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Sarah Bee

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  1. Downvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from YAO ZHAO in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  2. Downvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Mechanician2015 in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  3. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from TeaOverCoffee in How to Start a SOP   
    Passionate hook and motivation Background Research interests Why applying to a particular programme Why applying to a particular university How the programme shapes your future plan Read it somewhere, and though I followed the pattern, I couldn't make  my SoP as intriguing and engaging as it should have been!
  4. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from gk210 in Your Favorite Words That Mean Something Specific In Your Field   
    There are plenty of them but here are a few:
    Air: White space used in a story design Armpit: An awkward-looking page layout where a story's banner headline sits on top of a photo or another headline Bastard measure: Any non-standard width for a column of text Bleed: A page element that extends to the trimmed edge of a printed page Doglegs:  L-shaped columns of text that wrap around art, ads or other stories Ear: Text or graphic elements on either side of a newspaper's flag Gutter: narrow margin of white space in the center area in a magazine, newspaper, or book, where two pages meet Hammer head:  A headline that uses a big, bold word or phrase for impact and runs a small, wide deck below Morgue: newsroom library Orphan: A short word or phrase that's carried over to a new column or page Pork chop: A half-column mug shot. Teaser:   An eye-catching graphic element, on Page One or section fronts, that promotes an item inside; also called a promo. Widow:  A word or phrase that makes up the last line of text in a paragraph
  5. Downvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from nugget in What’s the deal with MOOCs?   
    If you aren’t familiar, Coursera is one of the leading providers of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), along with Udacity and edX. MOOCs are a way for Universities to put their entire curriculum for a given course — lectures, problem sets, texts and more — online for anyone to learn, using video and web-based testing. Many have called MOOCs a revolution in education, and with millions of students enrolling — many from India, Brazil and other low-income nations — it is clear that they are here to stay. There are three big challenges for MOOC providers. First, the most obvious, how do they make money on these free courses? Second, perhaps equally important, how can they allow students to prove the knowledge that they have gained, when there is no accredited diploma? Finally, how can they manage cheating in an online world where stealing answers is as easy as opening a new instant message window?
    Coursera hopes to help solve these problems with their new certification program, called “Signature Track“.
    How does it work? So let’s say you enroll in a free Coursera course. After you enroll and the class has begun, you have about 3 weeks to decide that you want to be in the “Signature Track”, which provides proof of course completion as well as a grade on how well you performed. If you decide that you want to go with the Signature Track option, you have to take a few steps.
    Pay between $30-$100 (depending on the course). Submit a recognized ID such as your drivers license as well as take a picture of yourself via webcam. This gives Coursera a way to verify that you are who you say you are. Type a short writing sample, which allows them to use your “keystroke” signature like a fingerprint of sorts. They ask you to repeat this typing sample after each test — so they can be reasonably sure it was you who took the test. After these steps, you continue taking your course, taking tests, and getting grades. Once you’ve completed the course and have your grades, you can then share your detailed course performance with employers via a web-based interface. Currently only 5 courses work on Signature Track, but Coursera wants to upgrade the majority of their 200+ courses by the end of the year.
    What’s a Coursera Certificate Worth? This is a bit more complicated.
    At the end of the day, students enroll in courses to learn knowledge that will help them get ahead — get a better job or get a promotion. To be crude, to earn more money. That’s why college has usually offered among the best returns on investment of nearly anything that anyone can buy. You spend money to get a degree, then you use that degree to make more money – it’s proven that a bachelors degree has a net present value of about $450,000.
    With that said, the value of a Coursera Certificate can be measured in a few ways – either its value towards an accredited degree or its stand-alone value to employers.
    Since we are really just looking at the value of the Certificate, we can ignore the fact that taking a course certainly has inherent value — you will have more knowledge inside your brain afterwards than you did before. But again, that’s being offered for free already. We are merely talking about what the value to this new $30-$100 product is to your ability to make more money.
    Lets take them one at a time:
    How many credits (from an accredited institution) can I exchange the Coursera Certificate for towards a degree? Coursera is working with the American Council on Education (ACE) to ensure that credits that come from the Signature Track program will be honored by many of ACE’s 1,800 member schools, such as Amherst University, Boston University, Carnegie Mellon and many others. Last week, ACE said that they would recommend to their member schools that they offer 2 – 3 credits per completed Signature Track course.
    However, even as ACE has recommended it, it is likely that only a portion of these schools – those with lesser reputations – will honor these credits, at least at first. Adoption will take place on a university-by-university basis, and for any given institution its unclear right now ifor when it will happen. Right now the answer is: Your Coursera Certificate cannot be exchanged for any credits from any accredited institution. After ACE’s announcement, we can expect this answer will change within weeks or months.
    How many credits (from an accredited institution) can I earn by using the knowledge that I gained from the Coursera course towards a degree? When you first arrive at college, most schools will allow you to test out of certain introductory level classes, which allows you to earn credits by proving that you have mastery of that particular subject — likely saving you thousands of dollars.
    There is also the prior learning assessment (PLA), a more formal method of testing out,where a collegiate institution agrees that a course you took is worth a specific amount of credits by using your portfolio to determine your prior learnings, or requiring standardized test to prove said knowledge. In either of these cases, the school gives you an opportunity to earn credits for previously learned knowledge. PLAs are still quite new and while colleges are beginning to accept it, it is rare to find a top college that allows you to gain credits in this way. Still, PLAs are gaining, and it’s only a matter of time before they are more widely accepted. That said, today, PLAs are limited to community colleges and the lowest tier of universities – and none have announced that they will accept Coursera Certificates as of yet.
    How will employers value my Coursera Certificate? Will it enable me to apply for better jobs, or get interviews I wouldn’t be able to get otherwise? And this, my friends, is the million dollar question, and one that cannot be answered here because its entirely based on a set of millions of changing, morphing opinions by hiring managers, executives and business owners.
    That said, here is what we do know: there is some agreement that MOOCs can provide similar value to taking a course in an in-person setting, as several universities arealready enrolling their students in MOOCs, with these students taking their tests in a standard proctored environment. There is also widespread agreement, at least among engineering or technical subjects, that MOOC-style courses can deliver similar, or the same, knowledge and expertise as the normal college experience. Where this falls apart is in three areas:
    First, employers value predictability. Many companies have continued to recruit at the same colleges for years, with an understanding of what it means to hire a Cornell or a Boston University graduate. That reputation shifts over time, but it is still a predictable, known variable. As more MOOC students apply for, and are accepted into jobs, they will become the standard bearers for their institution. As a result, Coursera has a lot riding on their first few “classes” of graduates — they will be the first ones to solidify what it means to be a “Coursera Graduate”, even if that shifts dramatically in their first decade as they are still experimenting.
    Second, a major problem facing MOOC students is that the prevalence (and ease) of online cheating makes it very hard to trust the grades that students receive in their courses. Although this can be a problem for brick and mortar universities, it is far greater of an issue for online only schools. Signature Track is perhaps the most significant step that the Coursera Certificate takes — it enables some level of proctoring to reduce (or eliminate) cheating — and all Coursera students will benefit from this.
    And finally, there is hesitancy to recognize the value of courses that stress interpersonal skills that are hard to replicate online: team-based project work, communications, presentation skills and creativity. Certain majors like Sales/Marketing, Political Science, Advanced Engineering (that require teamwork and projects) and more, will have a hard time filling ranks with students that spent their time in virtual classrooms. This is likely to be a problem until MOOCs gain tools to replicate these experiences — likely a lot farther away.
    What does this mean for you? So the answer is that right now, employers are utterly confused and unclear about the value of a Coursera Certificate. That will likely change within 3-5 years, or even sooner if Coursera has a really good PR team. At the moment though, don’t expect your Coursera Certificate to get you an interview at Google!
    Source: http://www.skilledup.com/blog/coursera-certificate-whats-it-worth/
  6. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to spellbanisher in Your Favorite Words That Mean Something Specific In Your Field   
    History is not a synonym for the "past." The past is what happened. History is an interpretation of the past or an argument about it.
  7. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Inka dreams in What’s the deal with MOOCs?   
    If you aren’t familiar, Coursera is one of the leading providers of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), along with Udacity and edX. MOOCs are a way for Universities to put their entire curriculum for a given course — lectures, problem sets, texts and more — online for anyone to learn, using video and web-based testing. Many have called MOOCs a revolution in education, and with millions of students enrolling — many from India, Brazil and other low-income nations — it is clear that they are here to stay. There are three big challenges for MOOC providers. First, the most obvious, how do they make money on these free courses? Second, perhaps equally important, how can they allow students to prove the knowledge that they have gained, when there is no accredited diploma? Finally, how can they manage cheating in an online world where stealing answers is as easy as opening a new instant message window?
    Coursera hopes to help solve these problems with their new certification program, called “Signature Track“.
    How does it work? So let’s say you enroll in a free Coursera course. After you enroll and the class has begun, you have about 3 weeks to decide that you want to be in the “Signature Track”, which provides proof of course completion as well as a grade on how well you performed. If you decide that you want to go with the Signature Track option, you have to take a few steps.
    Pay between $30-$100 (depending on the course). Submit a recognized ID such as your drivers license as well as take a picture of yourself via webcam. This gives Coursera a way to verify that you are who you say you are. Type a short writing sample, which allows them to use your “keystroke” signature like a fingerprint of sorts. They ask you to repeat this typing sample after each test — so they can be reasonably sure it was you who took the test. After these steps, you continue taking your course, taking tests, and getting grades. Once you’ve completed the course and have your grades, you can then share your detailed course performance with employers via a web-based interface. Currently only 5 courses work on Signature Track, but Coursera wants to upgrade the majority of their 200+ courses by the end of the year.
    What’s a Coursera Certificate Worth? This is a bit more complicated.
    At the end of the day, students enroll in courses to learn knowledge that will help them get ahead — get a better job or get a promotion. To be crude, to earn more money. That’s why college has usually offered among the best returns on investment of nearly anything that anyone can buy. You spend money to get a degree, then you use that degree to make more money – it’s proven that a bachelors degree has a net present value of about $450,000.
    With that said, the value of a Coursera Certificate can be measured in a few ways – either its value towards an accredited degree or its stand-alone value to employers.
    Since we are really just looking at the value of the Certificate, we can ignore the fact that taking a course certainly has inherent value — you will have more knowledge inside your brain afterwards than you did before. But again, that’s being offered for free already. We are merely talking about what the value to this new $30-$100 product is to your ability to make more money.
    Lets take them one at a time:
    How many credits (from an accredited institution) can I exchange the Coursera Certificate for towards a degree? Coursera is working with the American Council on Education (ACE) to ensure that credits that come from the Signature Track program will be honored by many of ACE’s 1,800 member schools, such as Amherst University, Boston University, Carnegie Mellon and many others. Last week, ACE said that they would recommend to their member schools that they offer 2 – 3 credits per completed Signature Track course.
    However, even as ACE has recommended it, it is likely that only a portion of these schools – those with lesser reputations – will honor these credits, at least at first. Adoption will take place on a university-by-university basis, and for any given institution its unclear right now ifor when it will happen. Right now the answer is: Your Coursera Certificate cannot be exchanged for any credits from any accredited institution. After ACE’s announcement, we can expect this answer will change within weeks or months.
    How many credits (from an accredited institution) can I earn by using the knowledge that I gained from the Coursera course towards a degree? When you first arrive at college, most schools will allow you to test out of certain introductory level classes, which allows you to earn credits by proving that you have mastery of that particular subject — likely saving you thousands of dollars.
    There is also the prior learning assessment (PLA), a more formal method of testing out,where a collegiate institution agrees that a course you took is worth a specific amount of credits by using your portfolio to determine your prior learnings, or requiring standardized test to prove said knowledge. In either of these cases, the school gives you an opportunity to earn credits for previously learned knowledge. PLAs are still quite new and while colleges are beginning to accept it, it is rare to find a top college that allows you to gain credits in this way. Still, PLAs are gaining, and it’s only a matter of time before they are more widely accepted. That said, today, PLAs are limited to community colleges and the lowest tier of universities – and none have announced that they will accept Coursera Certificates as of yet.
    How will employers value my Coursera Certificate? Will it enable me to apply for better jobs, or get interviews I wouldn’t be able to get otherwise? And this, my friends, is the million dollar question, and one that cannot be answered here because its entirely based on a set of millions of changing, morphing opinions by hiring managers, executives and business owners.
    That said, here is what we do know: there is some agreement that MOOCs can provide similar value to taking a course in an in-person setting, as several universities arealready enrolling their students in MOOCs, with these students taking their tests in a standard proctored environment. There is also widespread agreement, at least among engineering or technical subjects, that MOOC-style courses can deliver similar, or the same, knowledge and expertise as the normal college experience. Where this falls apart is in three areas:
    First, employers value predictability. Many companies have continued to recruit at the same colleges for years, with an understanding of what it means to hire a Cornell or a Boston University graduate. That reputation shifts over time, but it is still a predictable, known variable. As more MOOC students apply for, and are accepted into jobs, they will become the standard bearers for their institution. As a result, Coursera has a lot riding on their first few “classes” of graduates — they will be the first ones to solidify what it means to be a “Coursera Graduate”, even if that shifts dramatically in their first decade as they are still experimenting.
    Second, a major problem facing MOOC students is that the prevalence (and ease) of online cheating makes it very hard to trust the grades that students receive in their courses. Although this can be a problem for brick and mortar universities, it is far greater of an issue for online only schools. Signature Track is perhaps the most significant step that the Coursera Certificate takes — it enables some level of proctoring to reduce (or eliminate) cheating — and all Coursera students will benefit from this.
    And finally, there is hesitancy to recognize the value of courses that stress interpersonal skills that are hard to replicate online: team-based project work, communications, presentation skills and creativity. Certain majors like Sales/Marketing, Political Science, Advanced Engineering (that require teamwork and projects) and more, will have a hard time filling ranks with students that spent their time in virtual classrooms. This is likely to be a problem until MOOCs gain tools to replicate these experiences — likely a lot farther away.
    What does this mean for you? So the answer is that right now, employers are utterly confused and unclear about the value of a Coursera Certificate. That will likely change within 3-5 years, or even sooner if Coursera has a really good PR team. At the moment though, don’t expect your Coursera Certificate to get you an interview at Google!
    Source: http://www.skilledup.com/blog/coursera-certificate-whats-it-worth/
  8. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Crucial BBQ in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  9. Downvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from ahlatsiawa in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  10. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted in Thanks to Gradcafe...   
    You're welcome.
  11. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Queen of Kale in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  12. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Secret_Ninja in popular things you hate   
    Game of thrones
  13. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from Z4Zebra in Sh*t people say when you are applying to grad school   
    lol yeah and I come from a very traditional set up wherein girls are married off before they hit 25. It's kind of like I rebelled and broke the established norms and on top of that, I am planning to fly to an alien country completely unaided for a better career. I guess, deep down, people are jealous and envious of others' success, and since they cannot say anything positive about you, they find it necessary to pass snide or demeaning comments to bring you down.  
  14. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from DigDeep(inactive) in The Pet Thread   
    Those ears! <3
  15. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to gellert in When do you feel like you matured?   
    I'm 25, and I think I didn't grow up until I was 23 in terms of adult activities.  At 23 I was on my own, paying 100% of my own bills with no parent bailouts ... which is something when you have a genetic disease that hospitalizes you frequently and really racks up the medical bills.  But once I started paying my own bills, having to make my own budgets (and follow them!), care about my credit score, buy a car and auto insurance, etc., I started to feel like I was an actual adult.  To an extent I'm still reliant on my parents for emotional support because I call them quite often, but that's mostly because we have been through a lot together and I see them as friends and allies in many ways.  While for some people calling their parents daily = immature, for me it's not an object.
     
    In terms of emotional maturity, I think I grew up when I was 20 and had a really bad exacerbation of my genetic condition.  I had to take years off of school after that and went through a lot of very difficult hospitalizations and 20 was about the point when I think I started to solidify my personality and become the kind of person I considered mature.  This was not entirely due to the hospitalizations, tbf.  But I think I started to piece things together more.  I started not letting myself get away with flimsy excuses for my behavior; I took responsibility for myself and held myself accountable.
     
    tl;dr, I think self-responsibility is what makes someone mature.  And there are two kinds of responsibility: the pragmatic kind (paying bills, etc.) and the emotional/psychological kind.  They happen at different points for everyone.  Believe me, I know plenty of people who are responsible with their bills, but I would never trust them with my heart.  And just as many people who I trust to be honest and sincere and so on, but I'd never ask them to so much as water my plants for me.
     
    (edited to preserve anonymity; said genetic disease is rare enough to excuse me not specifying it)
  16. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to spectastic in The Pet Thread   
    Buddy Junior at 3-4 months old. I didn't notice he used to have green eyes. And that grease stain on his nose from getting friendly with my bike chain.
  17. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to sarab in The Pet Thread   
    Spectastic, I love your cats!
     
    I took this one of one of my cats last night, and I think it's worth sharing
     

  18. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to spectastic in The Pet Thread   
    oh ok that makes sense haha. yes, buddy junior used to look like that when he was 3 months, and was just a ball of energy. now he's just a chubby fur ball who likes to jump on top of me when I sleep.
  19. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from sarab in The Pet Thread   
    lol that one is 8 months old right now, the pic was taken when it was 3 months old.
    And your cats are adorable!! I love those eyes <3
  20. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to DigDeep(inactive) in The Pet Thread   
    dawwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!
  21. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to sarab in The Pet Thread   
    OMG, Sarah Bee! They are so adorable <3 How old are they?
  22. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from DeafAudi in The Pet Thread   
    My babies, my life!! <3
     

     
    Taffy, a Persian cat
     

     
    Pusheen, Persian cross
  23. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to DeafAudi in The Pet Thread   
    Just thought I would add a photo of my baby! hehe. 
     

  24. Upvote
    Sarah Bee reacted to jmu in What were you doing when you got accepted?   
    When I got the unofficial notification I was sitting in a cafe upset about just being rejected by another program.
  25. Upvote
    Sarah Bee got a reaction from doingthings in Rejection woes.....   
    I just applied to two programmes. Imagine what I am going through. If one of them rejects me, it would be unimaginably tormenting for me to wait for the other one 
    And the decision from one of them is due in the second week of February 
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