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Sigaba

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  1. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to AP in Question about discussing other student's progress in the lab with advisor   
    I don't think it's up to you to decide how someone's writing should or shouldn't be at "this stage of her career." This is not to say you shouldn't do anything. As a colleague, you should approach the other student and politely have a conversation with her (while probably suggesting possible resources, like a writing center on campus). Writing is a an uneven skill that not everyone masters at the same pace or in the same way. 
    I've been in your colleague's shoes, writing not so well. I benefited from a fellow grad student pointing out "silly" but overtly huge mistakes. Today we send each other drafts all the time because we trust we are honest, thorough, and kind. 
  2. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from Pierre de Olivi in Self plagiarism? Ethical question.   
    Your best bet would be to consult your institution's guidelines/rules on academic integrity. If you read something that clearly states that your plan is okay, you're probably okay. If you don't find such clarity, you will want to reach out to the instructors of both classes to get their blessing.

    In the event either asks you "Why are you asking now?" --as opposed to weeks/months ago-- give them an honest answer "It hadn't occurred to you."

    If either says that your planned approach is not acceptable, try to ask for guidance on how to proceed.
  3. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to Artifex_Archer in Found a Tiny Standard Font and Feel Like I'm Cheating   
    Okay, take it easy. I appreciate both of your thoughts, and would refer you [non-snarkily] to the entirety of my post, in which I tried to clarify that, first, the font was still legible [no weird serif-y ish, and about the size of a Garamond 11/11.5]; second, that I was NOT trying to ‘trick’ anyone—that was precisely my reason for asking the question—and was still making cuts to fit the specified page requirement; and finally, I am aware that length limits exist for many reasons, most of them very good ones. 

    Now that the mostly playful collegial indignation is out of the way...
    To your point, I also should have clarified that I’m a theorist in the humanities. Many, though not all, of us can be a bit more loquacious than those in STEM disciplines. [Side note: that’s so cool that your son is a mathematical theorist! Do you mind my asking what he specializes in?]
     
    NB: Not that I meant to hurt anyone with my initial remark about being a theorist. It was self-deprecating, and I understand that that doesn’t always translate well over the ether. 
     
    I also should have clarified that I found Aparajita while playing around with different fonts for aesthetic reasons on an unrelated project. It was never part of some devious campaign to ‘own teh adcommz,’ or whatever. My general philosophy is that people should spend less time on that and more time on expressing themselves coherently and succinctly, as you point out.
     
    Finally, as an update, I did manage to make the necessary length cuts, and it’s a good thing, too, since while the Aparajita font is normal-looking, it translates to Arial [which is gnar-bar] on certain web portals. I checked just for giggles last night. So for anyone who’s reading this and IS interested in ‘tricks,’ [which I was not, and which I repeat since I consider this important and since I know people tend to scroll to the end of responses]: you don’t need them; and this ain’t one of them. 
  4. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to ashiepoo72 in 2020 application thread   
    Hello all, just dropping in to send you good vibes as deadlines approach! If anyone has questions about UC Davis, feel free to PM me  
  5. Downvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from andrew001237 in Mastering out of PhD - Need some Guidance!   
    Honor: "I will bear true faith and allegiance ..." Accordingly, we will: Conduct ourselves in the highest ethical manner in all relationships with peers, superiors and subordinates; Be honest and truthful in our dealings with each other, and with those outside the Navy; Be willing to make honest recommendations and accept those of junior personnel; Encourage new ideas and deliver the bad news, even when it is unpopular; Abide by an uncompromising code of integrity, taking responsibility for our actions and keeping our word; Fulfill or exceed our legal and ethical responsibilities in our public and personal lives twenty-four hours a day. Illegal or improper behavior or even the appearance of such behavior will not be tolerated. We are accountable for our professional and personal behavior. We will be mindful of the privilege to serve our fellow Americans.
    Courage: "I will support and defend ..." Accordingly, we will have: courage to meet the demands of our profession and the mission when it is hazardous, demanding, or otherwise difficult; Make decisions in the best interest of the navy and the nation, without regard to personal consequences; Meet these challenges while adhering to a higher standard of personal conduct and decency; Be loyal to our nation, ensuring the resources entrusted to us are used in an honest, careful, and efficient way. Courage is the value that gives us the moral and mental strength to do what is right, even in the face of personal or professional adversity.
    Commitment: "I will obey the orders ..." Accordingly, we will: Demand respect up and down the chain of command; Care for the safety, professional, personal and spiritual well-being of our people; Show respect toward all people without regard to race, religion, or gender; Treat each individual with human dignity; Be committed to positive change and constant improvement; Exhibit the highest degree of moral character, technical excellence, quality and competence in what we have been trained to do. The day-to-day duty of every Navy man and woman is to work together as a team to improve the quality of our work, our people and ourselves.
    These are the CORE VALUES of the United States Navy. https://www.navy.mil/navydata/nav_legacy.asp?id=193
  6. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to TMP in When to start looking at programs? When to start emailing professors?   
    In short: summer before for programs, mid-fall for professors.  And kindly use the search functions to see a variety of answers to your question.
  7. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to WildeThing in TA Experience   
    I don't think teaching experience matters at this stage. Their focus is to get good scholars, the teaching you do is supplementary to that. Same goes for administrative experience. These are things that will matter at the other end of the PhD process.
  8. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from Modulus in Was I wrong to help my professor   
    If you have such a conversation, please do remember remember that the best solution for the rep or the union is not automatically the best solution for you or the professional identity you want to build.
  9. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to Quickmick in Was I wrong to help my professor   
    It sounds like she might be more upset about the "unpaid" part than the actual helping? I second the possibility of overreacting...
  10. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from Nicator in 2020 application thread   
    Hi, @anbri 
    FWIW, I put my name in the upper right corner, with the document type after a colon. Like this. SIGABA: Statement of Purpose. And while I'm neither paranoid nor #OCD, I would number my as Page 1 of x, Page 2 of x, so that readers would understand if pages were missing.
     
     
  11. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from TMP in At a crossroads   
    Welcome to the GradCafe, @valley
    I recommend that you apply to at least one doctoral program (the University of Texas at Austin merits consideration) if you can write a strong statement of purpose in which you define your interests as a historian. No matter where you apply, do your best to find at least one common theme that ties your evolving interests together.
    From January through September, I recommend working on your German and diving into the deep end of modern German social history. Prepare yourself for pain. The going will be painful.
  12. Like
    Sigaba got a reaction from Adelaide9216 in Undergraduate events/student groups   
    Well said.
  13. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from LucasL in 2020 application thread   
    Hi, @anbri 
    FWIW, I put my name in the upper right corner, with the document type after a colon. Like this. SIGABA: Statement of Purpose. And while I'm neither paranoid nor #OCD, I would number my as Page 1 of x, Page 2 of x, so that readers would understand if pages were missing.
     
     
  14. Like
    Sigaba got a reaction from anbri in 2020 application thread   
    Hi, @anbri 
    FWIW, I put my name in the upper right corner, with the document type after a colon. Like this. SIGABA: Statement of Purpose. And while I'm neither paranoid nor #OCD, I would number my as Page 1 of x, Page 2 of x, so that readers would understand if pages were missing.
     
     
  15. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to Indecisive Poet in UCSB - 10 page writing sample?   
    I think this is a bad idea. My understanding is that it's usually perfectly fine to go under the limit but never to go over. It might suggest to them that you haven't read their website or that you can't follow instructions – but worse, they will probably stop reading after page 10, especially because other applicants will have followed instructions.
    Can you condense your paper to 10 pages and talk about the paper in your statement of purpose? You could use a few sentences there to explain that it's an excerpt and discuss how the full paper fit within current scholarship in your field.
  16. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to AP in 2020 application thread   
    I agree. Some faculty might be on leave or simply busy. You can reach out to them, politely. I'd also suggest contacting the DGS and/or graduate students. The DGS will give you an idea of the program and graduate students will tell you how the program "really" is. 
    Additionally, @LucasL from foreigner to foreigner, I would run your e-mails by someone before sending them. I doubt this is the case, but you want to make sure you are writing them according to the way it's done here. I learned the hard way there is a format of formality that professors expect. 
    Good luck!
  17. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to OHSP in 2020 application thread   
    I strongly advise against this as a policy--some professors receive an enormous number of emails from prospective students, as well as managing classes, current students, whatever else they have going on in their lives etc. People who did not respond to my emails while I was applying have turned out to be great advisors. Given your interests I would think more carefully about nyu.
  18. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to NowMoreSerious in Recommenders - better that they know you well than that they have a better position?   
    I think if you have two letters from professors who have a lot of cache already, your best bet is choosing the professor who will write you the more personal letter and/or the letter that will speak most specifically about yo and your work. 
  19. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to telkanuru in Is attending a lower-ranked program worth it?   
    Strong disagree. It's very straightforward: it is not at all worth it.
    Ranking of programs isn't some arbitrary thing. The reason why Harvard etc. always top the list is not simply because everyone's heard of them. They also have a lot more money to throw around, give their students a more reasonable teaching load, and can bring in important professors every week to socialize. The advantages are manifold.
    That said, ranking for grad progams isn't exactly a science. I definitely wouldn't go as far down the list as the 50s though. 10s at best.
  20. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from TwirlingBlades in Grad. students: What was your worst academic moment as an undergraduate?   
    How much storage space does this BB's server have? I will limit the list to a top (bottom) five.
    While applying to graduate school, I sat down with my transcript and identified the choices I made in every class I took that lowered opportunities to get a better mark in the course overall. These choices included going to see a ball game the night before a midterm, not attending lectures in a class that would have been an "easy A" had I got to the lectures because the exams were 100% lecture based. I didn't lean in while preparing my honor's thesis. The thesis itself earned a very good mark but I didn't maximize the opportunity to develop my skills or my relationships with the supervising graduate assistant and professor. I failed to grasp and to embrace the importance of debates within my discipline.  My approach to course selection prioritized short term advantages over long term needs. I don't like taking timed exams (especially finals) so I consistently picked courses that didn't have any. While preparing for quals as a graduate student, I had many opportunities to gain an increased understanding of how badly I'd screwed up developing the skill of writing to beat the clock. The application for Happyland University's graduate history program requires a book review. My dismissive approach to the debates in my discipline helped contribute to my picking arguably the worst possible book to review. When I didn't get in, a mentor, who'd gone there and had contacts in the department, asked around and charitably told me that it was "politics." But the bottom line was and is, I neither worked smart enough nor hard enough to deserve serious consideration for admission. @desertwoman this is at least the third thread you've started in which you share this unfortunate experience. This is an issue that you're going to be struggling with for years to come. I recommend that you focus on the feedback you've received, especially from @lkaitlyn here. https://forum.thegradcafe.com/topic/120033-has-this-happened-to-anyone-before-lor-problemrelationship-with-professor-damaged/?do=findComment&comment=1058706873
    I also recommend that you figure out a way to understand that in addition to factors beyond your control, your choices played a role in the undesired outcome. The better you understand those choices, the sooner you'll be able to accept responsibility for those choices. Then, you'll be in a better position to make different choices down the line.
    My $0.02.
  21. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to lkaitlyn in Finding the Right Adviser/Realistic Expectations?   
    First, I ditto the response above.
    But second, I think this is the third (?) time you've posted a variation of this (talking about your old adviser, being hurt by the end of the friendship you had, etc.) in the Q&A forum. This post does have good specific questions at the end, but still, I know your username and can guess most of the content of your posts before reading them. This broken relationship is clearly having a profound effect on you, and it might be useful to talk with a professional about your feelings around this in the real world — there's no shame in getting help. On a virtual forum, I don't think we're equipped to help you work through and move past that relationship at this point, and you deserve to be able to put it behind you. Someone with professional experience will also be able to help you set up healthy boundaries as you form connections with new advisors (again, something we cannot help you with online, even if we share things about our relationships with our advisors).
    That's just my two cents. I really am rooting for you.
  22. Like
    Sigaba got a reaction from accidental_philologist in stuff you have to deal with in grad school when you're physically attractive   
    I am sorry that the dynamic is such that you're feeling increasingly isolated from your cohort.
    As a rule of thumb,  trust your instincts. if you feel like you're on the receiving end of inappropriate behavior, people probably are behaving inappropriately towards you. If you're feeling harassed, you're being harassed.
    Would it be possible for you to focus on your coursework for the balance of the term while you regroup and figure out how you want to educate members of your cohort on how they should treat you? Or do you want to write them off entirely for the present, if not permanently? 
     
     
  23. Upvote
    Sigaba reacted to Glasperlenspieler in Scholars who analyze history in terms of power relations like Foucault?   
    Not really.
    Here are three topics of study that could conceivably fall under the description you gave:
    1. The suppression of a particular heresy in monastic communities in Italy in the 14th Century
    2. Philanthropic responses to poverty (and the surrounding discourse) in Victorian England
    3. The American federal government's rhetoric and response to the AIDs epidemic in the 1980s
    An account of any of these topics would almost certainly pertain to an account of the power structures that determine "what people perceive as truth" in a given society and at a given time, as the "obligations which been internalized in people" in those societies as well as how those obligations came to be. And any of these projects could plausibly benefit from a Foucauldian theoretical orientation.
    If you want to get admitted to a graduate program in history, those are the sorts of projects you will need to propose. And, as will be clear, each of these projects will likely demand a radically different methodology, set of research skills, historiographical awareness and knowledge base. Furthermore, each project would require a very different doctoral advisor.
  24. Like
    Sigaba got a reaction from TwirlingBlades in stuff you have to deal with in grad school when you're physically attractive   
    I am sorry that the dynamic is such that you're feeling increasingly isolated from your cohort.
    As a rule of thumb,  trust your instincts. if you feel like you're on the receiving end of inappropriate behavior, people probably are behaving inappropriately towards you. If you're feeling harassed, you're being harassed.
    Would it be possible for you to focus on your coursework for the balance of the term while you regroup and figure out how you want to educate members of your cohort on how they should treat you? Or do you want to write them off entirely for the present, if not permanently? 
     
     
  25. Upvote
    Sigaba got a reaction from Procopius in Fall 2017 applicants   
    What argument are you trying to make? What are you trying to achieve with these numerous posts? Is it your argument that you're under more stress than "typical" applicants?
    If one were to agree (for argument's sake) then the next questions might be how well are you handling that stress publicly? What does your public handling of your stress indicate about your ability to handle the additional stress of a doctoral program? Are you making the case that you could handle that additional stress independently, gracefully, and,ultimately, professionally?
    As for the "tiny bits of information," I think that you're trying to have it both ways. You make more of your private life public (and this tactic is a mistake) but when you don't get the response you want, you attempt to pull rank (as a single parent, as a potential homeowner, as a person with a graduate degree, as a person who has had health issues, as a person who has lost a beloved family member) and then you say that people don't have enough information. If you received the affirmation you clearly want, would you dismiss it by saying that it is based on "tiny bits of information"?
    Here's the deal. When graduate students are going through their qualifying exams (arguably a stressful experience), professors respond to explicit and implicit prompts for empathy with mockery and a cold grin. "Why so glum? When I took my quals, I had to walk to the department up hill ten miles both ways on a frozen road under a 110 degree sun after growing the trees and milling the paper on which I wrote my answers, in Old East Slavic, using my blood as ink and a gnawed fingernail as a quill." Or words to that effect.
    Regardless of what is said, the message is "Deal with it." (Well, in some cases, it's actually "Fuck you, deal with it.")
    "Deal with it" will be the same message professors send when you get bounced off the walls in seminar, when due dates fall in the same week, when a professor stands on your head in office hours for screwing up an essay, and when your schedule and your teaching responsibilities collide.
    What is your plan for when you're told to deal with it? Will it be similar to the one you're executing now? If so, please understand that professors will be watching and judging and, generally, doing so with a profound disinterest in the circumstances of your everyday life. (The disinterest will be especially ironic when when it comes from a social historian.)
    You, and at least one other person reading this--trainwreck of a sidebar--are misunderstanding the guidance being offered. You're not being told that you can't make it, or that you can't do it, or that you're not resilient, or that you're not worth it.
    You're being told by people further along the road that you're walking that the path gets harder and less certain. You're being told that NOW is the time to start steeling yourself for the tough sledding ahead. You're being told that airing your personal grief/anxiety/angst in a semi public place using your actual name is an exceptionally bad idea because you're seeking entry into programs run by some of the most imaginative and skilled researchers on the planet. You are being told that many of those academics view themselves as guardians of a profession under siege.
    You are being asked: are you sending a message that your up for this fight or are you sending another message?
     
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