academic job. Test the waters with your adviser before you tell him this. My adviser was quite amenable to it, but that's because I told him that my goal was to still do research and policy work in my field just not at a university, AND because it's quite common in my field for doctoral students to do non-academic work. If you're in a field where it's not common (or where your professors refuse to believe it's common, or it's not supposed to be common)…well, you may be a little more on your own. -Every so often, you will need to reflect on the reasons you came to graduate school. Sometimes, just sit and think quietly. Why are you doing this to yourself? Do you love your field? Do you need this degree to do what you want to do? Usually the answer is yes and yes, and usually you'll keep on trucking. But sometimes when the chips are down you will need to reevaluate why you put yourself through this in the first place. -To my great dismay, depression is quite common in doctoral students. Graduate work can be isolating and stressful. Luckily your health insurance usually includes counseling sessions. TAKE THEM if you need them. Do not be ashamed. You may be surprised with who else is getting them. (I found out that everyone in my cohort, including me, was getting mental health counseling at a certain point.) Exercise can help, as can taking that mental health day once a week and just chilling. Don't be surprised if you get the blues… -…but be self-aware and able to recognize when the depression is clouding your ability to function. Doctoral programs have a 50% attrition rate, and this is rarely because that 50% is less intelligent than, less motivated than, less driven than, or less ambitious than the other 50% that stays. Often they realize that they are ridiculously unhappy in the field, or that they don't need the degree anymore, or that they'd rather focus on other things in life, or their interests have changed. All of this is okay! -You will, at some point, be like "eff this, I'm leaving." I think almost every doctoral student has thought about dropping out and just kicking this all to the curb. You need to listen to yourself, and find out whether it is idle thought (nothing to worry about, very normal) or whether you are truly unhappy to the point that you need to leave. Counseling can help you figure this out. -Don't be afraid to take a semester or a year off if you need to. That's what leaves of absence are for. Lastly, and positively… …graduate school is great! Seriously, when else will you ever have the time to study what you want for hours on end, talk to just as interested others about it, and live in an intellectual community of scholars and intellectuals? And occasionally wake up at 11 am and go to the bank at 2 pm? Sometimes you will want to pull out all of your hair but most of the time, you will feel fulfilled and wonderfully encouraged and edified. So enjoy this time!
  13. 27 points
    Rani13

    2020 Applicants

    That would be me. My first acceptance and I’m thrilled.
  14. 27 points
    WildeThing

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Officially going to UVA! Thanks to everyone who has helped with advice, information, and just generally making this community the supportive place it is. I've been here for 3 years now and I'm glad to be moving on to the next stage finally.
  15. 26 points
  16. 25 points
  17. 24 points
    Hi everyone! I just wanted to offer some encouragement during this super stressful, ridiculous process. This is my third time applying for programs. The first time, fresh out of undergrad but feeling lucky, I applied to 5 PhD programs. Got waitlisted at one (which I'm confident was an accident) and was rejected from all the others. On a whim and literally while in my Social Psych class, I applied to a Clinical Psych Masters program and got in with a full assistantship! I figured I'd get more experience and try again. Second time, during my Masters, I was feeling super confident and prepared and awesome with all this experience I'd gotten, so I applied to 11 places to cast a wide net and waited for the invites to come flooding in. Spoiler alert: they didn't. I got one interview and was promptly rejected. Oof. This time, I'm a research coordinator at Cincinnati Children's Hospital with even more experience, and basically have to get in this time if I don't want to retake the GRE again (I DO NOT). I applied to 10 schools and, as of right now, have 4 interviews, 3 of which are at my top 3 choices. I'm still waiting to hear back from one more school, so at this point I'm feelin' straight up okay. All of this isn't to say that I'm some expert or anything because I obviously don't have any offers yet and for all I know I could be in for round 4 🙃 but I just want to say this: let's be honest, your timeline may not be what you imagined it to be. Mine definitely wasn't; I turned 26 yesterday and I thought I'd be almost done with my PhD by now. But that doesn't mean that what we want won't happen for us. It just may mean that the path to get there takes a few unexpected turns. Let's keep our heads up, maybe have an extra glass of wine, and try to be as kind and encouraging to ourselves as we are to each other. ☺️ Edit: This came out VERY cheesy, my b. Basically: even if it doesn't happen this time, that doesn't mean it won't next time. We're all smart, qualified, freaking cool people.
  18. 24 points
    Anyone else want to get their rejections so they can move on with their life? 😂
  19. 24 points
    dilby

    2019 Decisions Thread

    I couldn't have put it better myself. I just accepted my offer at Yale — see you in New Haven?
  20. 24 points
    Bopie5

    2019 Applicants

    Friends!!! I just had a paper on dynamics of embodied race in Kate Chopin's "Desiree's Baby" accepted for publication in an undergraduate research journal! I am OVER THE MOON! My first academic publication!
  21. 24 points
  22. 23 points
    MichelleObama

    2020 Applicants

    IN AT YALE!!! IM GOING TO LOSE MY MIND I DON'T KNOW WHO I AM ANYMORE
  23. 23 points
    So I think I will propose research to see the prevalence of psychiatric disorders caused by PhD application process.
  24. 23 points
    I’m thinking of pulling a “George” & just showing up on interview day at my #1 school & acting like I was invited.
  25. 23 points
    Anyone else's brain like: "omg its Jan 2- the holidays are over please read my application now!!!" Two weeks from now, a lot of us will be hearing some great news! I know it's hard to stay positive but as an over achiever who was rejected by all the universities I applied to last year, I promise you that whatever happens, you will be okay. If anyone needs someone to talk to and confide in my DMs are always open :). Wishing you all success in this new year and please remember that you all are applying to literally the hardest graduate program in the country.
  26. 23 points
    Hi everyone, 1st year clinical (Ph.D.) student here. I remember being in your place around this time last year (and several years before that), and found myself reminiscing how awful all those feelings were during “application” season. The uncertainty, checking my emails at all hours of the day, comparing my stats; background/experiences to other equally competitive applicants, refreshing the stupid forums and invites pages at every minute- ALL of it. It took me 3 application rounds to finally be accepted, at my “dream” institution, with a PI who I “dreamed” of working with (For reference: I was rejected from this school during previous application rounds). All of this to say: This process isn’t easy. It’s unfair, it isn’t for the weak. However, the field is slowly changing, especially for applicants from less privileged backgrounds. Clinical Psychology has a lot of room for growth (and revamping this difficult, confusing, and oftentimes unfair application process should be a goal for the CUDCP). Regardless of the outcome this application season: Please do not give up. If this is what you want to do for the rest of your life, you will get in. Do not let a lack of interview invite or rejection from a program define your self-worth/potential. Remember to practice self-kindness, and understand that there are a lot (unfair) factors at play that are out of your control as an applicant. I’m happy to chat and give words of encouragement for those who need it. I met some awesome folks this past Spring during my interview process (and on here!) and I am forever grateful for that. I’m thinking of you all during this difficult time and process. — a seasoned applicant who went through this BS misery, multiple rounds.
  27. 23 points
    kendalldinniene

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Dallas bound y’all!
  28. 22 points
    MichelleObama

    2020 Applicants

    In at Cornell!!!
  29. 22 points
    Holy sh*t, I'm in at Yale!
  30. 22 points
    On behalf of everyone who applied this year I would just like to say, "AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!" That is all.
  31. 21 points
    meghan_sparkle

    2020 Acceptances

    In at Yale with the kindest email I've ever read from the DGS oh my god
  32. 21 points
    Kendall1234

    PhD Applicants: Fall 2020

    Ahhhh! I got into UCLA’s HPM program! I am beyond thrilled. I was getting SO nervous. This is my THIRD time applying to doctoral programs and I’ve been working in research for 8 years. YAY!
  33. 21 points
    MDMS2020

    PhD Applicants: Fall 2020

    After four rejections in a row, received a Yes from Brown!
  34. 21 points
    meghan_sparkle

    2020 Acceptances

    I was just about to go to bed and I got into UC Berkeley 😭 EDIT: Just noticed the line: "The Berkeley English Department has nominated you for a prestigious university fellowship; as soon as we know the outcome of that nomination, I will be back in touch to clarify the offer." WHAT??! WHAT!
  35. 21 points
    Me, trying to remind myself that I’m not complete trash after dealing with this stress the last few weeks:
  36. 21 points
    I'm just going to leave this here
  37. 21 points
    Hi all, I wanted to start a thread to allow us all to share our thoughts and reflect on this application cycle now that it is almost over. This was my second time applying to Counseling Psychology programs, and I know that I have learned a lot about myself (and the ridiculous admissions game) through this process. To give you a bit of background, my first application cycle, I applied to 6 programs (all CounPsy) and though I had a mix of preliminary and in-person interviews for 4 of them, I was eventually rejected from all. I was devastated, and literally had mental breakdowns every few days. So, I really understand the struggle of having to wait, but never getting the news you want. This time, I applied to 17 programs (yeah I know, it is a lot!). I interviewed at 9 - one of them being a School Psychology Ph.D. program - and out of those, ultimately was rejected from 1, waitlisted at 1, and received offers from 7. Based on my experience, I want to share a few thoughts and pieces of advice: Rejections do not determine your self-worth. Please do not feel like you are not qualified/smart/unique enough if you did not get in. I say this because my first time applying was last year, and I have not really gained any more relevant experience since then. I didn’t even change my personal statement besides 2-3 sentences. I improved my interview skills a little bit, but the big difference was where I applied. Which brings me to #2. Last time, I was picky about location/perfect fit. This time, I chose to apply to places where I would actually bring something new to the lab/POI, and I was flexible about location as well. You might think “I would never go here”, but sometimes the interview will change your mind. That happened to me with multiple programs this time. So my advice for both new applicants and applicants who are applying again, is that do not be stuck to one area if it’s possible. Of course, family/partner relocation and finance might be something you have to consider with this. Submit apps early! I submitted materials a month in advance in case I missed anything. Of course, if this is not financially possible for you, then try to review the checklist of materials for each school multiple times. This will give you enough of an idea to fix something if needed. If you can’t afford to interview in person, don’t. Out of my 9 interviews, I did 6 over Skype/phone (although one of them didn’t have in person interviews). I was accepted to 5/6 of the programs I interviewed at on Skype, and 2/3 for the ones in-person. In fact, one of the programs strongly discouraged Skype interviews, and still ended up accepting me in the first round. This goes to show that your interviewing skills can sometimes matter more than your in-person presence. And if you do get in, you can always visit during dates that are more convenient/cost-effective as well. Be proud of yourself for completing and submitting your applications. That is a difficult task in itself. If you got to the interview stage, congratulations on that as well. No matter what the result, don’t give up on your dream of getting a Ph.D. I hope this reflection can be insightful to folks in some way. If you would like to ask any questions, I’d be happy to answer! It would be awesome if all of the wonderful Ph.D. applicants out here could share their reflections as well I’m sure you all could bring much more to this conversation!
  38. 21 points
    WildeThing

    2019 Acceptances

    Accepted off the waitlist at UVA! I can hardly believe it, I was sure it wasn't going to happen. If there any people who went to the visit, or who are current or ex students, please DM me! I'd like to ask some questions about the area and there's not really a lot of time to wait for responses through the regular channels.
  39. 21 points
    FiguresIII

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Yale Comp Lit!
  40. 21 points
    swarthmawr

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Headed to Rutgers!
  41. 21 points
    sad_diamond

    2019 Decisions Thread

    Just accepted Penn's offer!
  42. 21 points
    As an update for the folks who helped me (and for future applicants who may be in my situation): I got a full-time job as a research coordinator in an extremely productive lab at an amazing institution (which I frankly didn't think I had a shot at getting into). I'm honestly more excited about this "acceptance" than the three non-funded PsyD acceptances I had earlier this year, which really solidifies 1) the fact that I'm passionate about research, and 2) that I've made the right choice by declining offers and planning to reapply to PhD programs in a few years. Yaaaay
  43. 21 points
    Matthew3957

    2019 Acceptances

    I finally had the call with UCSC and am so happy to say I've been accepted!! I should have known with the email saying they wanted to talk, but with how the season has gone I had so much doubt. I am ecstatic!
  44. 20 points
    karamazov

    2020 Acceptances

    Found out this afternoon that I'm in at Penn State!! I was nearly crying when I got off the phone with the DGS. I am still in shock.
  45. 20 points
    Me thinking about the schools I applied to
  46. 20 points
    Bopie5

    2019 Applicants

    In further craziness, I just had a paper on Frankenstein accepted for presentation at a conference on the Gothic! I’m shook! I didn’t think I would get accepted and I only applied for practice writing abstracts. It feels really good to be already be building my app for next cycle if I don’t get into Villanova.
  47. 20 points
    Geez, this thread went from high anxiety generating to deeply toxic. Feels good that I avoided the forums this time around. My condolences to all the real humans that had to sit through the toxic troll fest. Good luck with the arduous path of an academic life for those who will be starting the PhD this year, and my best wishes to those who will try again with applications next year around. I applied to 12 programs last year, and got rejected from all. This time around I applied to 10, and got accepted to 2 programs ranked in the 10s and 2 programs ranked in the 30s. I am really excited about this, especially given that I got into one of my dream schools! Amazing things can happen...
  48. 20 points
    eddyrynes

    2019 Acceptances

    GOT ACCEPTED AT UPENN! I'm still in disbelief. Got a phone call from the DGS, so seems like UPenn isn't closed today after all?
  49. 19 points
    pinkfruit

    2020 Acceptances

    Acceptance from Duke's Literature program! 😳
  50. 19 points
    A very accomplished PI said something to me at a holiday party that has really resonated with me and hopefully will help others as well. I was discussing how I couldn't wait to get into a program and finally start my career/life. He stopped me and said no, you've already started. This is the early stages of your career. You are succeeding now, working as a research assistant, building a solid CV. The next step is a PhD, but it's not the beginning. So, friends. You've already started. You're well on your way! Hope you all had a lovely holiday 🙂


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